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TDRI supports PM Prayut's double-decker bus ban

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TDRI supports PM’s double-decker bus ban

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BANGKOK: -- Thailand Development Research Institute (TDRI) has voiced support for the directive of Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha forbidding new registration of double-decker buses and requiring all registered double-decker and single-decker buses higher than 3.6 metres to pass gradient test.

Failing to pass the required test, they will no longer be allowed to run though they have been legally registered.

The directive came as road accident fatalities remained high in the country and the prime minister was determined to ensure full safety for bus passengers.

A TDRI academics, Dr Sumet Ongkittikul, the research director for Transportation and Logistics Policy, lauded the prime minister’s directive but advised that a practical safety model must be designed that is comparable to international tip-over standards for any vehicle that exceeds the 3.6 metres height limit for passenger buses.

According to the researcher, the minimum requirement internationally is for vehicles of this type to be able to withstand gradients of 30 degrees.

He said this is particularly important for double-decker vehicles that have been registered prior to January 1, 2013 which amount to almost 7,000 vehicles.

The Land Transport Department had earlier stipulated that these vehicles must pass new safety standards by January 1, 2018.

However after the directive from the prime minister, the deadline is now moved forward to January 1, 2016.

But surprisingly, he said after an outcry was raised by the Thai Transportation Operators Association, a new deadline was announced yesterday.

Significantly there was an obvious absence of clauses that stipulate the time requirement needed for these older vehicles to pass gradient tests. In other words, no clear deadline has been specified which means that passengers still face the risk of possible tip-over with these vehicles, he said.

The TDRI wants the results of these tests to be made public as well as the registration number of the vehicles that have actually passed alongside those of vehicles that failed the tests, he said.

According to the new announcement by the Land Transport Department, vehicles that were registered prior to January 1st, 2013 are not required to pass the new gradient tests.

However, a new directive issued by the Prime Minister vetoed this as the public’s safety was at stake. This will force the department to carry out tests on all passenger vehicles irrespective of age, he said.

The ban on new double-decker buses and issuance of safety standards that require all passenger buses to be equipped with GPS monitoring equipment to control their speeds as well as closely monitoring driver conduct is not enough, he said.

What is even more important to the general safety of passengers is implemention of higher standards for structural integrity of all passenger buses in the construction process.

He said these standards must meet all international safety requirements which sadly is lacking in the country.

Finally, the legal consequence for injury or loss of life from accidents involving passenger buses must be harsher in order to guarantee higher standards of operations from operators, he said.

Source: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/tdri-supports-pms-double-decker-bus-ban

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-- Thai PBS 2016-01-08

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I thought it was the drivers of the buses,that caused accidents,

if you go flying around a bend in top gear and cannot slow down,

theres a good chance the bus will tip over.

regards Worgeordie

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I thought it was the drivers of the buses,that caused accidents,

if you go flying around a bend in top gear and cannot slow down,

theres a good chance the bus will tip over.

This are not the drivers. It's the fault of the brakes!

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Dr. Sumet Ongkittikul's recommendation is based on a international safety standard. Safety must supersede profit margins.

Furthermore, double decker buses operate more safe on flat terrain and a trained navigator.

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Dr. Sumet Ongkittikul's recommendation is based on a international safety standard. Safety must supersede profit margins.

Furthermore, double decker buses operate more safe on flat terrain and a trained navigator.

Trained Navigator Where The F are they getting them from,,,,, !

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The legal max. height of such a bus in Europe is 4m. In Thailand they are building those busses to 4.50m. That truly should be stopped.

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Dr. Sumet Ongkittikul's recommendation is based on a international safety standard. Safety must supersede profit margins.

Furthermore, double decker buses operate more safe on flat terrain and a trained navigator.

Trained Navigator Where The F are they getting them from,,,,, !

Maybe from the Air Force? clap2.gif

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The problem being they use the wheel and chassis base of a single level bus. They need to increase wheel base with to ensure stability. I do not think thai roads could cope with a wider wheel base bus. Increase in VCL require wider base.

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The 6 wheeler buses, like the one in the photo, use standard 4 wheeler chassis and consequently do not possess the safety or strength of a genuine bus of those dimensions, as the chassis is narrower for a start. That has been known from the start and has been admitted to by a number of knowledgeable sources. But this is Thailand and it's a case of, 'I see no ships'! Why, because the cost of importing genuine 6 wheelers is not financially viable for the operators.

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There are more seats on top deck than on the lower deck so they are top heavy

Its a bad design

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If they only use the lower deck for luggage is it still rated as a double deck? If they redesigned with seating on the lower deck and luggage space above would that be a double decker?

Sent from my Grand using Tapatalk

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I can't see much happening here...there's just too many already on the roads....and most likely owned by friends of junta and government.....

This is just spin in an attempt to be seen as caring!

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