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Yes...same in the States people report seeing hummingbirds which sometimes turn out to be Hummingbird Moths. Sphinx Moth they are called there. I have a pic or 2 taken in Florida. Will post when I locate them

Edited by Skeptic7

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Great humming bird pics, Skeptic.

I'd say that 9 times our of 10 when someone in Thailand thinks they have seen a humming bird it's one of the sunbirds. (the other 1 out of 10 have usually seen a hummingbird hawk-moth, though nor perching and eating aphids!)

Where are you Dick Dasterdly.

I live on the South end of Phuket and would love to identify the 'wren type' bird seen every now and again. Unfortunately, I can't provide any better description as its small, moves quickly and its always largely hidden by the trailing plant leaves.

Came as news to me that there are no humming birds in Thailand! Back on Phi Phi we were eating lunch one day and happily watching what we thought was a humming bird - a small bird hovering whilst sucking up nectar from flower 'throats'. It must have been a sunbird, but was still wonderful to watch!

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As promised, for those who are interested...here are some pix i captured of a Sphinx Moth or Hawk Moth (aka Hummingbird Moth) in central Florida. Sphingidae is the family name and includes about 1450 species around the world...including Thailand. As AJN pointed out, sometimes these moths are mistaken for hummingbirds even though they are considerably smaller...flight style, speed and wing blur are very similar.

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Have a baby monitor lizard hanging out in my garden; it lives in the kitchen drain. Saw it this morning in the area I throw the bread to feed the birds in the garden, it was eyeing up a dove but gave up on it. Five minutes later there was a big commotion alongside our 2m high wall; it was a mynah bird jumping about frantically making lots of noise. Turns out the bird was flying at the lizard repeatedly. The lizard was moving along the wall and being repeatedly attacked. I couldn't make out if in the attacks the bird was picking up and flinging the lizard or the lizard was leaping out of the attacks. Quite a sight. When the lizard had disappeared in to the bushes the attacks stopped. I then went out to see the lizard but it quickly scampered up and over the 2m platered wall. Always know when there's a snake in the garden from the mynahs squawking.

Came back home to see a myhah bird flying at a tree repeatedly. Saw a tail going down the tree. Walked over expecting to see a snake. It was that little monitor lizard again being driven down the tree by the mynah bird. I let the lizard escape. Seems I have an ongoing battle in my garden and the bird is winning.

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Have a baby monitor lizard hanging out in my garden; it lives in the kitchen drain. Saw it this morning in the area I throw the bread to feed the birds in the garden, it was eyeing up a dove but gave up on it. Five minutes later there was a big commotion alongside our 2m high wall; it was a mynah bird jumping about frantically making lots of noise. Turns out the bird was flying at the lizard repeatedly. The lizard was moving along the wall and being repeatedly attacked. I couldn't make out if in the attacks the bird was picking up and flinging the lizard or the lizard was leaping out of the attacks. Quite a sight. When the lizard had disappeared in to the bushes the attacks stopped. I then went out to see the lizard but it quickly scampered up and over the 2m platered wall. Always know when there's a snake in the garden from the mynahs squawking.

Came back home to see a myhah bird flying at a tree repeatedly. Saw a tail going down the tree. Walked over expecting to see a snake. It was that little monitor lizard again being driven down the tree by the mynah bird. I let the lizard escape. Seems I have an ongoing battle in my garden and the bird is winning.

My guess isthe Myna has a nest up that tree with either eggs or fledglings, both of which a monitor will eat so the the Myna is "mobbing" the monitor to chase it away. Attached were taken from my garden, though the tree is just over the wall in the forested lot next to my place. The top of the dead palm had a myna nest in it (they often nest in holes in dead or dying trees). As you can see, the Monitor was raiding the nest and the mynas (there were two) are repeatedly fling in and pecking at the monitor. It was a fairly big monitor so didn't care. The fourth picture is the same monitor, I think, after capture and before relocation. I have caught a few and relocated them for their own good to better environments... also a number of reticulated pythons, a couple monocled cobras, and a host of the snakes. Have a new monitor in the same area last week on the same tree. My guess is it was a pregnant female.

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Edited by AjarnNorth
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How are you catching the monitors? Next to my house is a khlong and then plaa salid fields so we get loads of monitors - common sight seeing them walking down my street and our kids chasing them away on their bikes.

We get loads of mynahs in the garden. I'll go take a look later at the 'battle area' to see if I can spot their nest.

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How are you catching the monitors? Next to my house is a khlong and then plaa salid fields so we get loads of monitors - common sight seeing them walking down my street and our kids chasing them away on their bikes.

We get loads of mynahs in the garden. I'll go take a look later at the 'battle area' to see if I can spot their nest.

With a snake snare, made for me by the local snake guy but very easy to make and use (see below). Somewhere a TV poster posted very clear instructions on how to make your own and his design is better than mine but mine works fine. Best way to find the nest is just watch the Mynas as they approach that tree/area.

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To bring it back around to garden birds, the same tree where the monitor raided the myna nest has been host to a number of happenings. Last year I had two Collared Scops Owls there. Somewhere i have much better pics than these - as they got more used to me, they began showing themselves earlier and earlier and in better light - but these will do for now. The treee used to towe over all the surrounding trees but the top meter or two of has since fell off so the new top is blocked by a lot of foliage from other trees now and harder for me to view from my yard, though I can still get good looks from one or two angles.

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As promised, for those who are interested...here are some pix i captured of a Sphinx Moth or Hawk Moth (aka Hummingbird Moth) in central Florida. Sphingidae is the family name and includes about 1450 species around the world...including Thailand. As AJN pointed out, sometimes these moths are mistaken for hummingbirds even though they are considerably smaller...flight style, speed and wing blur are very similar.

Can't thank you enough for this post as early Sunday a.m. (6-7ish) I was watching some sort of moth flitting about, and then hovering over the climbing/trailing plant flowers around the patio. Immediately, the moth you'd mentioned came to mind!

I was trying to watch more closely (without disturbing it), when a mynah bird flew in and grabbed it....

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Have a couple of mynah birds visiting the bread I put out daily. They are more nervy than all the other mynahs, they always stay VERY close to each other, they seem to just hang about rather than eating. They have like a ruffled head crown (mohican shape like a punk). What type of mynah are they and are they juveniles?

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Been quite quiet on the patch of late with a flyby of a Grey Heron the only notable new comer.

However I have been trying to get some pics of a small bird that I can't identify that has been around for a couple of weeks. There are actually a pair of them and they may well be feeding young nearby, grubbing for insects on the lawn.

Got a few shots today at last. Taken from first floor terrace looking down at the birds.

Your thoughts on ID please.

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Brown Prinia. Graduated tail indicates prinia, and the long superciliary, streaked crown, and almost unmarked underparts narrow it down to species.

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Brown Prinia. Graduated tail indicates prinia, and the long superciliary, streaked crown, and almost unmarked underparts narrow it down to species.

Hoped you might be around. I had it as a Prenia but was unsure. New one for the patch then! 46 now.

Many thanks againsmile.png

Edited by thetefldon

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Brown Prinia. Graduated tail indicates prinia, and the long superciliary, streaked crown, and almost unmarked underparts narrow it down to species.

Hoped you might be around. I had it as a Prenia but was unsure. New one for the patch then! 46 now.

Many thanks againsmile.png

I am confused. I would have these as Plain Prinia. P. Round notes Brown Prinia has an indistinct supercilium, while this bird (or is it birds?) has a very distinct supercilium. Also notes streaked upperparts (not much streaking in these pics) and black as opposed to pink gape; this bird seems to have pink. Robson also has Plain with "long broad whitish supercilium" and Brown with weak supercilium. In addition, notes that Plain has "slightly variable streaking on crown." Illustrations from both show visible streaking on mantle and upper parts of Brown (not just crown) and I can't see any streaking on upperparts in these photos.

Edited by AjarnNorth
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