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Great idea, i'm going to start my list.

We have loads of birds in the garden but i did not think there were many different species, after seeing the other lists it will be interesting to find out.

Can anyone recommend a camera/lens for photographing them.

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Directly outside my bedroom window is a big lime tree. Every morning from about 5 30 am onwards as it starts to get light I am treated to a most spectacular wildlife show of exotic birds. Yes, I do have an eye for the birds. They are not aware of my presence because of the mosquito wire, but I can see them clearly. They are all colours, all sizes and overhead I see flocks of storks flying gracefully way up in the air.

I’ve looked on the Internet to try and determine the species of birds they are but the problem is many appear very similar and it’s hard to tell. I would love to catch them on video but the birds move fast, now you see them then they’re gone and I am no wildlife photographer. I thought about placing a bird feeder on the tree to attract them but I have no idea what they eat. Some could be seed eaters and others live on insects, I really don’t know.

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Directly outside my bedroom window is a big lime tree. Every morning from about 5 30 am onwards as it starts to get light I am treated to a most spectacular wildlife show of exotic birds. Yes, I do have an eye for the birds. They are not aware of my presence because of the mosquito wire, but I can see them clearly. They are all colours, all sizes and overhead I see flocks of storks flying gracefully way up in the air.

I’ve looked on the Internet to try and determine the species of birds they are but the problem is many appear very similar and it’s hard to tell. I would love to catch them on video but the birds move fast, now you see them then they’re gone and I am no wildlife photographer. I thought about placing a bird feeder on the tree to attract them but I have no idea what they eat. Some could be seed eaters and others live on insects, I really don’t know.

I would suggest you buy a Bird Guide or Field Guide of the birds of Thailand. Here's two...

My go to is...A Guide To The Birds Of Thailand. Would also recommend A Field Guide To The Birds Of Thailand

post-216783-14576622895219_thumb.jpg

post-216783-14576623022732_thumb.jpg

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The wife took this photo (with iphone) of an owl in our garden wall (khlong, trees, fishfields behind the wall). What type of owl is it, and is it adult or juvenile?

attachicon.gifIMG_2238.JPG

Collared scops Owl.

Is it a native or visitor to Thailand? I ask as i couldn't find much about it and Thailand on the web, but i know the local collectors around me keep them (my barber 200 m for example keeps them and eagles) so was wondering was an escapee (wouldn't be the first escapee in my garden).

They are resident. Their call is a soft "pooh" which they will repeat at 12 second intervals. They nest in holes in trees. I had two just next to my house which I assumed were nesting and possibly raising young but suddenly disappeared, though I still hear them. Probably their nest was raided by a monitor lizard.

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Great idea, i'm going to start my list.

We have loads of birds in the garden but i did not think there were many different species, after seeing the other lists it will be interesting to find out.

Can anyone recommend a camera/lens for photographing them.

If you're just looking to photo birds but don't want to take on the monumental task of learning about photography and lenses and etc. then look to the fixed lens superzoom cameras. I use a fuji HS35. Make sure you get the manual zoom. Affordable, nothing to learn. I keep mine on auto almost constantly. And if i drop it in a stream or flip in a kayak, they're only about 12000 baht. If you want Nat. Geo quality, then prepare to spend a lot of money. If you just want good clear shots of birds and a good camera you can use for multiple purposes, i highly recommend the Fuji or other fixed lens superzooms. All the photo buffs will say I am wrong.

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The wife took this photo (with iphone) of an owl in our garden wall (khlong, trees, fishfields behind the wall). What type of owl is it, and is it adult or juvenile?

attachicon.gifIMG_2238.JPG

Collared scops Owl.

Is it a native or visitor to Thailand? I ask as i couldn't find much about it and Thailand on the web, but i know the local collectors around me keep them (my barber 200 m for example keeps them and eagles) so was wondering was an escapee (wouldn't be the first escapee in my garden).

They are resident. Their call is a soft "pooh" which they will repeat at 12 second intervals. They nest in holes in trees. I had two just next to my house which I assumed were nesting and possibly raising young but suddenly disappeared, though I still hear them. Probably their nest was raided by a monitor lizard.

Yes...they are native. The have a wide range in South Asia. Here is a range map...

post-216783-0-93165500-1457698779_thumb.

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I used to specialise in photos of 'Hardbills' in the UK.

From what I can see a lot of these birds are probably 'Softbills'.

My favourite species for photos in the UK were Bullfinches, Goldfinches, Siskins etc. These are all Hard bills (seed eaters) whereas the likes of Robins, Thrushes etc., are Soft Bills (Berry eaters)

Are there any birds here that are similar to our UK Hard bills ?

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I used to specialise in photos of 'Hardbills' in the UK.

From what I can see a lot of these birds are probably 'Softbills'.

My favourite species for photos in the UK were Bullfinches, Goldfinches, Siskins etc. These are all Hard bills (seed eaters) whereas the likes of Robins, Thrushes etc., are Soft Bills (Berry eaters)

Are there any birds here that are similar to our UK Hard bills ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds_of_Thailand

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When I saw the Barn Owl in 2008 near my house people set out immediately netting to trap it! I destroyed the netting but at the end the owl disappeared.

http://www.antoniuniphotography.com/p152661571/h461e6280#h461e6280

I'm afraid they cached it at the end and the owl ended in the infamous Chatuchak Market in Bangkok! bah.gif

A few nights ago I saw by coincident two big grey birds flying low along the trees near my house. I hope they are back again and shall not be cached anymore! But money is money in Thailand and lots of people don't give a damn about animals! sad.png

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I've never kept a garden list. I live in Buriram on the edge of extensive rice paddies on two sides of my garden, with a wooded temple compound on the third side, and village houses on the fourth. Every morning I take the dog(s) for a walk lasting about two hours, and in 8 years, I have recorded 170 species in this area.

I tried whittling that down to birds I had actually seen in or from the garden, and got a total of about 75 species.

Why not post the list, IB? May give those in Isaan some inspiration to document their own gardens, give them an idea of what they might look out for and put an end to the myth that there are no birds in Isaan because "they've all been eaten." My Surin Yard list is longer than my Chonburi one and was done in half the time. I will post it soon.

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Finally added #40 to my BKK yard list...Scaly-breasted Munia. The next 10 are certain to be more difficult than the first 40...

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When we built our house in the countryside near Chiang Rai there wasn’t much birdlife but things have changed over the years and I often marvel at the variety of birds now. I am not really into counting or naming but a quick look at the lists and I did not notice my favorite bird, the Pied Harrier. Their black and white coloring is so dramatic and their low-level aerobatics over the rice fields are mesmerizing. The Open-billed Storks are new this year and our largest bird by far. They all seem to have plenty to eat so we don’t feed any of the birds.

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