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Paying for Visa


true66

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Someone help me on this query please.

I am doing a trip to Cambodia by air leaving from Bangkok to Phnom Penh, on an Aussie passport. I read that most seem to pay for visa on arrival with US$.

Do they accept payment with Baht or Aus $.?

Also coming from Cambodia by air back to Thailand. I am presuming I get 30 more days staying in Thailand. Am I correct?

Thanking you.

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In addition to visa, everything else in PP will also be in dollars. Thai baht are accepted in areas near the Thai border, but not in PP.

You can also get visa online with credit card, see https://www.evisa.gov.kh/. Costs a little more but saves time at airport and also a page in your passport.

As to second part of question, yes, you get another 30 day visa exempt entry into Thailand on your return, assuming you are from one of the countries eligible for that.

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Dont change too much. Money changers in pp at the market charge considerably less than Thai banks. You can also change Aussie $ into Khmer riels. This is the official currency. We had a discussion here on the board some time ago. Look it up. You are likely to save some 2 % on most sales (but not on museum tickets - they are in USD). Buy small bills in Thailand, they are often a bit cheaper than the USD 50/100 bills. Plus you will need the smaller bills in PP. If you are not in a rush and not too much burdened with luggage: You can use the public aircon bus to the center. it leaves close to the airport gate (200 meters max from the terminal door). Cost: less than 75 cents.

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Hi Mike2011, Thank you for your information. First time for me to Cambodia. Was a bit confused to why they don't accept their own currency for visa at airport, and from what I gather US$ is used in the country, not like Thailand with their Baht.

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Their own currency is >4,000 to 1 US and doesn't come in very large denominations. So it is impractical to use it for things costing much more than say $10-$15, though it is widely used -- and indeed more practical -- for small ticket items.

Basically the way it works is that the riel are the small change (up to and including amounts equal to say $10 - $15) and the dollar is used for more expensive things. US currency does not exist in denominations less than $1 (no coins here) so you will always get change of less than $1 in riel and often also get change of up to a few dollars in it automatically.

So really its a dual currency system. Hotel bills, restaurants (other than cheap local eateries), visas, phone cards, admission fees to temples etc = USD. Food at cheap local eateries, roadside stands, small items at the market etc = riel but they'll accept small denomination USD too as well as a mixture of both currencies.

You don't really need to change into local currency IMO as you will automatically acquire it in the form of change as you go along, at least I always do. If you do change it, not more than say $20 worth. That plus the change you'll get in rile over time will keep you well supplied.

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Or as suggested, just pay online with a credit card. Though you will need some initial USD for travel from the airport etc. I'd change just a small amount (either of banht or of AUS$) in Thailand to then head to a money changer in PP for a better AUSD--> USD (or TBH--> USD) rate than you'll get in Thailand.

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Applying right now for an eVisa.

eVisa website says it now costs $30 +$7 processing fee, but when it comes to payment the credit card agent seems to want $40 and there does not seem to be an alternative to that - just a coice of two agents and a choice of SGD or US$. Hope I've got the right official website (pretty sure I have and have looked around on the google front page for any evidence it is not official!). It's a bit mealy-mouthed of Cambodia to make big announcements of the cost, complete with oficail government-stamped letters confirming it ..... and then charge a hidden $3. Neither here nor there in real terms of course.

Also there are few apparent restrictions on the style photo, which is good if correct. The only digital photo I have to hand is one where I am smiling rather broadly. Again - hope that flies!

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I've never had a problem. And yes, it does come now to $40.

And neither did I. The photo was accepted. The visa was issued within 12 hours of pressing 'pay'. Worth the hidden $3 (Tony Fernandez would be proud*) - very impressive service and I don't want an extra page of my passport consumed, as I always run out with my Laos and Camby visits before my UK 10 year expiry date.

They promise within 3 working days, but they delivered within 12 hours on a weekend. Perhaps the Brits and Aussies should have contracted out to Camby, not VFS.

Had they taken 4 working days I would have gambled and lost 40 bucks.

* Air Asia boss

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Just noticed that my e-visa starts its 30 day course as of today, not next Saturday when I said I would be arriving. Not an issue for me, but watch it if you are a longer-stay visitor (or go for the VOA)

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That 30 days is the time period within which you have to use it by entering the country.

The 30 day clock for duration of stay starts ticking only on the day of arrival and your entry stamp will reflect this. (there is also an option of a one month extension)

I too have always had a very quick turn around with evisa.

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