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Managed to get a BIF of a White-throated Kingfisher-hope you like it        

Talking of colourful but common birds, I managed to get this photo about right of a White-throated Kingfisher. Rarely seen near water, happy hunting in fields etc.

Obviously not in my garden, but in Kaeng Krachana NP last week. Also saw a lot of Grey Wagtails which are among the earliest of the winter visitors reminding me that it's time to keep my eyes open in

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On 7/22/2018 at 2:07 PM, Skeptic7 said:

Up close look at 3 Baya Weaver nests. The workmanship is superb. Notice how spectacularly woven the nest...and in the last pic how well and tightly wrapped around the branch the grasses & fronds are for supporting the dangling chamber. Obviously 2 of these are unfinished nests. Speculations on the purpose of these unfinished structures abound and they are always found in nesting colonies. Whether just deserted, or rejected nests by females or sheltered roosts called "canopies", the males have definitely been seen alighting inside on the sheltered perch while the female is incubating.

 

Whether the canopy is deliberately planned as a shelter for one or both birds, or whether it is only a partially built and deserted nest, there can be no doubt that the nonincubatlng male has been seen occupying the structure and using it as a perching convenience; and there is no doubt that, whatever the original purpose of these structures, the canopy does make an admirable refuge from wind, rain and hot sun. (C.A. Wood The Nest of the Baya Weaver Bird, 1926)

 

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got loads of these out behind our shop house in undeveloped land...rice paddy level and the bank of the local klong has been breached and the klong water comes in...tons of birds (but you can't see them roosting) and their monitor lizard predators...

 

never seen any birds near the hanging nests, maybe inside? from the photos the weave of the nest is simply amazing, an intricacy like a spider's web...our feathered friends have a lot more than we give them credit for...

 

there is a house sparrow nest under the front eaves of our house and it's very sloppy by comparison, and here comes tutsi just outta bed in the mornin' and grumpy and talkin' to the birds: 'hey! clean up that mess, goddamit...look to see that nice stuff that yer friends got on the other side and you don't even got any murderous lizards to worry about like they do ye lazy bastids...'

 

and I am ignored just like always in Thailand...'what's that clazy falang talkin' about?...'

 

 

 

 

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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12 hours ago, tutsiwarrior said:

got loads of these out behind our shop house in undeveloped land...rice paddy level and the bank of the local klong has been breached and the klong water comes in...tons of birds (but you can't see them roosting) and their monitor lizard predators...

 

never seen any birds near the hanging nests, maybe inside? from the photos the weave of the nest is simply amazing, an intricacy like a spider's web...our feathered friends have a lot more than we give them credit for...

 

there is a house sparrow nest under the front eaves of our house and it's very sloppy by comparison, and here comes tutsi just outta bed in the mornin' and grumpy and talkin' to the birds: 'hey! clean up that mess, goddamit...look to see that nice stuff that yer friends got on the other side and you don't even got any murderous lizards to worry about like they do ye lazy bastids...'

 

and I am ignored just like always in Thailand...'what's that clazy falang talkin' about?...'

 

 

 

 

I often find these nest too... blow down in the wind in random places.  However, I have yet to seen the birds themselves building them or using them.

 

We have a pair of common mynah birds that have been trying to nest on a ledge under our patio roof for about 6 months.  They are so lazy at building the nest and every morning we have to sweep up piles of sticks and junk they have dropped.  The nest never gets past a few sticks stage, as they keep knocking it off!  I would have thought they gave up and found a new place.. but perhaps they are not serious about making it anyway.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, jak2002003 said:

I often find these nest too... blow down in the wind in random places.  However, I have yet to seen the birds themselves building them or using them.

 

We have a pair of common mynah birds that have been trying to nest on a ledge under our patio roof for about 6 months.  They are so lazy at building the nest and every morning we have to sweep up piles of sticks and junk they have dropped.  The nest never gets past a few sticks stage, as they keep knocking it off!  I would have thought they gave up and found a new place.. but perhaps they are not serious about making it anyway.

 

 

I say round up the lazy bastids and send them all to eastern Syria to live with the jihadis who'll probably eat them fer supper...make yer landscape great again...(hey, sounds like a good slogan fer a red baseball cap donations fer which shall be graciously accepted)

 

 

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So since the Munias did not repeat the double nesting in the cactus on our lanai this year, GF had the brilliant idea to place an unfinished Baya Weaver nest in the same cactus. After about 3 days of high scrutiny by a pair, it seems to have passed inspection. Yesterday they started bringing nest materials and continuing today. It will be interesting how they integrate their addition to the existing nest. Assuming they will close off one hole completely and well conceal the other. 

 

The foundation of their handiwork are the curved palm strips and grasses outside the nest hole. 

 

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4 hours ago, Bredbury Blue said:

 

I watched the same out my kitchen window to the rear of our house the other day as I was chopping onions...the victim was a hooded baby snake that reared and flared but no matter, the coucal had its number...there were some smaller birds wanting to get in on the action but the larger coucal chased them off...

 

Nature in its merciless and violent majesty does it again...

 

excellent videos...

 

 

Edited by tutsiwarrior
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Well, that's nature. I have caught and removed at least a half dozen reticulated pythons from my garden here in Chon (as well as a couple cobras and etc). One had recently eaten our cat so not at all small. Nest raids are common for pythons so it's natural enough for birds to get their hackles up when they see one and kill it if they can. 

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9 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

Well, that's nature. I have caught and removed at least a half dozen reticulated pythons from my garden here in Chon (as well as a couple cobras and etc). One had recently eaten our cat so not at all small. Nest raids are common for pythons so it's natural enough for birds to get their hackles up when they see one and kill it if they can. 

We had a huge python living in the area of our old house that used to come and eat our ducks.. one a week.  Apparently it had been around for years, and is still about.. always avoiding capture.  Not popular with the neighbours who keep chickens.  I found it one night sneaking up on the sleeping ducks.  I remembered all the TV programmes when people just jump on then and grab them behind the head.  Well, those programmes are FIXED for sure... as I found out... just touching it near its head with a palm leaf the snake did a back flip, big loop in the air, and disappeared silently into he lake, with no sound or waves! on the water.  It did this in less than a second.  If I had tried to grab it like on TV it would have bitten me easily as I would have missed the neck.

 

One year I found what I presume was one its babies in our outdoor bar.  I kept it as a pet.. and handled it a lot so it got tame and docile (I love snakes and reptiles). It was a good pet.  Sadly, after 5 years of living with us, it escaped and never returned.  I had to tell my gardener not to kill any snakes if he saw it.  He was so scared of snakes he missed a couple of weeks to come around once he knew it was out.  He could not even go near it when it used to like to ride about wrapped around my shoulders, despite me showing him how placid and tame it was.  

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