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No idea if this the right forum for this but I was just wondering what birds people got in their gardens, where are they (town/province), do they feed them and with what?

Not an expert on the local birds but I'm in samut prakarn, area has lots of plaa salid fields, have a khlong next to my house with lots of trees and then fishfields.

In the garden we get very brave collared dove types which aren't bothered by me, different types of mynah birds which are very jumpy, coucals (saw 2 together for the firts time last week), very noisy koels which I rarely see but are very vocal especially at night. In the fields theres a variety of storks. Had a kingfisher a few months back flying up and down the klong...that got me excited.

I always chuck out bread for the birds. The mother in law says they're farlang nok as they don't eat rice she puts out (and no she doesn't mean falang kee nok).

Anything unusual visiting your place? What do you feed them with?

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Managed to get a BIF of a White-throated Kingfisher-hope you like it        

Talking of colourful but common birds, I managed to get this photo about right of a White-throated Kingfisher. Rarely seen near water, happy hunting in fields etc.

Obviously not in my garden, but in Kaeng Krachana NP last week. Also saw a lot of Grey Wagtails which are among the earliest of the winter visitors reminding me that it's time to keep my eyes open in

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we get very brave collared dove types which aren't bothered by me

We get those little gray birds, not afraid they walk around on the ground and have accidently nearly stepped on one on several occasions w00t.gif

Edited by Daffy D
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Dead bird is a Siberian Thrush - I seem to remember Isanbirder already makingt that ID in another thread. The first pic of Storks looks like mostly Openbill Storks with possibly a few Painted Storks. The Coucal is a Greater.

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we get very brave collared dove types which aren't bothered by me

We get those little gray birds, not afraid they walk around on the ground and have accidently nearly stepped on one on several occasions w00t.gif

Zebra Dove most probably. Sometimes they're referred to as Peaceful Doves.

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Glad you started the thread. I moved to a new house in November about 11 km north of Phetchabun. Set in nice rural location with plenty of trees and water nearby.

My "patch" is the garden and anything I can see or hear from the house. I have a north facing first floor terrace that is proving a great spot for bird watching and photography. The terrace is on a level with a large mature tree that attracts all manner of avian visitors, mostly common I might add.

I regularly have visits from a group of Racket Tailed Treepies, a Spot Breasted Woodpecker, a pair of Black Collared Starling and a Violet Cuckoo.

I also had a brief visit from a pair of Black Baza in January.

Less common(here) I have recently seen a Verditer Flycatcher and a Black Crested BulBul, both spotted in the very cold weather that might have forced them down from Tad Mok or Nearby Nam Nao.

Besides the birds I have mentioned all the usual suspects are present i.e Mynas, Bulbuls and Koel for example.

Edited by thetefldon
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Dead bird is a Siberian Thrush - I seem to remember Isanbirder already makingt that ID in another thread. The first pic of Storks looks like mostly Openbill Storks with possibly a few Painted Storks. The Coucal is a Greater.

That's correct on the Siberian Thrush.

How to tell the difference between Greater and Lesser Coucal?

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Dead bird is a Siberian Thrush - I seem to remember Isanbirder already makingt that ID in another thread. The first pic of Storks looks like mostly Openbill Storks with possibly a few Painted Storks. The Coucal is a Greater.

That's correct on the Siberian Thrush.

How to tell the difference between Greater and Lesser Coucal?

Lesser have buffish streaks on their bodies that are quite visible. But they are also generally much more skulking and tend to stay in high grass or reeds near water. If it's hopping around your garden fully exposed, you can pretty much peg it as a Greater.

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we get very brave collared dove types which aren't bothered by me

We get those little gray birds, not afraid they walk around on the ground and have accidently nearly stepped on one on several occasions w00t.gif

Zebra Dove most probably. Sometimes they're referred to as Peaceful Doves.

Cute birds but lousy nest builders

post-35075-0-50504800-1457414211_thumb.j

Must be the local influence whistling.gif

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Huge variety - from that tiny little humming bird size one, always tapping the window as it hoovers up the insects of it, many mid sized like those black and white ones with the large tails that whiz round on the ground to the large mynars, coucals, dove like and pigeons. Their are some large trees next to one of my study windows (top floor). One day there was a large owl sitting in the tree. Didn't bother when it noticed me but watched for a while before getting bored and flying off.

All the birds nick the dogs' food and water that's out outside the kitchen door. One or two even cheeky enough to nip in the kitchen! Dogs don't bother chasing them much now.

We get lots of nests in the trees and the tameness of the birds is surprising although I worry that they are too unworried by humans and cars; not all are friendly.

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Well I've learnt something today: birds like dog food.

Occasionally I've opened up over ripe (for us to eat) bananas and left them in the garden for the birds to eat but they didn't seem interested (I know the field rats love bananas so can't leave the bananas out over night).

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I'm living in the suburbs of Bangkok and I'm always surprised by the amount of different birds and songs in my garden (which isn't big!)! Around my house in the paddy-fields are a lot more.

As I cannot load them all I send herewith the link to my album

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Not my garden ,but went to the local lake for a sneaky small chang today.

And for the second time i saw the same kingfisher.

Its probably nothing to you- but means alot to me

These birds are very shy. I lived in oxford on a beautiful lake in a caravan and only saw this bird once! Anyway- sorry for the rant - as you were !

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If it wasnt for birds, we wouldnt have planes !

Reminds me of that movie 'Those Magnificent Men In Their Flying Machines' Hehe

They are All Relatives Of Dinosaurs !

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I'm living in the suburbs of Bangkok and I'm always surprised by the amount of different birds and songs in my garden (which isn't big!)! Around my house in the paddy-fields are a lot more.

As I cannot load them all I send herewith the link to my album

That's impressive; loved no.15.

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Below is my BKK Yard List (only a 5 minute walk to Sukhumvit Road!)...adhering to the rules set by myself and AjarnNorth, above. Species seen OR heard from the property you reside in, including distant flyovers and heard only. I'm fortunate to have an "oasis" of Old Thailand habitat directly behind my building...including but not limited to mango and jackfruit trees, a banana grove and a klong. My 5th floor lanai affords a wonderful treetop vantage point and alot of open sky, unobstructed by any trees and only a few distant buildings. Have only been in this apartment for a couple months and the list currently stands at 39. It includes some rather nice species...and a glaring absentee or two. Hope others will join in submitting their yard lists...though doubt (m)any of us can compete with the impressive and enviable list of AjarnNorth!



Openbill Stork


Painted Stork


Great Egret


Chinese Pond Heron


Black-shouldered Kite


Shikra


Black-capped Kingfisher


Blue-tailed Bee-eater


Pied Fantail


Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker


Olive-backed Sunbird


Brown-throated Sunbird


Inornate Warbler (prefer this name over Yellow-browed)


Common Iora


Coppersmith Barbet


Indian Roller


Magpie Robin


Palm Swift


House Swift


Barn Swallow


Red-whiskered Bulbul


Yellow-vented Bulbul


Streak-eared Bulbul


Plaintive Cuckoo


Lesser Coucal (heard)


Greater Coucal


Common Koel (Nok GowWow)


Blue Rock-Thrush


Plain-backed Sparrow


Tree Sparrow


Common Myna


White-vented Myna (Javan Myna)


Pink-necked Pigeon


Zebra Dove


Spotted Dove


Rock Dove


Black-naped Oriole


Black-collared Starling


Large-billed Crow


Edited by Skeptic7
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The wife took this photo (with iphone) of an owl in our garden wall (khlong, trees, fishfields behind the wall). What type of owl is it, and is it adult or juvenile?

attachicon.gifIMG_2238.JPG

Collared scops Owl.

Is it a native or visitor to Thailand? I ask as i couldn't find much about it and Thailand on the web, but i know the local collectors around me keep them (my barber 200 m for example keeps them and eagles) so was wondering was an escapee (wouldn't be the first escapee in my garden).

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