Jump to content
BANGKOK

Recommended Posts

Does anyone know where my Black Drongos disappear too between end of March and September.

The birds that turn up in September are juveniles(speckled chest).

There are still a few "resident" birds here

but the majority have now departed.

Have you seen them[emoji57]

Location just North of Phetchabun.

I'm no expert on Black Drongos, but am familiar with breeding habits, territories and sighting frequencies of birds in the USA.

Assuming since the birds are year-round residents in your area that they are staking out breeding territories and spreading out. Fewer of them around and the females are not seen nearly as frequently as they are tending to nest/eggs/young while remaining inconspicuous.

Thanks that certainly sounds feasible.

I should add that in September the birds arrive in large groups and appear to hang around in the area. Beginning of April they have all gone save for an odd lone straggler.

I wondered if the birds do in fact migrate arriving here at the start of the cooler weather and leaving when it gets hot?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know where my Black Drongos disappear too between end of March and September.

The birds that turn up in September are juveniles(speckled chest).

There are still a few "resident" birds here

but the majority have now departed.

Have you seen them[emoji57]

Location just North of Phetchabun.

I'm no expert on Black Drongos, but am familiar with breeding habits, territories and sighting frequencies of birds in the USA.

Assuming since the birds are year-round residents in your area that they are staking out breeding territories and spreading out. Fewer of them around and the females are not seen nearly as frequently as they are tending to nest/eggs/young while remaining inconspicuous.

Thanks that certainly sounds feasible.

I should add that in September the birds arrive in large groups and appear to hang around in the area. Beginning of April they have all gone save for an odd lone straggler.

I wondered if the birds do in fact migrate arriving here at the start of the cooler weather and leaving when it gets hot?

Black Drongos are common permanent residents from the extreme northern peninsula upwards throughout the rest of the Kingdom.

Quoting directly on Drongo sp. from A Guide To The Birds Of Thailand...'found mostly in pairs when territorial, but sometimes in flocks in winter or when on migration.' And specifically on Black Drongo...'often roosts communally in large numbers.'

Range map of Black Drongo from the Philip Round book mentioned above. Pink shading indicates Resident, while blue is Winter Visitor.

post-216783-14600816826564_thumb.jpg

Edited by Skeptic7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I mentioned above about a fortnight ago, we never see black drongos here (samut prakarn close to the sea and plaa salid fields) but now we have a flock of about 8 birds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding Black Drongos:

As I have said in many threads before, "The Birds of the Bangkok Area" by Philip Round gives information that is not included in other books, especially as it relates to status, range (world-wide) and seasonality. If you can find it, get it.

While Black Drongo are resident and year-round in some areas of Thailand, they are far outnumbered by winter visitors. This is true in the north as well as the south. When I lived in Surin, I would only occasionally see one between April and September. By late September to early October they were everywhere. Mostly gone again by end of April, along with most of the other winter visitors. I now live in Chonburi and it's the same here.

So tefldon, you may occasionally see one between Late April and mid September (resident thai), but they (wintering cathoecus) will be back in numbers by late September. In the mean time, they will be north through China.

Does anyone know where my Black Drongos disappear too between end of March and September.
The birds that turn up in September are juveniles(speckled chest).

There are still a few "resident" birds here
but the majority have now departed.

Have you seen them[emoji57]

Location just North of Phetchabun.

I'm no expert on Black Drongos, but am familiar with breeding habits, territories and sighting frequencies of birds in the USA.

Assuming since the birds are year-round residents in your area that they are staking out breeding territories and spreading out. Fewer of them around and the females are not seen nearly as frequently as they are tending to nest/eggs/young while remaining inconspicuous.
Thanks that certainly sounds feasible.

I should add that in September the birds arrive in large groups and appear to hang around in the area. Beginning of April they have all gone save for an odd lone straggler.

I wondered if the birds do in fact migrate arriving here at the start of the cooler weather and leaving when it gets hot?
Black Drongos are common permanent residents from the extreme northern peninsula upwards throughout the rest of the Kingdom.

Quoting directly on Drongo sp. from A Guide To The Birds Of Thailand...'found mostly in pairs when territorial, but sometimes in flocks in winter or when on migration.' And specifically on Black Drongo...'often roosts communally in large numbers.'

Range map of Black Drongo from the Philip Round book mentioned above. Pink shading indicates Resident, while blue is Winter Visitor.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 12 years in samut prakarn I've never seen any Ashy Drongos here...+2hrs drive to bangsaen but bird flying time must be minimal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 12 years in samut prakarn I've never seen any Ashy Drongos here...+2hrs drive to bangsaen but bird flying time must be minimal.

Yep. It's weird. And you said you just now had some Black for the first time?

Do you get out to wooded areas near you at all? Even temple grounds with a lot of trees? It's possible they are there. They should be anyway.

I don't know if this is the case, but I assume that the ashy that come to my Soi every September/October to Mid-April are the same individuals year in and year out. No way to prove that unless i were to catch one and ring it which i don't have the ability to do. I wonder the same about the AB Flycatchers on my Soi each "winter." Are they the same individuals year in and year out. I don't have the answer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably it's bird breeding time?

A couple of doves recently built a nest in the ceiling of my patio, but eventually realised it was a bad idea. Since then I've seen a few other 'couples' checking out the nest, which makes me think it must be nesting time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^I was thinking the exact same thing: it must be breeding season. In past years around this time we've twice had tailor birds nesting right outside our livingroom window. Currently I'm seeing loads of one of my favourite birds, magpie robins flying around, chasing, making me guess they're courting or competing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main bird breeding season is January to April, but some species, such as the three sparrows, and the common pigeons/doves, may be breeding at any time. Wetland birds breed in the wet season, so-called, and some other species have different breeding times.

Over the past few years, I have been able to watch four raptors breeding. The Black-shouldered Kites seem to be the earliest, starting about October. Brahminy Kites a month or two later (I saw large young on a nest a few days ago). The Shikras should also have large young by now. Rufous-winged Buzzards are a little later, and seem to have small young in late March or early April. I suppose the food availability is the main determinant. The Buzzards like snakes, and the current hot season is ideal for them!

Birds which are winter visitors here, as Black Drongos are in my part of Buriram, migrate north before breeding, and breed in the northern summer, the date depending on how far north they go.

Edited by isanbirder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 12 years in samut prakarn I've never seen any Ashy Drongos here...+2hrs drive to bangsaen but bird flying time must be minimal.

Yep. It's weird. And you said you just now had some Black for the first time?

Do you get out to wooded areas near you at all? Even temple grounds with a lot of trees? It's possible they are there. They should be anyway.

I don't know if this is the case, but I assume that the ashy that come to my Soi every September/October to Mid-April are the same individuals year in and year out. No way to prove that unless i were to catch one and ring it which i don't have the ability to do. I wonder the same about the AB Flycatchers on my Soi each "winter." Are they the same individuals year in and year out. I don't have the answer.

I can confirm that the same Chinese Pond Herons come back to my garden each year. I can tell because one individual has a damaged left leg and limps.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Third day of not seeing or hearing Ashy Drongo or Black so unless I see one today or tomorrow, 10 April is this year's departure date. AB Flycatcher still around this morning, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still have plenty of Black Drongos around, but haven't seen an Ashy this spring.

Another 'winter visitor' which I'm seeing these days is the Little Heron..... one yesterday, and two today, all in different locations. Quite late by my experience.

Also today, a pair of Brahminy Kites keeping the crows at bay while their single chick took its maiden flight.... quite a display.

Meanwhile, the Rufous-winged Buzzards have two large, white, fluffy chicks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...