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BANGKOK 24 April 2019 19:26
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macb

Do You Live In A Thai Village Full Time

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great thread, I recently returned from a visit to Kantharalak and am planning to sell up and move there from Perth WA, gf has a rental for now and fulltime job, @ 57 and after raising 4 kids in oz its time to do what I want, language and culture are a big challenge for me so keep the posts going, cheers all Kimbo

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It's been interesting reading over the lives of people for the SIX years since this thread was started. I'm amazed it's still going - especially as there doesn't seem to have been much in the way of the usual trolling or aggression.

While the basics are much the same, they are all different.

Over the past few years, we've had a couple of deaths, a few uni grads, nephew has made sergent in the army - with 95% in his exam. The niece that caused lots of trouble as a teenager has seen the light & settled down, only a year or so off being a nurse and is buying her parents thier first house.

Watching the villages of our area grow and change each visit has been interesting. New stores, new markets, new houses. The bus to Chaiyaphum is less frequent than before. Good thing it's only 40km. There are still only a few foreigners about the place. Haven't met any of them over the years, but I know they exist. I remember seeing one in the next village once, about 7 years back. I don't recall ever seeing any tourist types though. Few in Chaiyaphum sometimes, but not near us.

My Thai is still limited - I don't pick up a lot of the tones, so I'd only understand the wrong things anyway.

Last trip we did a 'walking tour' of the village, taking photos of the old buildings and their inhabitants when possible. It's nice to have a record of what was there before the (grand)kids get the place & knock it down. As with the westerners, a lot of the oldies have some interesting stories to tell; just ask what their lives were like when they were kids. A lot of them will be happy to tell someone that wants to listen. For most of us it will be very different to what we had.

Edited by pgs
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As said. village life is not for most, but once settled there is no better place to be. You are not just another person on the street, but part of the village. Small villages are big families and a family takes care of their own. It's not heaven or hell, but it's a lot better than being a nameless face on a street in a city. Jim

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As said. village life is not for most, but once settled there is no better place to be. You are not just another person on the street, but part of the village. Small villages are big families and a family takes care of their own. It's not heaven or hell, but it's a lot better than being a nameless face on a street in a city. Jim

Well said

Its life Jim but not as we know it!

Think I've heard that before somewhere?

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For anyone that grew up and worked in a city, village life here must be a real shock. On another thread here I was accused of living in a hovel and of being vulnerable to roaming bands of Cambodian drug fiends. The hovel is still there, serving a a store place for the farming machines and any Cambodians don't take it on themselves to drive the 8 Km from the main road under the eyes of all and sundry, to nick stuff in our village. A buffalo plus two Kubota tractors disappeared just before rice harvest from the village up on the main road. In our village someone stole half a fish, he no longer gets any jobs in the village.

What amazes me is the mixture of prude attitudes (my wife,a very intelligent lady, chats with the prostitutes, quite often when they come back from Pattaya and discover that unprotected sex isn't a good idea) and libertarianism. Some in the village ostracise her.

I experience almost every day people getting drunk, the ladies begin to shout out banana jokes and take their pick of the assembled court.

It's a mixture. I have the impression of an amoral society where you can solve everything by going to the temple and buying amulets (bit like medieval Catholicism really) accompanied by a rigid scheme of how things should be done.

I quite like it really and just do my thing.

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@ Cooked: Their hovel, your castle. As long as you're happy, it matters not what others think.

I live in a city (Sydney) here by necessity, not by choice. I'm far happier in TH, in a little village somewhere without most of the unecessary mod-cons (emphasis on cons) of today.

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We were invited by a friend to a party for her son going into the monkhood last night. AFAIK she isn't married and has a son and daughter and lives in a small shophouse in the main village.

We got there early as it was school on Friday so we could leave early.

There was probably 40 or 50 8 person tables with coke and soda bottles, glasses etc and when we sat down somebody turned up with a bottle of Hong Thong and we had a good time. There was the usual singing and "pretty" girls up on the stage and 3 or 4 singers but it wasn't too loud. plenty of food was served and a great night was had. My son was happy as I took him down the 6km on the Honda CB 400 with lots of noise but in lower gears so I didn't go that fast.

The local BiB were out in force on 3 tables behind us trying to find the bottom of the whisky bottle. My wife and friends got an invitation to another party next friday at the local school from the wife of a Pol Lt so thats next Friday night sorted out.

My son and I went home just before 9 and he had the biggest smile I have seen in a long while after the ride home and 'er indoors strolled in after 10 mumbling things like drink, drunk, die.

She got up before 6 to get our son sorted out for school the went back and died for another 3 hours. She made a coffee and had a fag and I spoke quietly and looked into her eyes. sad.pngw00t.gifbah.gif

I haven't seen pissholes in the snow like that for a long time. smile.pngbiggrin.pnglaugh.png

At 47 I think she has lost her touch. thumbsup.gifwhistling.gif

And we have to do it all over again next Friday.

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One disadvantage of living out in the rurals is that there are no handt western style supermarkets to nip in to.

This has made me relearn how to cook and make my own food.

I now make bacon, ham, pate, bread, rolls and odd other bits that sometimes work and the mistakes are eaten by the cats, dogs, chickens or ducks. Little gets wasted here.

This morning I got my son and his friend from next door over and we made some fairy cakes with mixed fruit and a cherry on the top. This involves some planning in the monthly bulk shopping and Pi Suk's shop in the village which sels some baking things.

I showed them how to weigh things and mix them up in the bowl and gave them a choice of mixed fruit or raisins, sultanas are hard to find, and they chose the mixed fruit

They took turns in mixing and then filling the cake cases but were a bit confused with the left overs in the bowl. I explained that the leftovers were the cooks perk and as they were a bit dubious I ate some and they tried a taste and that cleaned the bowl.

I put the cakes in the oven and they were done in 20 minutes and the first ones were gone 15 minutes later.

They enjoyed doing the cake making judging by the big grins and the mess they made.

Next weekend we will try for a sponge cake with icing and hundreds and thousands.

Neither of the mothers ever made cakes because they are Thai and don't know how.

I am using my memory, some of what my ex-wife taught me and the internet.

If it all goes wrong we have 19 ducks and loads of chickens in for a good time soon.

Have a great dayand tink about me hiding in the corner scoffing home mede cakes where the kids can't find me.

Edited by billd766
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One disadvantage of living out in the rurals is that there are no handt western style supermarkets to nip in to.

This has made me relearn how to cook and make my own food.

I now make bacon, ham, pate, bread, rolls and odd other bits that sometimes work and the mistakes are eaten by the cats, dogs, chickens or ducks. Little gets wasted here.

This morning I got my son and his friend from next door over and we made some fairy cakes with mixed fruit and a cherry on the top. This involves some planning in the monthly bulk shopping and Pi Suk's shop in the village which sels some baking things.

I showed them how to weigh things and mix them up in the bowl and gave them a choice of mixed fruit or raisins, sultanas are hard to find, and they chose the mixed fruit

They took turns in mixing and then filling the cake cases but were a bit confused with the left overs in the bowl. I explained that the leftovers were the cooks perk and as they were a bit dubious I ate some and they tried a taste and that cleaned the bowl.

I put the cakes in the oven and they were done in 20 minutes and the first ones were gone 15 minutes later.

They enjoyed doing the cake making judging by the big grins and the mess they made.

Next weekend we will try for a sponge cake with icing and hundreds and thousands.

Neither of the mothers ever made cakes because they are Thai and don't know how.

I am using my memory, some of what my ex-wife taught me and the internet.

If it all goes wrong we have 19 ducks and loads of chickens in for a good time soon.

Have a great dayand tink about me hiding in the corner scoffing home mede cakes where the kids can't find me.

I think my computer has a case of the stupids.

The last line should have read

Have a great day and think about me hiding in the corner, scoffing home made cakes where the kids can't find me.

Edited by billd766
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Life in a Thai village for me would be a nightmare of boredom and isolation etc,.... while i understand for others, it is an idyllic fantasy. wai.gif

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We have actually an Irish, Dutch, another German, a French, a US, a Swiss plus a Japanese but they only visit the village for the Songkran holidays.

Some of their wife's are playing already with local guys and the foreigners just keeps sending money. Go figure...

.......mmm....mmm laugh.png

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Last week I made some belly porkinto Honey and mustard bacon.

The biggest problem I have is slicing it thin enough but whatever it still tastes great.

This is about 3 kg worth.

post-5614-0-67619900-1363158302_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-26792100-1363158494_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-92517600-1363158327_thumb.jp

post-5614-0-65715700-1363158515_thumb.jp

Bacon-honey mustard cure.doc

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