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Do You Live In A Thai Village Full Time

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Love the attempt at reimbursing some of the double dosh!

I'll bet they didn't insist too mutt!

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TPWG,

I'll add to the "great post"

But also want to congratulate you on the house, beautiful! It is similar to the one we are trying to come up with for our move in a few years.

Did you draw it up, or use someones plans?

Guess what I'm getting at is...........

Do you have more pics/ plans on the house? Not really on thread, but would love to see PM or otherwise.

Appreciate anything! Thanks!!

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Love the attempt at reimbursing some of the double dosh!

I'll bet they didn't insist too mutt!

Hi All

Thanks for all the positive response’s to my post on village life. I am currently trying to summon up the courage to post the details of the unfortunate events that unfolded that very evening at the Karaoke bar.

However, before doing so I have to mentally prepare for the possibility of a re-occurrence of the flashbacks and nightmares that followed that fateful evening.

After all, the last thing I want to do is bring on a bout of my old trouble, the coprolalia phase of my latent Tourette's syndrome is particularly embarrassing. :o (Google it) Wikipedia

God…I love Thailand.

TBWG :D

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This has been a very refreshing and interesting thread,

Thanx to all the posters for sharing.

Having spent an odd weekend or two in a few villages, (Korat, Suphanburi),

I often wondered what an extended existence would be like, how one would fill their day, etc.

Thanx all, :o

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I used to live in a village near Kumpawapi full time, in fact I was the only Falang to live here despite 5 other Thai Falang marriages and one gay couple. I have been told that the other Falangs all stayed in hotels because they couldn’t handle the dirt/dust, flies, no hot water etc.

I didn’t mind all that, my problem was the boredom.

I got up with the family around 6 am had a cup of coffee, then sat around for a couple of hours then had breakfast at a more civilised hour.

If my dodgy internet connection was working I would check emails and surf the net until lunchtime.

I would then have a light lunch and return to the computer with a beer, I made it a rule of mine never to drink before noon !

The highlight of my day was to go shopping with my wife in Kumpawapi or Udon Thani.

During the day my wife did all the things Thai women do, a few chores, and a lot of eating, sleeping and of course non stop gossip !

I would go to bed around 8 pm.

Next day I got up with the family around 6 am had a cup of coffee……etc, etc, etc,

.

BORED !! I was!

Because I had always led an active life, I found I was not ready to curl up and die just yet, ( Retire !! )

So last January I decided to go on a teacher training course down in Ban Phe. My wife was horrified when she found out that it cost nearly 70,000 Baht. She did everything she possibly could to try to stop me, even after I qualified she was telling me to stop being silly.

But I am now an English teacher in a fairly large school 3 hours south of my wife’s village.

A house is supplied with the job, and my wife and our 2 year old daughter live with me most of the time.

I teach 1,200 students a week from the age of 13 to 18, and now there are not enough hours in the day for me. My wife gives me very little support despite being told that I am a good teacher ( something she doesn’t want to hear as she was sure I would

“ Crash and Burn” when I started teaching ). I know I am not a good teacher yet, but one day I will be, as I get on well with the kids and my fellow teachers ( they think I am a crazy Falang teacher ).

I only drink at weekends now ( and then not to excess ) and I now live in a small town population approximately 12,000. I am the only Falang living here, and there are no western amenities, just a couple of Thai Karaoke bars just outside of town. We haven’t even got a 7/11 here, so I now have to go shopping at Tesco’s in a nearby large town 30 kilometres away.

I decided on Teaching after I visited some friends in Pattaya . where I felt embarrassed to be a westerner. I looked at all the brain dead, western morons there, most of whom have never seen Thailand,

( Pattaya is Pattaya and is not representative of Thailand !!) and felt that there was more to life than Sun, Sex and Beer,

I didn’t like the way the western males treated Thai people especially the women there.

Most of us who live here know that Thai women do not work bar because they like it, (one once told me that,”it was a dirty job but the money was good”) most have young children they have to support, and nearly all their money is sent home to their families. Most of the Pattaya type males show no respect or understanding for these Ladies. Of course there are some Thai women who enjoy the lifestyle, but I am sure not many.

So if like me any of you are not ready for the scrap heap just yet, and can’t face endless days of dull boring routine inactivity, try going on a teacher training course, age is not a problem. Once qualified you could even teach privately in your own village, it doesn’t have to be a full time job and it will give you the chance to have something to aim for in life, instead of just filling the days until you eventually die.

My only regret is that I didn’t find out about teaching years ago. I really enjoy the work, and the Thai kids are great, they are very respectful to everyone, unlike Western Kids !!

When I lived in a village I was 58 going on 70. Now I am teaching I am 58 going on 30 !!

Edited by wapipatjohn
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I used to live in a village near Kumpawapi full time, in fact I was the only Falang to live here despite 5 other Thai Falang marriages and one gay couple. I have been told that the other Falangs all stayed in hotels because they couldn’t handle the dirt/dust, flies, no hot water etc.

I didn’t mind all that, my problem was the boredom.

I got up with the family around 6 am had a cup of coffee, then sat around for a couple of hours then had breakfast at a more civilised hour.

If my dodgy internet connection was working I would check emails and surf the net until lunchtime.

I would then have a light lunch and return to the computer with a beer, I made it a rule of mine never to drink before noon !

The highlight of my day was to go shopping with my wife in Kumpawapi or Udon Thani.

During the day my wife did all the things Thai women do, a few chores, and a lot of eating, sleeping and of course non stop gossip !

I would go to bed around 8 pm.

Next day I got up with the family around 6 am had a cup of coffee……etc, etc, etc,

.

BORED !! I was!

Because I had always led an active life, I found I was not ready to curl up and die just yet, ( Retire !! )

So last January I decided to go on a teacher training course down in Ban Phe. My wife was horrified when she found out that it cost nearly 70,000 Baht. She did everything she possibly could to try to stop me, even after I qualified she was telling me to stop being silly.

But I am now an English teacher in a fairly large school 3 hours south of my wife’s village.

A house is supplied with the job, and my wife and our 2 year old daughter live with me most of the time.

I teach 1,200 students a week from the age of 13 to 18, and now there are not enough hours in the day for me. My wife gives me very little support despite being told that I am a good teacher ( something she doesn’t want to hear as she was sure I would

“ Crash and Burn” when I started teaching ). I know I am not a good teacher yet, but one day I will be, as I get on well with the kids and my fellow teachers ( they think I am a crazy Falang teacher ).

I only drink at weekends now ( and then not to excess ) and I now live in a small town population approximately 12,000. I am the only Falang living here, and there are no western amenities, just a couple of Thai Karaoke bars just outside of town. We haven’t even got a 7/11 here, so I now have to go shopping at Tesco’s in a nearby large town 30 kilometres away.

I decided on Teaching after I visited some friends in Pattaya . where I felt embarrassed to be a westerner. I looked at all the brain dead, western morons there, most of whom have never seen Thailand,

( Pattaya is Pattaya and is not representative of Thailand !!) and felt that there was more to life than Sun, Sex and Beer,

I didn’t like the way the western males treated Thai people especially the women there.

Most of us who live here know that Thai women do not work bar because they like it, (one once told me that,”it was a dirty job but the money was good”) most have young children they have to support, and nearly all their money is sent home to their families. Most of the Pattaya type males show no respect or understanding for these Ladies. Of course there are some Thai women who enjoy the lifestyle, but I am sure not many.

So if like me any of you are not ready for the scrap heap just yet, and can’t face endless days of dull boring routine inactivity, try going on a teacher training course, age is not a problem. Once qualified you could even teach privately in your own village, it doesn’t have to be a full time job and it will give you the chance to have something to aim for in life, instead of just filling the days until you eventually die.

My only regret is that I didn’t find out about teaching years ago. I really enjoy the work, and the Thai kids are great, they are very respectful to everyone, unlike Western Kids !!

When I lived in a village I was 58 going on 70. Now I am teaching I am 58 going on 30 !!

GREAT POST!!

this has to be the best "feel good" post of the new millenium.

i also live in a village, between kk and udon thani, and getting married dec. 1st (to an ex bargirl, by the way) who is the best woman i've met . by the way, i LOVE village life.

wish i could write more at this time but i'm sitting on a rig in the bay of bengal on a 15 minute coffe break.

good luck to all of us!

turnpike

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An excellent thread!

As mentioned before - One of the best.

We are back in the UK at the mo. (back to the house in January)

Our three winged, Bharn Thai house, that I designed, is between Pakchong and Khao Yai and up in the hills. Asian chickens everywhere.

I will get up just after the mother in law. Great sloshings of bowls of water, and washing being hung up to dry.

The coffee mug filled, I just pootle about, The sound of mopeds and cow bells. Feeling the heat of the sun building by the minute...

No, I am not at the house as I sit typing this, but my good wishes go out to all of you in the Boonies.

Who of you got married at the house?

I will keep reading your posts. Every picture and observation noted makes me more gutted that I'm not HOME.

Keeping flying your own farang flags!

Chok Dee

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Sadly I don't get to live in Thailand full-time. But when I am there I don't want to come back to Sydney.

From my first visit to my (now) wife's village in Ampur Khon Sa Wan (Chaiyaphum), I have been treated as a local. No-one tries to increase prices for me in our villages, I have always had the 'locals' prices at the market - wife checked a few times what she would pay to what I paid. My sisters look after me well & I have a lovely Thai family. I sometimes help out at one of the internet cafes in the next village & usually have a few days each visit at one of the local schools. The kids & teachers love it. We try to have at least one outing with the school staff. The last two Mother's Days I was at the school by special request - if you don't come, we will collect you. The bus inspector at Chaiyaphum has a little English & generally has a quick chat when checking tickets. I have made some very good friends of teachers & their families.

At the end of a long visit, one of the teachers asked what I missed most from home - it took 15 minutes to decide - a decent computer. Don't miss TV or radio as both in Sydney are pretty crappy. There are only a few Aussie beers worth drinking & I prefer Thai beer anyway. For meals, I generally do the cooking - here & there. When I started going to the village, some of the women would drop by to see what I was cooking & have a sample. Yes, I'm known about the area, but am not sure if this is a good thing ;-)

One thing I found there that I'm not fond of is the practice of putting ice in beer. My family keep beer in ice for me at parties & the shop over the road is told a few weeks before I come back so she keeps 1/2 carton in the fridge for my first day & has at least 2 cartons on hand for me to ake home. The beer is a few B cheaper if we get cartons from Chaiyaphum, but I like to try to keep money in the area - and she is happy to get the beer and keep it cold for me. (kob khun khrup, Yoong).

Sometimes it does get a little boring & I NEED someone who has decent English to chat with - I guess most of us get like that. Ah, well - knock the top off another Chang. Oh, no!!! It's not breathing! Quick - mouth 2 mouth.... :-)

On thing - could you please put your areas or nearest large town in the post somewhere? I'm having trouble finding some of the villages on the maps.

Edited by pgs

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Has anyone experienced the decibels of a Thai "celebration".

We have had a couple of "full bore" parties at the house. Where most of the village turn up.

Considering how peaceful the place is day and night. The noise generated is collosal.

On the day before our wedding a tractor arrived towing the PA speakers.

(The size of this trailer could have carried a couple of cars - Plus the speakers were double stacked)

I presumed they just brought the whole rig and ran a few speakers as needs required.

We are talking a PA for a rock concert in a fair sized park.

Everything was set up and the music came via cd player to amps and speakers.

Coloured lights were fixed everywhere that lights could be fixed.

This little piece of Thailand now resembled a Close Encounters set!

The "day before" music was playing and the village was getting cranked up for a party.

The women were dancing to and from the house and the pick up full of food was being prepared for the wedding day.

More than a dozen charcoal burning (chimney pot) stoves were glowing away as the food bubbled and simmered. Grinders for stripping the flesh fom coconuts were operated by teenagers whilst the men clinked their favourite bottles of whiskey.

The atmosphere was relaxed but you could tell by peoples' grinning daft expressions that this was going to be a blaster of a do!

At ten the music stopped.

Come midnight you could tell a common consensus was reached...

...Off to bed...conserve yourself for tomorrow!

I was shown to my room.

The house reluctantly joined the rest of the village.

Silent

Pitch black

Sleeping.

I lay awake. Like a message in a bottle, way out to sea. Important, yet totally divorced from my surroundings.

I did all I could to prepare myself for the following day...

As I opened the latch on the door and strolled over to the edge of our land. I stood emptying my bladder under the dome of the milky way. The distant flash of aircraft marker lights, high in the night sky, a tentative link with where my (and our) journey started. The silhouettes of the palms and tamarind tree, now Mine in a sense. The chirping and fizzing of my insect neighbourhood.

Twenty four hours ago I was in Sukhumvit Road, part of the roaring, racing city.

My lonely nocturnal needs sated, I returned - Back to my bed and into a solid, Singha sleep.

Whaaat!

It is technically dawn. The PA thirty feet from my teak bedroom bursts into life with the Thai version of Guns n Roses!

No dingling of bells or polite tapping on the door - Just a complete onslaught of noise!

This...I am told...Is the sign for the people to wake up and come start cooking etc.

I don't know how many miles away they are living but it sure must be a long way.

It is 4 to 5am. With a PA thumping out about a thousand watts!

Well, Farang.

This, is IT!

to be continued...

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Cheers wongsa,

Yes I have had the pleasure of the fantastic "rolling Thai Stereo". I had one for our wedding in our little moo ban 60km north of Korat. Here is a photo.post-14263-1161602821_thumb.jpg

I was visiting a friend on the other side of the moo ban, about 200m away, and I hear some LOAD LukTung. I love LukTung and Morlam. All of a sudden she jumps up and starts yelling the stereo is here!!! the stereo is here!!!I have to say when we went back over to my wife to be's home my ears began to hurt from the high decibles of the thing!I told her it gets turned down a notch,which she did not understand until I said need more quiet, or I am out of here.Well they did turn it down a notch if only a little notch. But what the heck it is a party for the whole moo ban not just me. :o

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righty let me get this straight......

you people wake with sunrise, wander round your vast land then grab a bite to eat. Chill a little and fill the dog bowls with water, then chill a little further til lunch. A light lunch then tuck into a good book on the decking til tea. Couple of hours on the net followed by an early night with your Thai lady...

My question is, will they let me in at the gates? :o

Sounds like heaven

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righty let me get this straight......

you people wake with sunrise, wander round your vast land then grab a bite to eat. Chill a little and fill the dog bowls with water, then chill a little further til lunch. A light lunch then tuck into a good book on the decking til tea. Couple of hours on the net followed by an early night with your Thai lady...

My question is, will they let me in at the gates? :o

Sounds like heaven

It is..... and everyone is welcome..... but few get here :D

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Who of you got married at the house?

Tuxedo at the Grand Hilton...... no thanks.

post-15958-1161619936_thumb.jpg

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Shortly after my wife and I got married in Berlin we went to visit her family in Nongwahyai, near Nonbgualamphu, Isaan. After spending the first few days looking in vain for a chair to sit on, and having got over the sore bum and tender ankles from sitting on the floor all the time, I thought the area was absolutely idyllic and vowed that this was the place I would want to retire to. On our second visit, 2 years later, I still found the village and the area quaint and pleasant... but perhaps no longer quite so idyllic.... and on the third visit the dogs in the village barked every sodding night and so got on my nerves, that I swore I would never settle down there!!!!!!! We´re visiting Thailand for 3 weeks as of 18th November but will be heading (also) across to investigate the area between Chonburi and Rayong, with an eye to possibly settling down there later. I would certaiinly want to spend a lot of time in Isaan and Nongwahyai - but it doesn´t have to be permanent!!! :o I realize that barking dogs are a problem everywhere in Thailand... but village life on the whole was a little too quiet for me to have every day...........................

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Living in Muang Phon in KK provence for 3 months solid was a real eye opener for me. Hubby calls me monkey from thos days as I was poked, prodded, pointed out & spied on like a monkey in a cage by the locals.

I know the sight of a 6ft farang women with blond hair & big boobs is an unusal sight but neither one of us expected that I could stop traffic when riding on the bike or cause all play time at the local school to stop when I passed.

I eventually got used to being called aunt falang by the kids who lived in my street & being touched by every old women in town (breasts included! :D) but the more unpleasant aspects were the local police man following me around 7-11 everytime I went & another one (cop) trying to break into the house whilst hubby was out paying golf! :o

That said, it was still a fun experience & apart from feeling quite isolated (don't know about men but women need other women around & none of the local ladies spoke English) was a great learning curve for me about "real" thai life. :D

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