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MH370: Plane wreckage found in Indian Ocean tested

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US official: Debris in photo belongs to Boeing 777
By JOAN LOWY and LORI HINNANT

WASHINGTON (AP) — Air safety investigators have a "high degree of confidence" that a photo of aircraft debris found in the Indian Ocean is of a wing component unique to the Boeing 777, the same model as the Malaysia Airlines plane that disappeared last year, a U.S. official said Wednesday.

Air safety investigators — one of them a Boeing investigator — have identified the component as a "flaperon" from the trailing edge of a 777 wing, the U.S. official said.

A French official close to an investigation of the debris confirmed Wednesday that French law enforcement is on site to examine a piece of airplane wing found on the French island of Reunion, in the western Indian Ocean. A French television network was airing video from its Reunion affiliate of the debris.

The U.S. and French officials spoke on condition that they not be named because they aren't authorized to speak publicly.

At the United Nations, Malaysian Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai told reporters that he has sent a team to verify the identity of the plane wreckage.

"Whatever wreckage found needs to be further verified before we can ever confirm that it is belonged to MH370," he said.

If the debris turns out to be from Malaysia Airlines flight 370, it will be the first major break in the effort to discover what happened to the plane after it vanished on March 8, 2014, with 239 people on board while traveling from Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia to Beijing. A massive multinational search effort of the South Indian Ocean, the China Sea and the Gulf of Thailand came up dry.

A comprehensive report earlier this year into the plane's disappearance revealed that the battery of the locator beacon for the plane's flight data recorder had expired more than a year before the jet vanished. However, the report said the battery in the locator beacon of the cockpit voice recorder was working.

Investigators hope that if they can locate the two recorders they can get to the bottom of what has become one of aviation's biggest mysteries. The unsuccessful search for Flight 370 has raised concern worldwide about whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

Apart from the anomaly of the expired battery, the detailed report devoted page after page to describing a flight that started off completely normal.

The 584-page report by a 19-member independent investigation group went into minute details about the crew's lives, including their medical and financial records and training. It also detailed the aircraft's service record, as well as the weather, communications systems and other aspects of the flight. Nothing unusual was revealed.

The 777, first introduced into service in 1995, had had an enviable safety record up until Flight 370. The only prior fatal crash was of an Asiana Airlines flight while landing in San Francisco in 2013 that was later attributed by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board to mistakes by the flight's pilots. Two passengers were killed in the crash and a third was run over by a truck.

Four months after the disappearance of Flight 370, another Malaysia Airlines 777 was shot down over rebel-held portion of Eastern Ukraine, killing all 298 aboard.
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Hinnant reported from Paris. Associated Press writer Edith Lederer at the United Nations contributed to this report.

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-- (c) Associated Press 2015-07-30

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Malaysia sends team to verify plane wreckage
Malaysia has sent a team to verify whether plane debris washed up on an Indian Ocean island could be part of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, its transport minister said on Wednesday.

UNITED NATIONS: Malaysia has sent a team to verify whether plane debris washed up on an Indian Ocean island could be part of missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, its transport minister said on Wednesday (Jul 29).

The washing up of the mysterious plane debris on the French island of La Reunion prompted swift speculation that it could be part of the missing aircraft.

Full story: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/malaysia-sends-team-to/2016844.html

-- Channel NewsAsia 2015-07-30

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

You're right. But their reluctance might be because it's a for fee process and they don't want to pay for it.

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In today's society it is not always smart to make locations known, there is more to it.

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

You're right. But their reluctance might be because it's a for fee process and they don't want to pay for it.

Sorry, but that is not negotiable in this situation. Why bother with seat belts and life preserving equipment on board either in that case?

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

I'm surprised so little has been made of the reported sighting of low flying large aircraft on day of incident over the Maldives - which is in direction of Reunion Is? Surely some of the millions spent on scanning the ocean floors off Perth could have been directed towards that?

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

You're right. But their reluctance might be because it's a for fee process and they don't want to pay for it.

I doubt he's right. I mean c'mon how many times has this this happened and what will be the frequency in the future? A tamper-proof and ultra-reliable ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) would be just as effective providing the airlines can keep the batteries up-to-date. On the other hand, opening up a high-volume, full-time data path to large passenger plane has some interesting possibilities and a way to make more revenue for the airlines - see next paragraph.

Besides, the data bandwidth has to be allocated for much more important items such as porn, pop music videos, pirated/downloaded movies, Windows OS releases, social media and, last but not least Time Team episodes.

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

I'm surprised so little has been made of the reported sighting of low flying large aircraft on day of incident over the Maldives - which is in direction of Reunion Is? Surely some of the millions spent on scanning the ocean floors off Perth could have been directed towards that?

Except that the electronic evidence, i.e., signals from the aircraft to the engine manufacturer that the engines suffered fuel exhaustion abeam Geraldton in Western Australia, a long way from La Reunion or the maldives.

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In 16 months, a piece of wing could drift a long way also.

Currents from the west coast of Australia circulate right around and flow past the Reunion Islands and Madagascar. I would not be surprised at all if this is wreckage from the missing plane.

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

You're right. But their reluctance might be because it's a for fee process and they don't want to pay for it.

I doubt he's right. I mean c'mon how many times has this this happened and what will be the frequency in the future? A tamper-proof and ultra-reliable ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) would be just as effective providing the airlines can keep the batteries up-to-date. On the other hand, opening up a high-volume, full-time data path to large passenger plane has some interesting possibilities and a way to make more revenue for the airlines - see next paragraph.

Besides, the data bandwidth has to be allocated for much more important items such as porn, pop music videos, pirated/downloaded movies, Windows OS releases, social media and, last but not least Time Team episodes.

The current system requires satellite interface. It does cost.

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Thats not quite right , about the Perth or WA location, it was said by a english satellite company that there was 2 possible scenarios ,1 was an arc of their satellite that ventured the plane to the north-west to around india way and 2 the other to WA ,they said it would most probably gone south due to no reports of it crashing in the north. But you are right, there were reports of a plane flying low of its colours and at the right time around the Maldives. It beats me why there wasn't at least some respect by the aviation authorities to investigate this. Maybe as some say there might be a conspiracy to this.

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whether airliners should be required to transmit their locations continually via satellite, especially when flying long distances over the ocean.

im surprised they even need to think about

I'm surprised so little has been made of the reported sighting of low flying large aircraft on day of incident over the Maldives - which is in direction of Reunion Is? Surely some of the millions spent on scanning the ocean floors off Perth could have been directed towards that?

The report from the Maldives was investigated and the aircraft sighting identified as belonging to a local regional airline, not MH370

i

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