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webfact

Haze starts to cover Phayao despite 60-day burning ban

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Vince, I agree with your position that there is a better way. I also agree with you about permaculture and its potential for Thailand. However the Hugelkultur as you described it, would be very difficult to implement in the hillside areas, where the burning is most prevalent, and in the flats where there are usually no trees.

Here is the reality. Farmers believe they need to clear land on the hillside to plant corn. If it is new land, they have to cut down trees and bamboo, wait a few months and then set it on fire. If it is last years field, which is more often the case, they simple need to burn off whatever grew since last time they cleared it.

In the second situation there is some vegetation, but nowhere near enough for your hugelkultur plan. For the remaining ten percent, which would be people cutting into new jungle. There is vegetation that is felled, but it is all over the hillside. For your idea to work they would have to gather it all up by hand (no machinery can be used on the steep slopes) and put it in a pile in the way you suggested.

If the field was 10 rai, for example, they might have enough for a pile covering 2 rai. And then they need to cover it with dirt. Where are they going to get the dirt? The average amount of topsoil on these hillsides is only about 4 cm. And no farmer is going to strip 8 rai of top soil to make 2 good rai. And on top of that the field would now be open to massive erosion and would become useless as farm land, perhaps indefinitely.

The 2 rai of hugelkultur land would also be in jeopardy because it is also on a slope and likely all the new loose soil would wash away as well; leaving a pile of dead wood, which in a about ten years will be reclaimed entirely by the jungle.

It's a nice idea for someone with a small land holding, but it can't work for farmers here.

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For the most part I have purchased medication from a pharmacist and cut the doctor out of the equation. That has worked quite well for me for the last 40 years but I would not suggest anyone else do as I do.

Ah! I'd forgotten that the pharmacists in Thailand play the role of the GP in the West. wink.png

Maybe I should put it differently. If a Thai official asked me for my personal opinion, I would not hesitate to give it. I don’t, however, feel comfortable going into someone else’s home as an uninvited guest and criticizing how they live. I don’t tell clouds not to rain, rivers not to flow or the wind not to blow. It is up to me to adapt to my surrounding not to insist that everyone and everything change to please me.

You are still confusing me. Are you associating the natural activity of clouds and rivers with the activity of annual burn-off in the Chiang Rai area?

If the pollution from burn-off invades your home and property, you have a perfect right to criticise those who are producing such pollution, sign a petition, put forth proposals for change, and appeal to a higher authority for a solution.

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However the Hugelkultur as you described it, would be very difficult to implement in the hillside areas, where the burning is most prevalent, and in the flats where there are usually no trees.

The Hugelkultur method is only appropriate in situations of deforestation. When agricultural land has already been cleared years ago, then other permaculture methods are more appropriate, which include returning all excess vegetation to the soil, as well as animal manure and processed human septic waste if possible.

Part of the solution to burn-off, is education on the most appropriate permaculture method that applies in the circumstances.

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For the most part I have purchased medication from a pharmacist and cut the doctor out of the equation. That has worked quite well for me for the last 40 years but I would not suggest anyone else do as I do.

Ah! I'd forgotten that the pharmacists in Thailand play the role of the GP in the West. wink.png

Maybe I should put it differently. If a Thai official asked me for my personal opinion, I would not hesitate to give it. I don’t, however, feel comfortable going into someone else’s home as an uninvited guest and criticizing how they live. I don’t tell clouds not to rain, rivers not to flow or the wind not to blow. It is up to me to adapt to my surrounding not to insist that everyone and everything change to please me.

You are still confusing me. Are you associating the natural activity of clouds and rivers with the activity of annual burn-off in the Chiang Rai area?

If the pollution from burn-off invades your home and property, you have a perfect right to criticise those who are producing such pollution, sign a petition, put forth proposals for change, and appeal to a higher authority for a solution.

You sound easily confused.smile.png

I see it as inevitable in the short term and not my responsibility as a foreigner. I simply adapt, like I do to the weather. It won't help anything for me as a foreigner to start yelling at my neighbors and telling them what to do, especially when they have not asked for my advice.

Before someone comes along and decides to lambast me for having an interesting conversation with someone who has different views, this is a civil conversation between consenting adults and generally within an acceptable range of tolerance for being on topic. Please join the discussion if you have an opinion.

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I can assure you all they are still burning rice fields near Phayao. Near our village yesterday at 0530 and this afternoon at 1740.

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You sound easily confused.smile.png

Just being polite, instead of accusing you of being confused. biggrin.png

 

It won't help anything for me as a foreigner to start yelling at my neighbors and telling them what to do, especially when they have not asked for my advice.

Well, I agree on that point. It has to be a community effort. I presume it's not just farangs who are concerned about the air pollution from annual burn-off.

I recall when I first visited Mae Hong Son in February 2012 and went trekking to visit the 'real' hill tribe people, we came across the occasional patch of land which looked a mess, and my guide explained that those areas had been prepared for burn-off, which would take place in a month or so. Refer attached photo.

I really like Mae Hong Son. I even thought of settling there, but the likelihood of feeling the need to leave the place every year during the burn-off period, put me off.

post-118979-0-60271500-1458256676_thumb.

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You sound easily confused.smile.png

Just being polite, instead of accusing you of being confused. biggrin.png

 

I understand that it can be confusing when we encounter people with different views or who don’t just nod their heads and say we are right. I appreciate that we are both being polite and not making accusations.

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It keeps on climbing and this is the highest it has been here this year. No signs of slowing down. Lets hope there is some rain soon. Arent there any inspectors driving around? At the back of my house there are a lot of farm and I can see farmers setting fields on fire.

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1-hr AQI of 148 based on PM10 (1hr index figures do not carry any health advisory, but it's a good way to understand the real-time situation from an index figure)

Bro, I can almost assure you that the PM2.5 1-hr AQI would be like close to AQI 200 based on that. It's well into the red zone probably very close to purple.

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LOS or Lungs of the Sun

take life expectancy and subtract 89273498234732984723 years

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What's going on with the air in CR? I just checked the AQI this morning and CR is at 174--unhealthy. Is it that bad up there?

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please take a moment ....

www.smokethedocumentary.com

A good balanced representation of the problem and how difficult it is to solve. I have a link to that on my FaceBook Page.

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What's going on with the air in CR? I just checked the AQI this morning and CR is at 174--unhealthy. Is it that bad up there?

It is pretty bad but nothing unusual for this time of year. I gauge how bad it is locally by watching the various mountains disappear from view. I have stopped riding my bike for the duration of this smoke season. I recommend the documentary as it explains the situation quite well.

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What's going on with the air in CR? I just checked the AQI this morning and CR is at 174--unhealthy. Is it that bad up there?

It is pretty bad but nothing unusual for this time of year. I gauge how bad it is locally by watching the various mountains disappear from view. I have stopped riding my bike for the duration of this smoke season. I recommend the documentary as it explains the situation quite well.

Yeah, we've got some smokey air in CM as well. Looks pretty bad this morning, actually, but the AQI doesn't reflect. Just wondering what 174 looks like.

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