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BANGKOK 17 August 2019 19:34

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webfact

Public acceptance in nuclear power is key to building such plants in Thailand

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Lets try wind powered turbines first, take baby steps.

It is amazing how far behind almost (almost) everyone in this alleged discussion is.

Wind powered turbines have been producing electricity into the national grid for years. Chatuchak's functioning, accident-free nuke reactor effectively powers most of the x-ray machines in this and neighbouring countries. Bangkok's nuke plant ALSO produces the isotopes for probably the most modern and efficient food irradiation plant in Asia, which is why so much Thai food is certified for export.

And yes to some ignoramus up there ^^ rice is irradiated and is, indeed "nuked" before it leaves for most markets, including the US. The government doesn't deny it - the government brags about subjecting rice to radiation, along with tonnes of fresh fruit and vegetables. It's almost impossible that you haven't eaten some of that fine radiation yourself since so much of it gets on the local market, by design.

With current knowledge and possible public/private spending, enough electricity to meet demand will not, CAN not be produced from the standard, unimaginative methods so tiringly brought up over and over - wind, solar, waves.... It can NOT meet demand for generations, and that's if there are technological inventions and development we currently know nothing about. We may be able to adapt, but not (say) in 20 years.

In that 20 years, nuclear COULD be set up to be sustainable for many, many further generations. I doubt strongly it will be, but the thing is I *know* wind/solar/wave won't be. And I know you're as eager to charge your phone from a plug-in charger as I am, and as eager to watch a ball game on your electric TV set as I am and as joyful to log on to Thai Visa on your new-fangled electric computer as I am.

That's why the marvelous, developed carbon plants will be used into the foreseeable future. They are all that actually work, now or in the near (50-year) future, except for nuclear which most people view as most people here view - with a combination of ignorance and uninformed opposition - which will drive actual events anyhow. I've got well past hating nuclear ignorance, it's just a fact and it will drive government policy for now, for which I'll shrug and breathe that lovely coastal coal-flecked air from the power plant along with y'all.

Tell me more about the BKK reactor powering X-Ray machines in TL and neighbouring countries . Because I don't believe you.

Tell me more about the irradiation plants; do they use Cobalt or Caesium isotopes? Or something else? Because I don't believe you again. In any event, do you really not see a difference between the risks present in producing radiation sources for food plants and uranium based power-stations? Really?

Does Chernobyl not ring a bell somewhere in your mind? Fukushima? Three-mile island?

The point is that the education system in Thailand produces neither well-educated people nor competent people. This is indisputable. And yet you seem to be saying that they're OK with X-Ray machines so that's good enough. You cannot be serious.

Another irrelevant rant as per usual.

Chernobyl etc do ring a bell...of course they do.

Do not the deaths from car accidents prior to the introduction of seat belts and air bags also ring a bell.

Of course they do.

Thailand produces neither well-educated nor competent people. This is indisputable.

Really??.....who do you think runs the oil refineries and power plants in Thailand?

You seem to be very similar to a previous poster who simply cannot accept that the cold war is over and now needs to move on to another cause to satisfy whatever is lacking in your sad life.

If ytou're going to engage in ad-hominems lad, try to be more articulate.

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Hmmm. You aren't really doing your case for supporting the level of Thai education and competence any favours if you don't know the difference between an amp and a volt. Apart from that, your rant was... interesting .----Red queen

Your quite correct Red Queen----- I don't know the difference between the 2......& I am not even khon Thai--maybe I should just stick to the shoe tying analogy, I do get a little depressed the way the colonials tend to view the "Natives" especially on this forum.....in the short time I have lived here (16 years) I have been around so many competent Thai people, in different professions. Even down to the girl in the bar who left school at 12 & speaks 4-5 languages--mainly to the farang who after 20 years here still finds it difficult to order a beer in Thai.

I find this country such a nice place to reside in----I just get blown away by the people that get up every morning, just looking to post something negative about it.

Well, it was obvious you don't know the difference and yes, perhaps you should stick to tying shoe-laces rather than posting BS. a good man knows his limitations and works within them

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Shirtless, just curious, when you last at Fukushima?

Shirtless or anyone else doesnt need to visit ..............not recommendedunsure.png

You only need to listen to people like Pippa Jones speaking with Australian ocean-going yachtsman Ivan MacFadyen in May............

Host: What about sea birds and all of that?

Macfadyen: As you get closer up to Japan they’re all gone, they’re not there anymore… Everything’s all gone, it’s just like sailing in a dead sea… there’s nothing…

Host: After Japan you headed [to] America, did you see any impact from…Fukushima?

Macfadyen: It’s dead. That’s where I coined the phrase, ‘The ocean’s broken’ – because, for thousands of miles, there’s nothing. No birds, no fish, no sharks, no dolphins, no turtles… they’re not there… all those beautiful creatures, they’re just all gone… We’d seen a whale, round about probably 1,000 miles [off] Japan, just lying on the surface with like a big tumor… just behind its head… it looked like it was going to die… it didn’t try to get away, it didn’t flap its tail, it didn’t do anything… It had such a profound effect on me… Just talking about it makes me feel like I want to cry.

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Tell me more about the BKK reactor powering X-Ray machines in TL and neighbouring countries . Because I don't believe you.

Entirely your choice. But where do you think the isotopes come from, if not from that nuclear reactor? I choose not to tell you more because the information is so easily available and then you don't have to trust me about it at all. The isotopes come from somewhere. Find out where.

Tell me more about the irradiation plants; do they use Cobalt or Caesium isotopes? Or something else? Because I don't believe you again. In any event, do you really not see a difference between the risks present in producing radiation sources for food plants and uranium based power-stations? Really?

Same answer here. Your belief has nothing to do with it and does not affect the quite modern food irradiation plant. You can CHOOSE not to believe, there's not a thing I can — or want to — do about that. I personally don't *believe" anything at all on this subject but I do know some facts, and know how to find more.

Here's something I do believe, though. I believe you also know how. If you actually do not know, tell me and then I'll show you - but of course you won't trust me because you BELIEVE I made a false statement. Why not prove I did? Or didn't?

Tell me more about the irradiation plants; do they use Cobalt or Caesium isotopes? Or something else? Because I don't believe you again. In any event, do you really not see a difference between the risks present in producing radiation sources for food plants and uranium based power-stations? Really?

Does Chernobyl not ring a bell somewhere in your mind? Fukushima? Three-mile island?

The point is that the education system in Thailand produces neither well-educated people nor competent people. This is indisputable. And yet you seem to be saying that they're OK with X-Ray machines so that's good enough. You cannot be serious.

Nuclear power has clear dangers, risks.... and others that are not entirely clear such as terrorist attacks. Yes, it has dangers. So does every form of producing energy. Coal in Krabi has ENORMOUS risks, much greater than nuclear. The risk of terrorism or similar is very real there, and in Songkhla. But that's just a one-off comment, not all that germane. Yes, of course you are right - nuclear power has risks, but it also instills massive, irrational fears in people that aren't justified but are as real as your strange beliefs. We're not Vulcans, but we can be MORE logical than 80% of this thread.

As I say, I don't think nuclear stands a chance in Thailand or in most places. I think it should, but it probably won't. Even though more people died in Ted Kennedy's car than at Three-Mile Island.

X-rays are not generated with isotopes so what you claimed about Thailand supplying X-ray fuel for surrounding countries seems unlikely. Food irradiation in Thailand is done using X-ray accelerators not istopes as far as I'm aware so it is just as unlikely. And the reactor at NINT is a 53-year-old 1.3mw rector that would struggle to power 80 houses.

Apart from that, you were right on the money. No more from me on this though, my BS detection machine is going into overdrive. But be my guest, have the last word, which I'm sure will be ad-hominem because that would fit.

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If ytou're going to engage in ad-hominems lad, try to be more articulate.

If you are going to be critical...learn to spell.

My apologies for hitting a nerve...lad.

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Please..please Thailand...start first with renewable energy (wind, solar, water, waste, lors... )

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If ytou're going to engage in ad-hominems lad, try to be more articulate.

If you are going to be critical...learn to spell.

My apologies for hitting a nerve...lad.

Touche.

Whoever you think I am, I'm not. Try to control your automatic responses, they're probably wrong.

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X-rays are not generated with isotopes so what you claimed about Thailand supplying X-ray fuel for surrounding countries seems unlikely. Food irradiation in Thailand is done using X-ray accelerators not istopes as far as I'm aware so it is just as unlikely. And the reactor at NINT is a 53-year-old 1.3mw rector that would struggle to power 80 houses.

Apart from that, you were right on the money. No more from me on this though, my BS detection machine is going into overdrive. But be my guest, have the last word, which I'm sure will be ad-hominem because that would fit.

Oh dear.

A 1.3 milliwatt rector? Or was that reactor?

Like a AAA battery perhaps.

Glad there were no "istopes" involved

Love it....from the same person who vilified another poster who didn't know the difference between an Amp and a Volt.

Love it!

Lad

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Those that refer to Chernobyl, Fukushima, Three Mile Island, etc. are all referring to ancient nuclear plant designs. Actually, Three Mile Island was a success story of safety systems that protected the plant from a major disaster. Fukushima would not have been a problem if the original designer of the plant was required to consider tsunami effects on the plant. Unfortunately, that was not one of the design requirements. Nuclear power plants are a very viable solution to power demands in any country. However, the country that intends to build one must comply with all of the safety requirements. There is sufficient knowledge existing today to make a very safe nuclear plant. If Thailand commits to complying with all of these safety standards, then there should be no reason to be concerned. Those people that work with EGAT are not the same people that manage pedestrian crossing systems, as mentioned in response #6 above. I have worked with EGAT in the past and found their people to be very capable engineers. I would put my faith and trust in these people. Those that think EGAT is not capable of managing a nuclear power plant (or even a coal-fired power plant, for that matter) probably have no knowledge of the skill levels of those working for EGAT now. I fully support nuclear power in Thailand's future. I also fully support renewable engery, like wind and solar, but these are very costly options at this time and need to be phased in with other options as well. EGAT is smart to be thinking about fuel diversification as their present power generation scheme relies too heavily on gas and purchased power from neighboring countries.

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X-rays are not generated with isotopes so what you claimed about Thailand supplying X-ray fuel for surrounding countries seems unlikely. Food irradiation in Thailand is done using X-ray accelerators not istopes as far as I'm aware so it is just as unlikely. And the reactor at NINT is a 53-year-old 1.3mw rector that would struggle to power 80 houses.

Apart from that, you were right on the money. No more from me on this though, my BS detection machine is going into overdrive. But be my guest, have the last word, which I'm sure will be ad-hominem because that would fit.

Oh dear.

A 1.3 milliwatt rector? Or was that reactor?

Like a AAA battery perhaps.

Glad there were no "istopes" involved

Love it....from the same person who vilified another poster who didn't know the difference between an Amp and a Volt.

Love it!

Lad

Well. my post clearly says mw (that's megawatt to the poorly educated, milliwatt is something different, which you ought to know if you got past 3rd-grade). Perhaps I should have written MW or Mw for the intellectually-challenged, but really, would anyone actually build a 1.3 milliwatt nuclear reactor? I thought it was obvious but perhaps not to all. My apologies for over-estimating you.

It's like teaching quantum mechanics to my dog sometimes, or a mud crab, they seem to be paying attention but they're only wondering what time dinner is.

As for spalling; don't let one 'touche' go to your head lad, my keyboard is Thai (so of course it doesn't work well) and I don't usually use a spall-chacker, perhaps I should.

None of which alters the apparent fact that the poster I was actually replying to was either lying or is just as challenged - but then at least he didn't think there was a 1.3mW nuclear reactor in Thailand.

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The day Thailand operates a nuclear reactor will mark my last day in the Kingdom.

A country which to date cannot operate a functioning, safe, pedestrian crossing system within its urban areas is not one yet ready for the storage of radioactive material.

Well goodbye then because Thailand already has a functioning nuclear reactor in Chatuchak. It was comissioned in 1961 and has been operating from 1962 until today.

So don't let the door hit your dumbass on the way out.

I think you've got your wires crossed somewhere Seekingasylum. Chatuchak is a radioactive waste management center with a small research reactor that is in no way connected to the national grid. See http://www.wmsym.org/archives/1997/sess13/13-33.htm and also a report on energy consumption in Thailand for 2013 (latest I could find) which outlines the current status of Thailand's nuclear power programme which as you will see is still at the discussion stage https://www.iaea.org/NuclearPower/Downloadable/Meetings/2014/2014-03-17-03-21-WS-INIG/DAY3/COUNTRY/Thailand_v1.pdf.

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"a Honda Click with a sidecar flipped over today carrying nuclear waste material near Bangkok... The driver ran away but was soon turned himself in. When asked why he was using a scooter to carry the nuclear waste material he said his uncles Toyota pickup truck would not start."

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Sorry but I just don't see the Thai infrastructure and mentality supporting the dedication and attention to detail and incident reporting that a nuclear power plant requires.

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