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Maizefarmer

Growing Makua in Thailand

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Bannork

Thanks for the language lesson - I have to consider that it may well be pronounced as you quite rightly say in Isaan - but the viewers to this forum are all over Thailand, the the majority of people will therefore relate to and recognise Makua beofre they recognise the word Makhia (again english spelling aside - which is always an issue with any word in Thai that does not havean Englisg equivilant, Makua is recognised in Isaan).

Where exactly are you - what town.

I'll get how ever much you want onto a inter-provincial truck tomorrow morning.

You'll have it in 48hours.

Actually Bannork - how much are you intending to start with?

Tim

Not that far from you MF, near a town called Bandung, 80 km north-east of Udon.

Thanks for the sale offer but as we're only starting off with half a rai of makhua, eggplant, first of all, then might as well let the missus and sister-in-law irrigate it with the hose, inspite of your excellent advice\warning about weeds and spores encouraged by spray\ sprinklers.

The missus is keen on chillis, often quoting the 150 baht per kilo figures.

I have an important question MF about the land to be use by makhua.

As it's a 3 or 4 year plant one has to consider the rainy season so what is its tolerance to waterlogged soil? Should it only be planted on well drained soil?

cheers, Bannork.

If its only half a rai - fine use a hose pipe.

Nope - they will not withstand flooded or waterlogged soil. They'll tolerate it for a few days or a week or so - but if its continually waterlogged through the wet season you will loose the plant.

Tim

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Nope - they will not withstand flooded or waterlogged soil. They'll tolerate it for a few days or a week or so - but if its continually waterlogged through the wet season you will loose the plant.

Tim

OK, so I just got off the phone with the stock broker and I'm long on Toray Plastics which makes the plastic paint pails and Naan drippers and short on Talat Thai which is the wholesale market just north of Klong Luang in BKK due to the abundance of Makuas that have flooded the market!!

Seriously though, the wife and I planted hundreds of makua seeds a few months ago and not one of them germinated. We did not at all do it as MF mentioned and we're now in the process of cleaning out the weeds to give it another go as MF suggests.

We have 30 rai of paddy that we rent out for a whopping B1k/rai/year. I'm trying to convince the wife if the one rai makua experiment goes well we should convert at least 15 rai from paddy to makua. She emphatically says "no way" as the paddy land will always be flooded. But I say, we plant the makuas in the plastic pails above the ground and drain the rain water to the pond that's on the property. Then she says "no way".

What do you think? Is it possible to convert rice paddies to a thriving makua plantation?

rgds

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SOMTHAM , just out of interests sake I'll share something with you .... I do online FOREX trading - its my offshore insurance policy - more or less doubles my annual income (the income from which I keep well away from my Thai accounts and figures - and the local tax man).

My style is trading short-term: short or long trades on which can be closed in about 10 - 30minutes - perhaps 1 hour max. Have never kept a position open for more than 2 hours. Can't do that with stocks and shares , but its easily done with the FOREX market which as you proberbly know is open 24hrs a day the whole year - except for Saturday night thru to earlier morning Monday.

Okay .... back to Makua.

Take Note as follows:

1) Read all my notes on growing Makua.

2) They must be germinated in and transplanted from seed trays - the longer you can leave them

in the seed tray the better - and if that means leaving them in till they are 40-45-50cm high then

all the better. Cover them for the 1st week or so while in the seed tray with netting that cuts

back the light by at least 20 -30% and up to 40% will be fine. Purchase 10% netting and double

it over, then at the 2nd week remove one layer and leave for another week, before removing

completly.

3) Note my watering regime - important.

Having said all that I am afraid that you cannot maintain them in rice paddies, as when the wet

season arrives , the soil will become waterlogged and they will die.

However - if you are willing to land fill the paddy then yes - they become ideal locations because they are inevatibly flat and the soil is condusive to equal moisture content across the whole field which encourages equal growth between all the plants. Equal plant growth amongst Makua on the same field is a very postive yiled enhancement characteristic - but we are now getting into complicate dissues related to farming them.

If you are going to go down this route I would suggest that you start off with about 1rai - perhaps 2rai and raise it to at least 18" above the existing bank level which surounds the paddy, or at least 8-10" above the road level that runs along side the paddy - whichever is highest - to ensure good drainage. While Makua will tolerate wet soil, the problem will more be one of the soil bee destroyed as people have to walk along the same routes everyday to harvest the fruit.

Also note, the Thai's will encourage you to plant the Makua closer together - do not, it leads to problems later when the plants have grown and are developed - it results in a high percentage of the leaves and especialy the flowers been covered by foliage of the plants along side - which turn slows down the flower developement (and fruiting rate) as well as providing alot of additional shade for insects to hide in, encouraging pest problems, while making it difficult to apply insecticide effectively (assuming you will be spraying).

........... that was a mouthfull.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Tim

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SOMTHAM , just out of interests sake I'll share something with you .... I do online FOREX trading - its my offshore insurance policy - more or less doubles my annual income (the income from which I keep well away from my Thai accounts and figures - and the local tax man).

My style is trading short-term: short or long trades on which can be closed in about 10 - 30minutes - perhaps 1 hour max. Have never kept a position open for more than 2 hours. Can't do that with stocks and shares , but its easily done with the FOREX market which as you proberbly know is open 24hrs a day the whole year - except for Saturday night thru to earlier morning Monday.

Okay .... back to Makua.

Take Note as follows:

1) Read all my notes on growing Makua.

2) They must be germinated in and transplanted from seed trays - the longer you can leave them

in the seed tray the better - and if that means leaving them in till they are 40-45-50cm high then

all the better. Cover them for the 1st week or so while in the seed tray with netting that cuts

back the light by at least 20 -30% and up to 40% will be fine. Purchase 10% netting and double

it over, then at the 2nd week remove one layer and leave for another week, before removing

completly.

3) Note my watering regime - important.

Having said all that I am afraid that you cannot maintain them in rice paddies, as when the wet

season arrives , the soil will become waterlogged and they will die.

However - if you are willing to land fill the paddy then yes - they become ideal locations because they are inevatibly flat and the soil is condusive to equal moisture content across the whole field which encourages equal growth between all the plants. Equal plant growth amongst Makua on the same field is a very postive yiled enhancement characteristic - but we are now getting into complicate dissues related to farming them.

If you are going to go down this route I would suggest that you start off with about 1rai - perhaps 2rai and raise it to at least 18" above the existing bank level which surounds the paddy, or at least 8-10" above the road level that runs along side the paddy - whichever is highest - to ensure good drainage. While Makua will tolerate wet soil, the problem will more be one of the soil bee destroyed as people have to walk along the same routes everyday to harvest the fruit.

Also note, the Thai's will encourage you to plant the Makua closer together - do not, it leads to problems later when the plants have grown and are developed - it results in a high percentage of the leaves and especialy the flowers been covered by foliage of the plants along side - which turn slows down the flower developement (and fruiting rate) as well as providing alot of additional shade for insects to hide in, encouraging pest problems, while making it difficult to apply insecticide effectively (assuming you will be spraying).

........... that was a mouthfull.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Tim

Interesting on the Forex. I wish I had the knowledge to trade as I know people that have made a lot of money doing it. Maybe in my next life.

I've read every one of your Makua posts and we totally screwed up first time around. The wife was right on with the paddy field. Land fill is expensive around here so we'll stick with the 1 rai next to the fish ponds to get started and continue renting the rice paddies out. I've already cut a 1.5m bamboo stick for the workers for planting at the recommended density.

will keep you posted on progress.

rgds and thanks for your time.

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Yes - the bamboo stick is a big step forward!!!!

.... keep us posted.

Tim

Did you rec. my email?

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Yes - the bamboo stick is a big step forward!!!!

.... keep us posted.

Tim

Did you rec. my email?

I havent checked yet - was it sent to yahoo, hotmail or postmaster?

Tim.

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UDON

Hi - yes I have got it and will reply to you today.

Regards

Tim

quote name='udon' date='2006-10-23 03:15:36' post='952622']

via the email link in yr profile :o

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Maizefarmer

I have been following this thread with great interest which is what I am trying to get my wife to show.

She thinks it is a good idea with a couple of reservations so far.

If we grow too much for the local market where will we sell it.

We need better water supplies.

We have about 10 rai where we live mostly planted with man (tapioca) and we are on a slope so the runoff is OK and the ground does not stay waterlogged, and another 10 rai about 3 km down the road also planted with man. This land has a klong running at the bach so it is possible to get water pumped in the dry season but the main land is rock about 1/2 metre down so we cannot drill for water.

She is talking about growing papaya for papaya pok pok on the second piece of land but I will open another thread about that.

Thanks for the help and information on this thread.

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BILLD766

Hi - I have replied to your in broad terms under the Papaya thread you started. However to recap, you may like to take note of my following comments.

1) You defineatly need water for the Makua - which explains why the price goes up so much in the dry season - because most small scale farmers do not have irrigation. If you dont have irrigation you won't be able to grow them successfully. But, you do realise the same will apply for the Papaya in the dry season. If you wish to grow them successful and on a commercial scale, you will need to have irrigation. Fortuneatly they can both be drip irrigated - i.e. you will not need to pump large volumes at fast rates, which means you can draw off whatever existing water supply there is slowly.

2) Where will you sell the Makua? - you wil not have a problem up to about 4 rai, that I am certain of - where ever you are. Remeber this is a daily crop which will produce for you an average of around 15 kg's per rai per day.

To repeat my suggestion that I posted on the Papaya thread - start off with 1 rai and build up from there on a 1 rai at a time basis. This will allow you to get a feel for the market without overloading it and will also give you a feel for just what is involved in growing this crop and maintianing it.

Even better - because the Papaya has such a small footprint it can be "intercropped between the Makua plants very well indeed.

I would suggest that you plant 1 rai of Makua and inter-crop it every 3 or 4 Makua plants with a Papaya plant - grow both together on the same land at the same time. They go together very well as they have the same water and fertilser requirements.

Tim

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UDON

Hi - yes I have got it and will reply to you today.

Regards

Tim

quote name='udon' date='2006-10-23 03:15:36' post='952622']

via the email link in yr profile :o

Still waiting!

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UDON

Hi - yes I have got it and will reply to you today.

Regards

Tim

quote name='udon' date='2006-10-23 03:15:36' post='952622']

via the email link in yr profile :o

Still waiting!

This is not the first time I have replied to your emails only to find a few days later you have not recieved my reply - its happened before

Sent 2 days ago - in great detail!!

No prob's - I'll right it up again and resend

Regards

Tim

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Tim,

I have never sent you an email from my gmail address, it was via yr profile.....or rec'd one from you.

I gave you my email address in the email 7 days ago (20/10) via yr profile.

I also sent another PM on 25/10 which is still unread.

cheers

udon

Edited by udon

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Udon

Apologies - I am getting myself mixed up here.

The emai l replied to was from Ruud - and that too apears not to have got through.

I will go through all emails to night and re- reply to them - or reply where I have missed them.

Regards

Tim

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