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Do You Live In A Thai Village Full Time

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If you were brought up in the West and you don't understand how nature works, how family units should be, how not to look down on others, and learn as children to respect each other and their elders, then you didn't have the kind of upbringing that I and everyone I know did.

These qualities are part of maturing in any civilized society....

But do these character traits really exist in your civilised societies?

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If you were brought up in the West and you don't understand how nature works, how family units should be, how not to look down on others, and learn as children to respect each other and their elders, then you didn't have the kind of upbringing that I and everyone I know did.

These qualities are part of maturing in any civilized society....

But do these character traits really exist in your civilised societies?

No, zzaa, he's fantasising.

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If you were brought up in the West and you don't understand how nature works, how family units should be, how not to look down on others, and learn as children to respect each other and their elders, then you didn't have the kind of upbringing that I and everyone I know did.

These qualities are part of maturing in any civilized society....

But do these character traits really exist in your civilised societies?

No, zzaa, he's fantasising.

Yes, that quite obvious.....;)

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I have been in Thailand probably longer than most expats. I first moved here in 1991 and with the exception of returning to the US for a total of five years, have lived here full time.

For the first ten years or so, I was addicted to the bright lights and everything that goes with them. Had anyone told me that I would eventually end up living out in the boonies, I would have told them they were insane. Things change and I think that eventually a person burns out, gets bored and needs a change.

I was raised as a farm boy and never forgot about living on the farm. I wanted a workshop, a garden and a big dog. I now have those things and am quite content. Of course the right woman makes all this possible.

I have a good friend who has lived in Jomtien for eight and a half years. He has been calling me quite often and asking many questions. He has decided to give living upcountry a shot. He is moving just outside of Saraburi. Why Saraburi? His wife is originally from that area. I told him that some people can live in the boonies and some people just can't handle it. I advised him to give it try for a month or so, then make the decision.

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I have been in Thailand probably longer than most expats. I first moved here in 1991 and with the exception of returning to the US for a total of five years, have lived here full time.

For the first ten years or so, I was addicted to the bright lights and everything that goes with them. Had anyone told me that I would eventually end up living out in the boonies, I would have told them they were insane. Things change and I think that eventually a person burns out, gets bored and needs a change.

I was raised as a farm boy and never forgot about living on the farm. I wanted a workshop, a garden and a big dog. I now have those things and am quite content. Of course the right woman makes all this possible.

I have a good friend who has lived in Jomtien for eight and a half years. He has been calling me quite often and asking many questions. He has decided to give living upcountry a shot. He is moving just outside of Saraburi. Why Saraburi? His wife is originally from that area. I told him that some people can live in the boonies and some people just can't handle it. I advised him to give it try for a month or so, then make the decision.

Very true Gary, few are suited to life in a rural village. As I drive around the Ubon district I see the relics of those who came spent and went. Nice houses inhabited by chickens. Jim

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The defensive seem to think that living in a Thai village is the key to something that cannot be had elsewhere:

Living in a Thai village enables one to learn new things everyday. How to understand how nature works, how the family unit really should be. How not to look down on people just because of what they do. To get by day by day with no worries. It also enables you to watch kids respecting eachother and their elders.

If you were brought up in the West and you don't understand how nature works, how family units should be, how not to look down on others, and learn as children to respect each other and their elders, then you didn't have the kind of upbringing that I and everyone I know did.

These qualities are part of maturing in any civilized society, not the sole domain of hardscrabble Thailand.

And I also see most, but not all, of the replies are ad hominem. And as such, do not require replies.

I was making a personal comment and one also based on people I know coming back from an Issan holiday complaining that life there is boring to the point of tears.

If you want to live in the sticks, more power to you.

By the way, by "peasant," I mean:

1. A member of the class constituted by small farmers and tenants, sharecroppers, and laborers on the land where they form the main labor force in agriculture.2. A country person; a rustic.

You must get bored with all the culture living on Samui, ( Samui : the Blackpool of Thailand 555 )

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I have been in Thailand probably longer than most expats. I first moved here in 1991 and with the exception of returning to the US for a total of five years, have lived here full time.

For the first ten years or so, I was addicted to the bright lights and everything that goes with them. Had anyone told me that I would eventually end up living out in the boonies, I would have told them they were insane. Things change and I think that eventually a person burns out, gets bored and needs a change.

I was raised as a farm boy and never forgot about living on the farm. I wanted a workshop, a garden and a big dog. I now have those things and am quite content. Of course the right woman makes all this possible.

I have a good friend who has lived in Jomtien for eight and a half years. He has been calling me quite often and asking many questions. He has decided to give living upcountry a shot. He is moving just outside of Saraburi. Why Saraburi? His wife is originally from that area. I told him that some people can live in the boonies and some people just can't handle it. I advised him to give it try for a month or so, then make the decision.

Very true Gary, few are suited to life in a rural village. As I drive around the Ubon district I see the relics of those who came spent and went. Nice houses inhabited by chickens. Jim

I'm surprised the squatters haven't moved in.

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I've spent enjoyable hours reading this thread while feeding my new born son (I didn't feed him continuously for hours of course) and hope that you guys would continue with your very amusing and interesting stories. I will also be heading off down your way in the coming years so it's a great theoretical introduction.

Are there any non-farang's on this thread?

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I haven't read all 22 pages of this thread, but one thing keeps occuring to me: Why would anyone want to live like a Thai peasant?

Don't get me wrong, heyseeds can be nice people, but living without meaningful culture -- no access to the arts, concerts, performances, exhibitions, theater, cinema, bookstores, fine dining, clubs of like-minded people, et al -- seems to be a dire regression in the quality of life.

I am not sure how many people in the West would say, "Yes, when I retire I want to live in basic conditions with no intellectual stimulation and feed pigs/watch rice grow/house countless relatives on my nickel, and so on. Oh, and since I can't really speak Thai, I have no idea what anyone is talking about unless my wife chooses to tell me, but even that's iffy since her English language skills are at about the level of a three-year-old English speaker."

Almost everywhere I look, I find educated gentlemen from the West dumbing themselves down to the point where they are a pathetic parody of themselves. What could possibly be the key motivation for this?

Of course I respect the right of the individual to conduct his last years, or his mature years, in any fashion he desires. But the motivation escapes me here. It would be like someone wanting to live in quasi-poverty among the uneducated (or under-educated) and the intellectually incurious....where a "big event" is going to "the city" to shop at Tesco? I mean that's just sad.

And by the way, how many Western women come to Thailand to retire in a backwoods village? What does this tell you about the situation?

I'm hoping to retire to my husband's village eventually, there are good and bad points to living in a village just as there is living in a city so it just depends what points are more important to you.

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There are justified and balanced good and bad points towards anywhere in the world.

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Since the thread has started again, I can add that I still have a very nice sixty square meter one bedroom condo in Jomtien. It is within walking distance of the beach. I enjoyed living there but I have been a country boy all my life and missed the country.

My wife and I have lived upcountry for about 7 years now. I don't HAVE to live upcountry but I am content and like it here. Hopefully my wife will continue to put up with me and I won't have to move back to the condo.

As I previously posted, many people likely can't handle living in a small country village but it suits me just fine. We also have a VERY small get away house on one of the two small farms that overlooks a pond. I enjoy sitting on the front porch watching the sun go down over the mountains. I would really like to live there but alas, there is no electricity available.

There are a number of fine houses around here that for one reason or another are no longer occupied by the farangs who had them built.

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Since the thread has started again, I can add that I still have a very nice sixty square meter one bedroom condo in Jomtien. It is within walking distance of the beach. I enjoyed living there but I have been a country boy all my life and missed the country.

My wife and I have lived upcountry for about 7 years now. I don't HAVE to live upcountry but I am content and like it here. Hopefully my wife will continue to put up with me and I won't have to move back to the condo.

As I previously posted, many people likely can't handle living in a small country village but it suits me just fine. We also have a VERY small get away house on one of the two small farms that overlooks a pond. I enjoy sitting on the front porch watching the sun go down over the mountains. I would really like to live there but alas, there is no electricity available.

There are a number of fine houses around here that for one reason or another are no longer occupied by the farangs who had them built.

Is it not practical to purchase a diesel powered generator for your electricity needs?

There has also been mention in other threads of so called abandoned houses. Any idea whether these are on the market or is ownership being disputed?

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GaryA, I would love to be in your condo in Pattaya right now.3 days of driving rain, can't get out of the house never mind the village.

BKK if you see a big old farang house lying empty just go to the village head, he will tell you who owns it. Round this district there are many and the Thais won't live in them as they are usually to far from the village and family. Second hand houses don't have much value. Jim

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Since the thread has started again, I can add that I still have a very nice sixty square meter one bedroom condo in Jomtien. It is within walking distance of the beach. I enjoyed living there but I have been a country boy all my life and missed the country.

My wife and I have lived upcountry for about 7 years now. I don't HAVE to live upcountry but I am content and like it here. Hopefully my wife will continue to put up with me and I won't have to move back to the condo.

As I previously posted, many people likely can't handle living in a small country village but it suits me just fine. We also have a VERY small get away house on one of the two small farms that overlooks a pond. I enjoy sitting on the front porch watching the sun go down over the mountains. I would really like to live there but alas, there is no electricity available.

There are a number of fine houses around here that for one reason or another are no longer occupied by the farangs who had them built.

Is it not practical to purchase a diesel powered generator for your electricity needs?

There has also been mention in other threads of so called abandoned houses. Any idea whether these are on the market or is ownership being disputed?

Diesel generators are generally too big and expensive just to run a TV and a few lights. I do have a 2,500 watt gasoline generator that has plenty of power but it is still quite expensive to run for more than a few hours at a time. We seldom spend the night there but when we do I have a fairly large UPS that I bring from home. It will provide light overnight. I also have a propane fueled mantle light for outside.

I only know of one house that has been abandoned and that is a disputed ownership. Most of them are happily occupied by the ex wife and/or her family.

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hmmm never seen this thread before..probably because I am too busy living in the boonies.

Lots of very good comments on here mostly consistent with my/our adopted life style!

My living in the boonies and being a semi gentleman farmer sort of just happened...no plan whatsoever..never been a farmer except on dad's post war allotment in central London a million years ago.....he dreamed of having a small holding.. which never materialized...told me once on the telephone when we first bought the farm (when mum was asking "whatever for etc etc etc!?"), "keep doing what ya doing son ..you'll be okay".

So he was right... we are okay and very happy...now have the farm and a pleasant modest house we built 5 years ago.

OK sometimes can get a bit boring.. when it's pissing down and I can't take my usual turn around the farm with 6 dogs in tow.

Typical day is much like others inasmuch as it is: sleep ( anytime), eat, drink, potter around garden reorganizing,planting, weeding, potting... blah blah,start well water pumps to fill our tanks, help wifey collecting rubber sometimes,spreading fertilizer,brush cutting our euphemistic lawn,chucking rubber in the truck and selling...etc etc

Often get invaded by step kids, nieces and their friends all sitting cross legged on the veranda making tons papaya salad and stuff all at 10db conversation level( the mortar and pestle thumping does get to me though after a while)...I just sit on the other end of the veranda looking out over our farm and the valley below,veg with a scotch or beer and enjoy being surrounded by 5 or 6 pretty 17-20yo girls.

We go to Phuket quite often for R&R and have many friends there ...exchange a pile of used books, buy stuff that we don't need..get a bit drunk at our friends' bar/restaurant ( always a party for something and sometimes nothing), hit the beach etc ...try to ignore the unaccustomed "noise"...

Don't know that I would change anything...better than anything I could have imagined methinks..

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