Jump to content
BANGKOK 23 February 2019 01:32

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

webfact

Public acceptance in nuclear power is key to building such plants in Thailand

Recommended Posts

Experts say public acceptance in nuclear power plants is the most important indicator of a possibility of such a plant in Thailand

BANGKOK, 29 July 2015 (NNT) – The Nuclear Society of Thailand (NST), the Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University and the Ministry Of Science and Technology jointly held a seminar on “Is Nuclear Power Plant Safe?” in an effort to educate the public about advanced nuclear technology and raise public acceptance in the technology.


Speakers at the seminar included nuclear experts from the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the Faculty of Engineering of KMUTT, the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAEP), the Seub Nakhasathien Foundation and Image Plus Communication Co., Ltd.

The speakers widely shared their opinions over the establishment of a nuclear power plant in Thailand. They admitted that domestic demand of power would be doubled in the next twenty years. This prompted all sectors in the country to think thoroughly how to deal with the higher demand, and nuclear power was one of the potential solutions.

The current demand of power in the country is at about 60,000 megawatts but domestic supply contributes only half of the amount, or 35,000 megawatts. 70% of the power supply is from natural gas; 17% from Lignite; 10% from renewable energy, and 2.2% from hydropower. The rest is imported from the Lao PDR.

EGAT said in the seminar that any construction plan for the power plant must base on three factors - production stability, environmentally friendly benefits and reasonable investment.

One of the speakers cited Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha as saying in his televised program last Friday that impacts of nuclear power planta must be studied carefully in all aspects, starting from now along with plans for their use in the future. All advantages and disadvantages must be taken into account with understanding and support from all stake holders.

nntlogo.jpg
-- NNT 2015-07-30 footer_n.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More wasted oxygen......whilst a couple major players...Japan & Germany have decided to stop or reduce their dependence on nuclear energy, Thailand would be indebted for decades if only 1 power reactor was constructed.....and that after 10-20 years planning and developement.

Whether Thailand would be permitted to purchase the source is a major factor also.

The Philipines have a reactor, albeit rather old technology nowadays, but have been unable to purchase fuel for obvious reasons.

Renewable energy is the way of the future.....definately not coal, not nuclear......!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they ever get around to building a Nuclear Power Plant here in Thailand,

I will be on the first plane out.with someone like Somchai Simpson at the

controls. Lets see how they get on with the Fast Trains first !.

regards Worgeordie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All complete tosh, of course, and, with Thailand's track record of "safety" (not to mention the security aspect as well), no-one in their right minds would ever countenance such a potential disaster waiting to happen.

This regularly recurring theme is solely about Thailand wanting to "play with the big boys"..............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The day Thailand operates a nuclear reactor will mark my last day in the Kingdom.

A country which to date cannot operate a functioning, safe, pedestrian crossing system within its urban areas is not one yet ready for the storage of radioactive material.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear residents of Krabi,

after reading your submissions against a coal fired power station, I have decided to kill two birds with one stone. My plan is to buy an about to be de-commissioned Russian nuclear sub, refurbish it with a coat of paint and moor it at Krabi pier. Its reactor will be used to power a steam turbine generator set mounted on the pier and connected to the grid. Not only will it supply ample energy, we will promote it as a tourist attraction, and if conflict should arise, it can be uncoupled and used to defend the nation.

Yours, P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get these so called geniuses to visit Fukushima and see how thats going 4 years and still not under control .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More wasted oxygen......whilst a couple major players...Japan & Germany have decided to stop or reduce their dependence on nuclear energy, Thailand would be indebted for decades if only 1 power reactor was constructed.....and that after 10-20 years planning and developement.

Whether Thailand would be permitted to purchase the source is a major factor also.

The Philipines have a reactor, albeit rather old technology nowadays, but have been unable to purchase fuel for obvious reasons.

Renewable energy is the way of the future.....definately not coal, not nuclear......!

Renewables are fine except when it's night time or when there's no wind. Oh and yeah, they'll need to make 3/4ths of the land area of the country available for solar and wind farms as well. So dream on !

Please read the story carefully. Thailand IMPORTS almost half of it's electricity! That presents a very big risk to the country. In the case of disruption of those supplies.

Nuclear is a sensible option. There is no reason for people to fear nuclear power plants. More people die each day from coal fired power plant emissions than have died from nuclear power plants in their entire history.

The Japanese accident is a perfect example. They have about 50 reactors.....49 of them were fine after the earthquake. Yet the one that was damaged was built in a tsunami danger zone that never should have been built there to begin with. That is, it was not cause by a design fault, but by the wrong location.

Technology no provides much safer reactors than the type built 30 to 40 years ago

China has several commercial nuclear reactors operating, and there safety standards are no better than thailands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The day Thailand operates a nuclear reactor will mark my last day in the Kingdom.

A country which to date cannot operate a functioning, safe, pedestrian crossing system within its urban areas is not one yet ready for the storage of radioactive material.

Well goodbye then because Thailand already has a functioning nuclear reactor in Chatuchak. It was comissioned in 1961 and has been operating from 1962 until today.

So don't let the door hit your dumbass on the way out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More wasted oxygen......whilst a couple major players...Japan & Germany have decided to stop or reduce their dependence on nuclear energy, Thailand would be indebted for decades if only 1 power reactor was constructed.....and that after 10-20 years planning and developement.

Whether Thailand would be permitted to purchase the source is a major factor also.

The Philipines have a reactor, albeit rather old technology nowadays, but have been unable to purchase fuel for obvious reasons.

Renewable energy is the way of the future.....definately not coal, not nuclear......!

The problem is that energy is required now, and in the near future. The closest (AFAIK) to a totally renewable energy grid is Tasmania, with a small population, heaps of mountains and rain for hydro, and located in the roaring 40s. Thailand doesn't have those advantages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thailand already has a functioning nuclear reactor in Chatuchak. It was comissioned in 1961 and has been operating from 1962 until today.

Can you site your sources please? I haven't been able to find anything that verifies your claim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The day Thailand operates a nuclear reactor will mark my last day in the Kingdom.

A country which to date cannot operate a functioning, safe, pedestrian crossing system within its urban areas is not one yet ready for the storage of radioactive material.

Well goodbye then because Thailand already has a functioning nuclear reactor in Chatuchak. It was comissioned in 1961 and has been operating from 1962 until today.

So don't let the door hit your dumbass on the way out.

The functioning nuclear reactor at Atom for Peace is a small boiling water reactor.....used for reaearch only.....hardly worth a mention, as these quite common in developing countries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^And that answers my question as well. I was searching for power generators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...