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What does teaching experience in Thailand get you?


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As others have noted, a 4 year degree and a state certification are typically mandatory for a teaching position in any of the 50 states in the US. Under the "No Child Left Behind" act requirements were further tightened, requiring teachers to be highly qualified for the subject they teach.

If you meet those conditions (degree, certification, highly qualified) there is no particular reason you cannot be hired. The question then is whether you will receive credit for the years you taught abroad. If your experience is in an accredited international or American school, whether in Thailand or elsewhere, there's a good chance of it, especially if you're applying for a difficult to fill position. Do keep in mind that many schools cap the number of years accepted for salary placement, typically at 10 years.

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The fact is you will NOT get a job teaching in the USA without a minimum of a four year degree. The experience in Thailand is pretty much worthless and considered a waste of time.

What people need to understand is the longer you stay in Thailand, the older you get. The rest of the civilized first world moves forward with education and technology, whereas Thailand moves backward. There are tons of college graduates in the USA each year for the schools to choose from that are 22 years old with a bachelors degree or more.

From my own experience, I lived in Thailand for 10+ years. I had an advanced education before I left, worked in the same field (engineering), yet when I decided to come back to the USA, where before I could get a job easily, many companies looked at my time in Thailand as nothing but wasting time. Only through contacts was I able to get back into the corporate door at a high level.

I have to admire the people that move to Thailand and tough it out to the end. I had the same intentions, however, after having a family my priorities shifted to their best chance which I felt was not in Thailand.

Our son attended Prem International in Chiang Mai, which at the time was well over 400,000 baht a year. Upon coming to the USA, he was way behind his class in English and Math.

For me it was a simple decision of wanting more for my family and having our son educated in the USA, where he will have a chance at making more than 15,000 baht a month when he graduates from Uni.

There are no easy answers however Thailand is not looked highly upon by any other nation in the world unless you count corruption, prostitution and human trafficking.

Seems employers always think the worst when they find out you were in Thailand for a long time.

There were other international bording schools in CM, choosing one of the most expensive and suspect international teachers, as you found out was not a wise choice.. regardless of all the bells and whistles they threw at you.. Yes, a nice campus in the hills.

Has you child caught up in his studies? So many other expats, who settle down here and have families end up returning home for the quality of education...

Returned to USA and will not return to Thailand

The school here in the USA has the tools and my son has caught up

Knowing what I know now, I would never have stayed in Thailand as long as I did.

Some people are ok with their kids graduating from Thai Uni making 15,000 thb per month; not me.

For our son, the best option is US education and that is more important than living in Thailand

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As usual most of the posters replying here are the "all TEFLers are dickheads" brigade, with no actual knowledge of the requirements to be a teacher in the western world.

We all know that some TEFLers have "circumvented" the system by lying about their quals etc.

However it is untrue that if you can't legally teach in Thailand then you cannot teach in your homeland.

The qualifications required for TEFL teaching in Thailand are way higher than those in the UK.

I do not have a degree and thus am not able to satisfy the legal requirements in Thailand at present, but did teach there for many years previously when the rules were different and was then allowed to continue due to the "grandfather" system.

Back in the UK I teach ESOL in Colleges and Universities with an RSA CELTA but no degree. Many recruiters ask for a degree and a DELTA but that is what they would prefer and they are perfectly willing to take lesser quals, especially if the teacher has a good c.v. and references and especially hit them with a good demo lesson. Of course the better paying jobs go to those with the best quals but the demand far exceeds the number of teachers.

The various TEFL sites on the internet have dozens of TEFL positions in the UK, far more than can be filled by degree and DELTA holding candidates. Most of the work is in London and other major cities. So accommodation costs can be a problem.

You can also sign up with Protocol National or a similar organisation and you can get sub teaching work in schools. You will need to obtain a DBS, basically a police check, Not my favourite type of employment, if you think Thai teens are unruly, you will be eaten alive by the UK comprehensive school teenagers.

Rates of pay are around £16-20 per hour TEFLing or £100 plus for a day subbing in schools. If you can a fully contracted job with a good language institute you can look for £25,000 plus and benefits.

Private work is also an option and of course internet teaching is becoming increasingly fashionable.

I always find it interesting that people with no degree think they are smart enough to teach others because of a certificate?

A 4 year Uni degree in English from the USA versus your certificate?

I know who I would rather have teaching my kid.

You fill the void of economic teacher. A role that is filled so the company can make money and make money only.

I do not see the school hiring you direct? A recruiter will hire anyone because that is how THEY get paid.

You are kidding yourself if you think you have the same knowledge as a degree'd teacher.

People that speak English are not teachers and have no qualifications to be teachers.

If you did have the proper credentials to be a real teacher, you would be teaching in a real school and it would have taken you four years in UNI to get all the required English language skills

Teaching ESOL on a contract for that measly pay is exactly what is.

Anyone that has an advanced degree or has kids in school understands exactly the requirements to be a teacher.

Don't for a minute think you are smarter or more qualified than a degree'd teacher because you are not.

Students get screwed by uneducated people walking around with a piece of paper they earned in 30 days claiming to be teachers.

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On 10/11/2015 at 5:36 PM, 50baht said:

I would not put any work experiance in Thailand on resume. It will get you on THE LIST.

.hardatit.jpg

If you are ever thinking of teaching English, I suggest you make sure to learn proper English spelling first.

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If the US is anything like the UK, there should be plenty of TEFL jobs available and TEFL experience in Thailand should be as good as experience gained in any other country. The pay (in the UK) is not much better than Thailand though.

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16 minutes ago, sugarcane24 said:

If you are ever thinking of teaching English, I suggest you make sure to learn proper English spelling first.

 

Did you really need to exhume this poor long dead thread to criticise someone's spelling?

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On 11/11/2015 at 7:40 AM, maewang99 said:

being a good teacher means instilling a love of learning in at least some of your students. you can learn to do this. in Thailand, it is not only a very difficult task to accomplish for many reasons and, not least of which, because of large classroom sizes.... but Thai culture and education in Thailand is more about obedience and compliance than about the occasional gift of a genuine learning experience. this may be why copying things, handing in homework, wearing uniforms, pretending to respect the ajarn etc etc is very important here. so it is really difficult to see how experience in Thailand is "teaching" is at all useful elsewhere. most of what I learned in the UCLA TEFL program before coming here was not at all applicable here. it really is a system to graduate those students who 'do the stupid stuff' diligently and are good at rote learning. this is good for training medical doctors and factory workers... but not the kind of folks that make western culture, economies and the people themselves what they are. so much so most Thai place a fairly high value on sending their children, as well as themselves, to faraway geographical locations where there are predominately western people instead of Thai. they call it going overseas etc to get a western education... but it's really about being in a different culture.

I believe we tend to discount how important literacy is. in most of the world, reading books ranks in the top 10 leisure activities, easily. usually only outranked by travel. in Thailand, outside Bangkok in particular no one hardly ever reads a book of any kind. I have to assume Bangkok is a bit better because I guess so, I have never lived there, and only visited briefly... but the only Thai readers I know of are all from Bangkok (and it is one fellow, only one guy, the same guy every time at family funerals that I meet). that's quite an indictment.

it shows up in everyday life. the ability to think in the abstract is what makes us more than just another mammal species with a consciousness. but we have language. and it is most powerfully developed by reading good books and gaining new perspectives. everyday life isn't as filled with this kind of abstract thought processing, it tends to be more concrete and 'real'...... which is how animals live. like my dog, who I keep well fed, happy and play with. I can't help it, I still think to Abhisit Vejjajiva, while Prime Minister saying, or reportedly saying, that the most important thing for the Thai public school system is that the students are happy.

that's how I treat my dog.

Teachers have quite a high social status in Thai society I suspect because their important role in turning intelligent children into government-operated robots, respectively cogs in the state machinery, is appreciated by TPTB and their underlings. If I value my three years of teaching in Thailand before I retired it is because of the insight into this it gave me.

 

Delving into this issue further, I came to realise that schools anywhere in the world are basically indoctrination centres used to programme children with the lies which keep this corrupt and evil system pervading virtually every aspect of human life on this planet  going.  Seen in this light, so-called education is just another form of government/psychopathic elites-sponsored organised crime designed to dumb down the population. What do a school of fish and children in a school have in common? The fish and the children are both disconnected from their own brain and controlled by a mind outside themselves. 

dumb_dees.jpg

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5 minutes ago, sugarcane24 said:

Teachers have quite a high social status in Thai society I suspect because their important role in turning intelligent children into government-operated robots, respectively cogs in the state machinery, is appreciated by TPTB and their underlings. If I value my three years of teaching in Thailand before I retired it is because of the insight into this it gave me.

 

Delving into this issue further, I came to realise that schools anywhere in the world are basically indoctrination centres used to programme children with the lies which keep this corrupt and evil system pervading virtually every aspect of human life on this planet  going.  Seen in this light, so-called education is just another form of government/psychopathic elites-sponsored organised crime designed to dumb down the population. What do a school of fish and children in a school have in common? The fish and the children are both disconnected from their own brain and controlled by a mind outside themselves. 

dumb_dees.jpg

 

3 minutes ago, sugarcane24 said:

Sorry - I didn't notice the date. If I had, no I wouldn't have.

 Have you seen this one?  You should post your comment in it.  You will find far more people to discuss it with.  All the best.
 

 

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