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Trains remain popular choice for vacationers as SRT poised to improve services

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Trains remain popular choice for vacationers as SRT poised to improve services

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BANGKOK, 13 April 2015 (NNT) – Quite a few Thai and foreign holidaymakers have chosen to travel by train to their hometowns or holiday destinations during the Songkran holiday; meanwhile, the State Railway of Thailand (SRT) is carrying out a major revamp of railway services.

Plagued by complaints about poor services, the State Railway of Thailand is now trying to redeem itself by a series of improvements to secure the public confidence.

To beef up safety for women and children, the SRT has introduced special carriages called 'Lady Bogie' to answer the need of female passengers travelling by themselves and those traveling with their kids.

Signs and announcements in various train stations are now bilingual to facilitate foreign travelers. These improvements have apparently worked out, as seen from the number of local and international passengers, which has dramatically jumped during this holiday season.

Foreign tourists who choose to travel by train said they found Thai railway services were quite economical and convenient. Thai passengers, meanwhile, said they still believed that railway system was quite safe compared to other kinds of transport, adding that the introduction of carriages for ladies did boost their confidence in the SRT.

Aside from the carriages for ladies, Thanongsak Pongprasert, head of SRT's routes and schedules, disclosed that the SRT had added up more carriages to each train in a bid to transport as many as 20,000 people per trip during the holiday season. The SRT also allows the public to book tickets 60 days in advance.

The SRT is also poised to launch a major facelift of facilities at all trains stations across the country. The changes are expected to be noticeable in six months.

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How about improving your safety at crossing and stop with the pr bs.wink.png

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How about telling the passengers to stop tossing garbage out the windows?

Any luck on getting the trains to run on time?

Has the bed bug issue been resolved in regard to the sleeper cars?

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There must be a whole new breed of brave tourists showing up

if they are anxious for a Thai train trip. In light of all the recent

crashes...... :-) Oh wait the headline says vacationers, so I guess

that means poor Thai people who are forced to take the train

for economic reasons.

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No trains anymore. Since it's even not possible to get a cold beer on a 18 hours journey, trains have lost their last attraction.

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Thai overland train-system is really stuck in the 19. century while most other countries (even 3.-world countries) have arrived in the 21. century. Have you ever seen the "communication" in running trains or at stations? Messages are in a little plastic-bag that dangles on a pole beside the track. The train driver grab them WITH BARE HANDS and then, a few miles later, hang that plastic-bag with the "answer" back on another pole, sometimes with the help of stick. You can watch that at the stations in Buriram or Udon-Thani or when you go to the first carriage and watch the drivers-cabin from behind. I have never seen that anywhere in the world and it really makes the impression of a child-train in an amusement-park....

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Edited by jackinthebox

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No trains anymore. Since it's even not possible to get a cold beer on a 18 hours journey, trains have lost their last attraction.

So sad, too bad, never mind! Join the smokers who want to fly! whistling.gif

BTW - I don't smoke and I am able to go without a beer (and I do enjoy one) for 18 hours coffee1.gif

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I don't think I've ever read, even on this site, a piece of BS that is so obviously a shameless press release saying sweet FA.

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

Thai overland train-system is really stuck in the 19. century while most other countries (even 3.-world countries) have arrived in the 21. century. Have you ever seen the "communication" in running trains or at stations? Messages are in a little plastic-bag that dangles on a pole beside the track. The train driver grab them WITH BARE HANDS and then, a few miles later, hang that plastic-bag with the "answer" back on another pole, sometimes with the help of stick. You can watch that at the stations in Buriram or Udon-Thani or when you go to the first carriage and watch the drivers-cabin from behind. I have never seen that anywhere in the world and it really makes the impression of a child-train in an amusement-park....

Yes , dates back 120 years and Thailand did not have the British or French taking care of it until the late 50s. The signaling system is archaic in most areas as is the sleeper baseplate and dogspike Track fastening system

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The signalling system is perfectly adequate, as long as the signals are obeyed. The method of fixing rails to sleepers is perfectly adequate if sleepers are replaced when they rot. Passing messages as described, although low tech, works does it not?

The problem with Thailand's railway system does not lie in the age of the equipment, it lies in the way in which it is managed.

Edited by JAG

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The signalling system is perfectly adequate, as long as the signals are obeyed. The method of fixing rails to sleepers is perfectly adequate if sleepers are replaced when they rot. Passing messages as described, although low tech, works does it not?

The problem with Thailand's railway system does not lie in the age of the equipment, it lies in the way in which it is managed.

The fastest train from Buriram to Bangkok ("Special express") takes 7½ hours - for a distance of 380 kilometers! Obviousliy, they can't do it faster with the existing equipment (tracks, trains, signalling, crossing, stations etc.). Thai trains have an average travel speed of 40-50kph. So, instead of dreaming of bullet trains going 300kph (wich they will never afford, even with the help of the Chinese) they should with little money mondernise their existing system and try to reach average travel speeds of 80-100kph, wich would be enough for a country the size of thailand (ie. 7 hour ride Bangkok-ChiangMai compared to 12 hours today or 10 hours Bangkok-HatYai compared to 16½ hours today).

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

The signalling system is perfectly adequate, as long as the signals are obeyed. The method of fixing rails to sleepers is perfectly adequate if sleepers are replaced when they rot. Passing messages as described, although low tech, works does it not?

The problem with Thailand's railway system does not lie in the age of the equipment, it lies in the way in which it is managed.

5555555555555555555555 You're telling me that Dog Spikes are adequate fastenings for a modern Railway.?

What sort of speed do you estimate they are safe for ?

Edited by ExPratt

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The real problems are and have been the lack of funding and fares kept low as Govt policy over a long period of time with those who manage the system having to make do with what they are given.

Yes rail is a popular way to travel, as I posted elsewhere I tried to get some friends on a train south and was told every train was fully booked for the whole month of April except for a few third class seats.

For long distance travel second class fan sleepers are the one for me.

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

The real problems are and have been the lack of funding and fares kept low as Govt policy over a long period of time with those who manage the system having to make do with what they are given.

Yes rail is a popular way to travel, as I posted elsewhere I tried to get some friends on a train south and was told every train was fully booked for the whole month of April except for a few third class seats.

For long distance travel second class fan sleepers are the one for me.

I dont mind a train journey myself Rob , I suppose the problem in this part of the world is reliability. If you have a single track and the thing is dilapidated and falling to bits your could be hanging about for hours. The difference in Malaysia's old single Track and the new double track hopefully will convince Thailand to get on with getting theirs at least get it started.

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I enjoy train travel. Sort of nostalgic. My father was a railroad man and we used to get free train rides back in the day. (Oh, and hopped a few with buddies just for kicks. Darn lucky none of us lost limb or life!)

I've ridden trains twice in Thailand: an overnighter BKK - Chianmai, Japanese sleeper. Slept like a baby to the rocking/rolling/rumbling. But . . . the cockroaches in the cabin and what must have been bed bug bites sort of ruined the memory and has kept me from trying it again.

Second was a lazy Chiangmai - BKK daytime trip. Quite enjoyable seeing the countryside and the little stations along the way, as well as the interesting people, but a bit too long (timewise).

Usually, however, I feel too busy for such long rides and take the quick and cheap Nok Air flights.

BTW: I lived in Korea in the mid-80's when their trains were, in my opinion, far worse than what Thai trains are today. Fast forward to a wealthier Korea and a system that's coming close to Japanese standards. I expect with wealth, Thailand will also improve.

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