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'Krabi's economy will die'


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'Krabi's economy will die'
PRATCH RUJIVANAROM
THE NATION

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Akradej Chakjinda, left, and other activists from the Protect Andaman from Coal Network, have been on hunger strike since July 10 in front of the Tourism and Sports Ministry in protest over the proposed Krabi coal-fired power plant.

Tourism on Andaman coast will be ruined if Egat coal plant goes ahead: protesters

KRABI: -- THE upcoming bid to find a builder for the Krabi coal-fired power plant - before completion of an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) - is seriously wrong, the Protect Andaman from Coal Network has said.


The Electricity Generating Au thority of Thailand (EGAT) is due to call for bids for the Krabi coal plant on Wednesday.

Akradej Chakjinda and Prasitchai Nu-nuan, activists from the Protect Andaman from Coal Network, have staged a hunger strike since July 10 in front of the Tourism and Sports Ministry in protest at the controversial power plant construction plan.

"What we are trying to achieve here is to raise public awareness that the process to build an 800 megawatts coal-fired power plant in Krabi has been revealed in an ambiguous way. [We] ask the prime minister to stop the project that will destroy the people's way of life, local health, ecology and tourism in Krabi," Akradej said.

He said that the previous three public hearings into the project were passed without proper public participation, as locals who will face direct impact from the power plant had been ignored. The third hearing, last year, even had a military presence to guard against the local movement, he said.

A coal-fired power plant is planned to be built on the site of an original 340 megawatts fuel oil power plant in Krabi's Nua Klong district. The project has faced strong opposition since it was announced in a 2010 Power Development Plan (PDP). If it goes ahead, the plant would start generating power in 2019.

The network says it will launch a big rally on the same day of the Krabi coal-fired power plant bid, but the exact plan has not been revealed.

"We have tried all methods to protest the building of the coal-fired power plant but the government has never listened to us. So we have to stage a hunger strike as the final measure to show that the local people, the way of life and Andaman tourism will die if the Krabi coal-fired power plant is built," he explained.

He pointed out that the new power plant would bring disastrous effects not only locally - but tourism along the whole Andaman coast would |be hit hard for the benefit of coal |dealers and industrialists.

"We found that 87 per cent of tourists from 37 countries would not come back to Krabi if there was a coal-fired power plant. The core economy of the province would collapse as it relies mainly on tourism which makes up to Bt60 billion a year. Tourism along the Andaman shore, which brings in Bt300 billion, will suffer as well," he said.

In reply to EGAT's claim that the South has no power stability, he said the claim was not true as the South had the ability to generate power from alternative clean sources.

"In Krabi alone, there are 26 biomass power plants from palm oil, which together can generate up to 2,000MW - equal to three coal-fired power plants," he said.

"If the government supports this alternative source of power, it will not have to build the expensive and |polluting coal-fired power plant but just promote local farmers who plant palm oil."

He concluded by asking whether the government was really trying to protect the public interest or protect industrial groups and coal dealers, while leaving local people to pay the price.

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Krabis-economy-will-die-30264792.html

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-- The Nation 2015-07-20

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One of the most worrying things about this government is the number of spending projects (from this to high speed trains and the Gulf of Thailand ferry projects) being announced without proper environmental or economic viability studies. I guess the defense in years to come as the s__t hits the fan will be that it got good ratings on the Friday night TV show.

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'He concluded by asking whether the government was really trying to protect the public interest or protect industrial groups and coal dealers, while leaving local people to pay the price.'

I take it this is a rhetorical question?

Reminds me of Germany in the seventies. Then there was a huge movement against nuclear power plants. The result today: The power companies transfer these plants into new "companies", which have by no means the money to dismantle the old power units, nor the money, or a site to store the radioactive waste properly. The final bill will be paid by the public, as always.

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It is possible to have "clean coal". The problem is that coal is chosen because it is so cheap, and a clean plant is expensive.

It's just like the people near the gold mine who were poisoned, and have heavy metals in their blood. I do not expect anything beyond maybe relocating those living down wind of the plant, which because of monsoons is two directions, not one.

This government is taking a step in the right direction, but never taking any second steps, never stepping on their friends' toes, and stepping all over any non-influential villagers.

Cut it out -- these guys are playing dirty for the 18th time....I would think any rational human being would learn from the repetitions of history, but many TVF posters seem to rush to defend the current junta in the name of a cause they would never support in their home countries.

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Why is a solar plant under consideration? Why is the dirtiest alternative the one they're going with? There should never be another coal fired plant built in the world.

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Is it because it is coal fired and therefore polluting? Or is it because it will be an eyesore? Will we be able to see lovely coal barges delivering the coal? And how about strewing the islands with coal dust to make more interesting than the boring sand coloring that they now have?

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One of the most worrying things about this government is the number of spending projects (from this to high speed trains and the Gulf of Thailand ferry projects) being announced without proper environmental or economic viability studies. I guess the defense in years to come as the s__t hits the fan will be that it got good ratings on the Friday night TV show.

I think whats worrying is there is a section within the government that wants every square inch of land to be converted to something "economically usefull". So expect more Factories, more power plants, more shopping centers, more condominiums, more hotels,and less natural lands.

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powerplants in any location not Eco friendly,

But Krabi is playing here the game:

better the garbidge, waste, everything on the mainland,

and take only the good things,

PM - give them the chance to generate electricity on their iland with their own money !!

Problem solved , it's Krabis problem !!

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powerplants in any location not Eco friendly,

But Krabi is playing here the game:

better the garbidge, waste, everything on the mainland,

and take only the good things,

PM - give them the chance to generate electricity on their iland with their own money !!

Problem solved , it's Krabis problem !!

Just to clarify Mango, Krabi is not an island, it is part of the mainland.

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powerplants in any location not Eco friendly,

But Krabi is playing here the game:

better the garbidge, waste, everything on the mainland,

and take only the good things,

PM - give them the chance to generate electricity on their iland with their own money !!

Problem solved , it's Krabis problem !!

Krabi is not an island, also there is already an existing power plant in place, they want to change it from fuel powered to coal powered.

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The South is finally growing and fast.

The need for power in the south is obvious by the outages experienced in the past.

Coal or Natural Gas are the only viable option at the present time.

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It is so characteristic of this regime, to consider a proposal such as this one. Historically, vision has never really been a quality of most Thai administrations. But, this one seems to lack vision even more than most. Building a huge coal fired plant in a major tourist area, in a country that thrives on tourism income, at a time when tourism seems to be dropping? Is that sheer insanity? Have they completely lost their marbles? Is there no ability to see the forest beyond the trees? Are they even remotely aware of their lack of vision? My guess is that their level of awareness is quite low. It would have to be, to even consider something like this. There are a dozen alternatives to a coal fired plant. And a hundred other places they could put it. Wow. What can one say? Give Little P. the non visionary award.

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