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BBC says Thailand is among 7 top places in the world to live after retiring

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BBC says Thailand is among 7 top places in the world to live after retiring

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BANGKOK: -- Thailand is among the world's top seven countries for retirees to live as it has everything they need and want to make retirement life affordable, according to BBC.

A travel article written by BBC’s author Rob Budden this week said a growing number of pensioners are seeking far-flung destinations.

They’re lured by hours of sunshine, a slower pace of life, favourable tax rates, and the prospect of a more fulfilling lifestyle where their income goes much further than it does at home.

Considered carefully, retiring abroad can deliver all of the above without compromising home comforts or quality healthcare, he wrote.

He then guided seven best countries to retire from from tropical towns in Thailand to coastal comforts in Central America where he said they have it all.

The seven best places to live after retirement are Panama, Ecuador, Malaysia, Spain, Malta, Portugal, and Thailand.

For Thailand, he wrote that “Known as the “The Land of Smiles”, Thailand offers expats retiring here plenty to smile about — a low cost of living, tropical clime, culture that respects older people plus no tax on RETIREE income from abroad.

International Living magazine ranked the country as one of the cheapest in its cost of living index, buoyed by competitive property prices. Eating out remains reasonable with a typical Pad Thai lunch available from just $1.

As well, the country’s retirement visa, which is renewable annually, is available to all retirees with monthly pensions of 65,000 Thai baht ($1,800) or to pensioners depositing 800,000 baht ($22,125) in a Thai bank account.

While the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office rates many private hospitals in Thailand equivalent to western standards, it says standards at local hospitals can vary. Retirees should therefore budget to pay for local health insurance.

Further he wrote that a low cost of living, no tax on retiree income from abroad, a tropical climate and a culture that respects the elderly — what’s not to like in this retirement destination known as “The Land of Smiles”

Thailand is also the land of affordable living, according to International Living magazine. It ranked the country as the second least-expensive in its cost of living index, pointing out that an “over-the-top” luxury two-bedroom condo with great views can be rented for less than 40,000 baht ($1,200) per month. A Pad Thai lunch can be had for $1.

However, you should budget to pay for local health insurance as, while the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office rates many private hospitals to western standards, the group notes that standards at local hospitals vary, he noted.

Source: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/bbc-says-thailand-is-among-7-top-places-in-the-world-to-live-after-retiring

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-- Thai PBS 2016-01-08

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Yes, it is quite easy as a retiree in Thailand (and many other low cost countries), when you enjoy a steady if not spectacular income, to lead a good life. The situation changes somewhat when you develop an emotional attachment to the country and its people. Then life becomes about your empathy and concern for other people and their living conditions. The "sunny retirement" articles tend to gloss over these possibilities, which are inevitable for many of us.

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Thailand is good for retirement. As long as your single and have health insurance! Other wise could be expensive!

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Problem is with 65 years of being babysat somewhat in most of their respective countries, many retirees come over here ill prepared for the potential hazards of living in Thailand. Some of the dumbest moves I have seen over here in the last 12 years or so have been done by people old enough to know better, not sure in every case a late start is a good idea..............

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so little money for retirement, people soon will go to Ethiopia.

The visa situation is a nightmare there. So no, they won't.

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Thailand is great for retirement if you are prepared to live in a bubble. Live your own little life cheaply and happily and ignore what's going on around you. Things that are not likely to affect you much, like the blatant day to day corruption that permeates Thai society from top to bottom. The injustices of the legal system. Better not venture out onto the roads. Don't care about te Thais that live around you, you know the ones that struggle to live on 300 baht a day (if they're luck), ignore the 'slave labourers' from Burma on the building sites. Oh yes I'm all right Jack.

I wonder -how deep the research these articles by so called 'travel experts' go. Have they ever experienced 'trying to get things done' satisfactorily in Thailand. Have they ever had to jump through hoops at the whim of some surly Immigration Officer, and I'll bet they've never had to pay themselves for private hospital treatment in this Country.

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Why should retirees NOT live in a bubble?

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Yes, come and retire here. Just bear one thing in mind - LOVE IS NOT FOR FREE!

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as to empathy for local Thai.... actually the way it works is.... the longer you are here the more Thai you become. at least for me in a rural village. and so, empathy goes away as you become more Thai like. genuine empathy, the kind that we farlang, and most other kinds of foreigners, value, at least as far as I can vaguely remember now, as it is not just something drilled into our heads at a "school". so, no problemo. same as Thai.

another thing I ran across today. interesting as I sometimes comment I believe real tourists, i.e. urban Chinese, are not so much here for temples and food but maybe it is that Thailand is seemingly vying to be the world's biggest 21st century 'ethnological exposition'. well, what do you know? if you look up 'Home sapien' on Wikipedia (I was using it for a spell check, not this idea of mine) it shows 2 locals, or at least it did for my settings, along with something about "Middle Pleistocene-Present" whatever that means.

could my 'ethnological exposition' theory actually be serious?

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Articles like this are not helping Thailand.

Yes, it is quite easy as a retiree in Thailand (and many other low cost countries), when you enjoy a steady if not spectacular income, to lead a good life. The situation changes somewhat when you develop an emotional attachment to the country and its people. Then life becomes about your empathy and concern for other people and their living conditions. The "sunny retirement" articles tend to gloss over these possibilities, which are inevitable for many of us.

I like this insight. Sadly it's why so much passion for the country gets misread as hate, cynicism or Thai bashing. Then there are the daily practicalities:

Thailand is great for retirement if you are prepared to live in a bubble. Live your own little life cheaply and happily and ignore what's going on around you. Things that are not likely to affect you much, like the blatant day to day corruption that permeates Thai society from top to bottom. The injustices of the legal system. Better not venture out onto the roads. Don't care about te Thais that live around you, you know the ones that struggle to live on 300 baht a day (if they're luck), ignore the 'slave labourers' from Burma on the building sites. Oh yes I'm all right Jack.

I wonder -how deep the research these articles by so called 'travel experts' go. Have they ever experienced 'trying to get things done' satisfactorily in Thailand. Have they ever had to jump through hoops at the whim of some surly Immigration Officer, and I'll bet they've never had to pay themselves for private hospital treatment in this Country.

...that often give rise to the genuine hate, cynicism and Thai bashing.

The article is out of touch in its reference to the Land Of Smiles. It reads like one of those websites encouraging gap year kids to go find their 'dream job' teaching English, money making by selling dreams. The article is mostly devoid of any real worth and paints a skewed picture.

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Superficially (a bit like the BBC report) Thailand is a great place to live....just don't look too deep, the country is a bit like a Thai motorcy... blinged up wheels sparkly chrome and stickers everywhere..all the bits on show but underneath a Knackered engine ..wai2.gif

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Superficially (a bit like the BBC report) Thailand is a great place to live....just don't look too deep, the country is a bit like a Thai motorcy... blinged up wheels sparkly chrome and stickers everywhere..all the bits on show but underneath a Knackered engine ..wai2.gif

It's a fantastic place for a vacation.

Living in Thailand didn't agree with me so much though except when I was making frequent trips to worse places like S. Korea, Taiwan, Bangladesh, Yemen etc......

It was pure heaven to come back to Thailand.

Last go-round was living on the Darkside of Pattaya, in a really nice house, 3 br, 2.5 bath place with nice beautiful year round breezes on Khaotalo.

Postage stamp sized lot, nosy neighbors, neighbors with yapping poodles, gossip out the wazoo (nosy folks), soi dogs everywhere, utterly chaotic traffic on Soi Khaotalo, an ex Special Forces guy at every pub nearby - most of whom were broke, Koh Larn got developed, Chinese and Russians arrived en masse over the past decade (I have no problems with them as people... but did they all have to show up at once?).

I have family ties to Thailand and will always return, but don't think I'll retire in Thailand.

Then again, I have a gypsy bug. I doubt I'll ever retire to any place in particular.

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