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Favorite Buddhist Books (not Suttas) And Reference Websites

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“Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes For A Buddhist Revolution” By David R Loy

"David Loy's Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution might have a flashy title, but it is a serious and substantial book that poses real challenges to the reader. The book builds on a theme that Loy has working on for several of his last books—namely, that the three poisons are so intricately built into our society (greed in the market economy, anger in the military industrial complex, and delusion in the fame-chasing omnipresent commercial media) that awakening needs to happen in the social as well as the personal realm. This places the book firmly in the realm of Engaged Buddhism. However, its overarching theme concerns how to ensure that the Buddhadharma survives and flourishes in the West. Loy argues with conviction that in order to have relevance in the West, the dharma must find the middle way between its many traditional Asian forms and the contemporary Western feel-good consumerism that characterize much of today's spiritualism."—Buddhadharma

http://www.wisdompub...Sex,+War,+Karma

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“Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes For A Buddhist Revolution” By David R Loy

"David Loy's Money, Sex, War, Karma: Notes for a Buddhist Revolution might have a flashy title, but it is a serious and substantial book that poses real challenges to the reader. The book builds on a theme that Loy has working on for several of his last books—namely, that the three poisons are so intricately built into our society (greed in the market economy, anger in the military industrial complex, and delusion in the fame-chasing omnipresent commercial media) that awakening needs to happen in the social as well as the personal realm. This places the book firmly in the realm of Engaged Buddhism. However, its overarching theme concerns how to ensure that the Buddhadharma survives and flourishes in the West. Loy argues with conviction that in order to have relevance in the West, the dharma must find the middle way between its many traditional Asian forms and the contemporary Western feel-good consumerism that characterize much of today's spiritualism."—Buddhadharma

http://www.wisdompub...Sex,+War,+Karma

Have you had a chance to read it yet? Sounds inspiring. One review:

http://www.westernbu...-war-karma.html

I just downloaded the book from Amazon.

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Not yet. I hadn't heard of it before I heard that the author would do a talk on the subject in Bangkok.

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I look for the Dhammapada in Thai. I have 11 translations in English, German and French.

But no one in Thailand knows about. I want to give English teaching in a Branch of Suan Mokh Wat in our Province for young monks using the Dhammapada.

Do you have a e-book download for me?

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A Mindful Nation: How a Simple Practice Can Help Us Reduce Stress, Improve Performance, and Recapture the American Spirit

Publication Date: March 27, 2012

In one of the most optimistic books to come out of Washington during these trying times, Congressman Tim Ryan presents us with an inspiring and hopeful view of our country’s future—and a roadmap for how to get there. Across America, people are feeling squeezed, exhausted, and running faster and faster while falling farther behind. The economy continues to struggle, wars rage on, and every week brings news of another environmental disaster. Everything seems broken and people feel helpless to make a difference. Despite this bleak outlook, there are strands of quiet hope and confidence. People are beginning to take action in a new way: they are slowing down, paying attention, and gaining an awareness of the inner resources at their disposal.

This new way is based on the timeless and universal practice of mindfulness, the natural capabilities of our brains and minds, and the core American values of self-reliance, stick-to-it-iveness, and getting the job done. And it’s manifesting in every sector of our society—it’s helping sick people work with their pain, school children improve their learning, veterans heal from trauma, and CEOs become more inclusive and effective leaders. All these benefits—and more—are supported by scientific research on mindfulness that is regularly reported by the mainstream media, such as ABC World News with Diane Sawyer.

In
A Mindful Nation
, Congressman Tim Ryan—an all-American guy from the heartland who is also a thoughtful, committed leader—takes this story about the benefits of mindfulness to the next level. He connects the dots between what’s happening with mindfulness in the classrooms, hospitals, boardrooms, research labs, and army bases across the country by sharing his interactions with experts in education, defense, health care, criminal justice, and the environment.
A Mindful Nation
paints a picture of emerging solutions that both benefit the reader
and
address the societal difficulties we are facing. Ryan’s folksy, warm, and encouraging voice uplifts us and shows that there
is
something we can do right here and right now to help ourselves and our country.

Both inspiring and pragmatic,
A Mindful Nation
shows how the benefits of mindfulness apply to the current challenges that affect each of us in our own lives and in our communities, and thus have implications for our society as a whole. With a hard-nosed understanding of politics, government budgets, and what it takes to get something done, Ryan connects a practical approach—lead with the science, show the savings
and
show how this can help us educate our children to be competitive in the world arena—with a hopeful vision for how mindfulness can reinvigorate our core American values and transform and revitalize our communities.

http://www.amazon.com/Mindful-Nation-Practice-Performance-Recapture/dp/1401939295

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You can find a review of The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk on New Mandala, an even longer one in pdf format here, and the book itself on Google Books.

Very interesting and thorough review. White is very critical of McDaniel's basic thesis. Perhaps he should write his own book :)

I've downloaded the book to my Kindle and look forward to reading it.

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Wow. Available in mobi (Kindle) format too.

Camerata you know I am always happy to convert pdf's to mobi's for you just as long as you don't mind the splattering of random Chinese characters!

Good find Fabianfred thank you.

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There's a book by Luang Ta Maha Bua where he talks about this, though he speaks from the p.o.v of a forest monk, so it may sound blunt to some.

I believe this is in the excellent biography of Ajahn Man, although it could be in Patipada. The relics of Ajahn Man can be seen in a building that looks like a Christian church at Wat Pa Sutthawat in Sakhon Nakhon.

I can't remember which one - lol, sanya ... both books are wonderful - especially Patipada. Anyone interested in the ways of the Dhutanga monks spanning from Luang Sao and Mun onwards would more than likely enjoy it. It was given to me by a monk who stays at the temple of the translator of the book mentioned above. It gave a a restored sense of well-being and encouragement during my first pansaa. Anywhere I went, there it was, in my bowl.

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Patipatta and other books by the author of this one..plus others about Maha Boowa are on the site linked to above in the first post.

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