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White Vented Myna bird info....  surprising (at least to me).

 

I just found out  the White Vented Myna Bird (the kind with the spiky crest punk hairstyle) is not native to Thailand

 

Its an introduced species and now some see it as an invasive species competing with the common myna.

 

I had to check on the net to confirm this info, and also found it is classified as VUNERABLE to EXTINCTION!

 

This is almost unbelievable to me as there are literally thousands of them where I live... massive noisy flocks roosting in the bamboo, and they are more common here than the common myna bird.  Out in the rice fields there are everywhere, even riding on the backs of the cows and buffalos. They are also lots jumping about on the roads all the time looking for squashed animals to eat.

 

Says on the net that they are introduced and breeding in South East Thailand.  They need change that info, because they are sure breeding up here in the North too and have been doing so for the 15 plus years I have been here.

 

I always thought that this bird was native to Thailand, and still can hardly imagine they are facing extinction.  Seems there came from Java and there they are in decline due to destruction of the forests (which I find strange as they are more liking farmland here).  

 

Was all this common knowledge to birders here?

White Vented Myna.PNG

Edited by jak2002003

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Just had a few days up in Sai Yok and Sangkhlaburi. Stayed on a floating raft in Sai Yok and the highlight was having blue kingfishers on the opposite bank - must have been a hidden nest in the steep sandy bank as even with my binoculars i couldn't  spot where they disappeared to; they had a black head so i presume they were black-capped kingfishers.

 

There were also flocks of birds i didn't recognise all along the Kwae noi river bank I'll try to post a video later and I'm sure someone  will recognise their call. A common bird I'm just not knowledge of their name.

 

Edited by Bredbury Blue

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On 10/12/2018 at 12:31 AM, jak2002003 said:

Was all this common knowledge to birders here?

 

Interesting...yes. Common knowledge...no. Some knowledge...yes. 

 

Conflicting info...some.

 

Introduced and thriving Starlings are nothing new. They are known for success and mainly considered a pest. European Starlings are abundantly successful in the USA and considered a major pest. Same is the case for these in, at very least, Singapore...and am guessing is or will be considered such here, Taiwan and other places it continues to invade. Not the birds fault at all, but rather humans who introduce the alien species...which can be a just a nuisance, to destructive, and even harmful to native species and ecosystems. In The States the European Starling (and House Sparrow...also introduced) are despised by everyone...even birders and bird lovers. 

 

While White-vented Myna (aka Javan Mynah) are threatened in their natural range of Java and Bali, it is because of the bird trade and pesticides. This species does not rely on forests. It is naturally found in cultivated and urban areas. The following is from The Red List of Threatened Species...

 

Habitat and Ecology:

Occurred throughout cultivated, grassy areas and scrub on Java and Bali and often occurred in urban areas, playing fields and airfields (Craig and Feare 2016). Introduced populations occur principally in urban areas, where they may be considered a pest (Yap and Sodhi 2004).

 

:thumbsup:

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On 10/4/2018 at 2:58 PM, steelepulse said:

I'm in Phuket and these birds have nice blue wings and a grayish body.  Unfortunately no photos have been taken.  Looking at google images it's probably the common kingfisher.  I just don't see them anywhere else on the island when traveling around.

Just for reference...since you thought maybe Common KF...and since I just photographed one the other day (sadly not in my yard). 

 

DSC05250_edited.jpg.5f0ab94a26c94c78b71b9f68ff3df7c7.jpg

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3 hours ago, Skeptic7 said:

 

Interesting...yes. Common knowledge...no. Some knowledge...yes. 

 

Conflicting info...some.

 

Introduced and thriving Starlings are nothing new. They are known for success and mainly considered a pest. European Starlings are abundantly successful in the USA and considered a major pest. Same is the case for these in, at very least, Singapore...and am guessing is or will be considered such here, Taiwan and other places it continues to invade. Not the birds fault at all, but rather humans who introduce the alien species...which can be a just a nuisance, to destructive, and even harmful to native species and ecosystems. In The States the European Starling (and House Sparrow...also introduced) are despised by everyone...even birders and bird lovers. 

 

While White-vented Myna (aka Javan Mynah) are threatened in their natural range of Java and Bali, it is because of the bird trade and pesticides. This species does not rely on forests. It is naturally found in cultivated and urban areas. The following is from The Red List of Threatened Species...

 

Habitat and Ecology:

Occurred throughout cultivated, grassy areas and scrub on Java and Bali and often occurred in urban areas, playing fields and airfields (Craig and Feare 2016). Introduced populations occur principally in urban areas, where they may be considered a pest (Yap and Sodhi 2004).

 

:thumbsup:

Thanks for the info, very interesting.

 

Think they are better off over here then than on Java.  It might actually save them from going extinct... kind of like avian refugees.  Good luck to them.. they are funny and cute, and I can't imagine they are doing much harm if any.  

 

I used to have pet one years ago (that I rescued as a chick with a broken leg from the road at night).   The info on the net says they can't learn human speech like the hill mynah birds.  But mine could speak Thai, English and also imitate lots of sounds.  He used to swear a lot in Thai, which Thai guests would find funny (I never taught him those words lol).  

 

He lived in a big wooden bird cage in the garden and was free to fly in adn and out during the day. He got a wild mate in the end and they had a nest and reared 2 chicks in our outhouse building roof cavity.  He would sit on the telephone wires talking English and Thai to his confused partner.  After they raised the chicks all 4 of them flew off to join the big flocks and did not return.  

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On 10/14/2018 at 10:30 AM, Bredbury Blue said:

Just had a few days up in Sai Yok and Sangkhlaburi. Stayed on a floating raft in Sai Yok and the highlight was having blue kingfishers on the opposite bank - must have been a hidden nest in the steep sandy bank as even with my binoculars i couldn't  spot where they disappeared to; they had a black head so i presume they were black-capped kingfishers.

 

There were also flocks of birds i didn't recognise all along the Kwae noi river bank I'll try to post a video later and I'm sure someone  will recognise their call. A common bird I'm just not knowledge of their name.

 

 

Can someone identity for me please?

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2 hours ago, BLACKJACK2 said:

Sounds like a red wattled lapwing to me.

Agreed. And possibly also mixed with some Black-winged Stilt, which would be common as these two species are often found in close proximity. Apparently, US soldiers in the war with Vietnam used to call Red-Wattled Lapwing "communist birds" because when trying to walk quietly through paddy land unobserved, the RW Lapwing would take to the air with their alarm-call and announce their presence. 

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5 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

Agreed. And possibly also mixed with some Black-winged Stilt, which would be common as these two species are often found in close proximity. Apparently, US soldiers in the war with Vietnam used to call Red-Wattled Lapwing "communist birds" because when trying to walk quietly through paddy land unobserved, the RW Lapwing would take to the air with their alarm-call and announce their presence. 

Thanks guys. Took a look at the two birds mentioned and they were all Red-Wattled Lapwings, loads of them. Noisy active birds but a nice call.

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The call is definitely red-wattled lapwing.

 

I live in quite a densely populated area and they fly over (particularly in the hours of darkness surprisingly) giving their repetitive and easily-learnt call.

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@Skeptic7Congrats on the big day. I wish I had known because I would have participated. Let me know when the May big day rolls around, but the October big day will almost always be better here. 

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