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So after infinitely more Pipit research than ever thought I'd possibly find interest...am still pretty much where I started! :vampire: Actually, just kidding...sort of. I now know a lot MORE than I ever imagined would about Richard's Pipit and Paddyfield Pipit, but still not certain about separating the 2 in areas where they overlap...which is the case in Kanchanaburi in winter. Separating visually may not be possible. The main reason is that Paddyfield Pipit and Richard's were originally lumped together with and considered subspecies of the Australasian Pipit. They were split along the way into separate species. Supposedly, Richard's is slightly larger and has minor plumage differences from Paddyfield, in the proverbial nutshell. However, Birds of Singapore and some other reference sites claim that the 2 can only be confidently distinguished by call notes. 

 

For those still awake, here's a few snaps from the patch of what appears to be a larger pipit with long bill and tail on the ground...and a smaller pipit with shorter bill and tail on the wire. Of course, posture and lighting surely come into play.  

 

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Managed to get a BIF of a White-throated Kingfisher-hope you like it        

Talking of colourful but common birds, I managed to get this photo about right of a White-throated Kingfisher. Rarely seen near water, happy hunting in fields etc.

Obviously not in my garden, but in Kaeng Krachana NP last week. Also saw a lot of Grey Wagtails which are among the earliest of the winter visitors reminding me that it's time to keep my eyes open in

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Looking again (and again) at the Pipit pix I posted above, seems the 3rd pic is of a different bird than the top 2. Noticed that the bird in the top 2 pix has dark lores, while the bird in the 3rd has light colored lores. There actually were 2 pipits in the yard at that time. 

 

2 sources makes mention of the lores saying that Paddyfield generally has darker lores, while Richard's usually or always light...but it is not diagnostic. P. Round in "Birds of the Bangkok Area" gives the best comparison. Also this article for anyone interested. 

 

https://digdeep1962.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/identification-of-paddyfield-richards-and-blyths-pipits-in-malaysia/

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On 1/31/2019 at 9:09 PM, Skeptic7 said:

Looking again (and again) at the Pipit pix I posted above, seems the 3rd pic is of a different bird than the top 2. Noticed that the bird in the top 2 pix has dark lores, while the bird in the 3rd has light colored lores. There actually were 2 pipits in the yard at that time. 

 

2 sources makes mention of the lores saying that Paddyfield generally has darker lores, while Richard's usually or always light...but it is not diagnostic. P. Round in "Birds of the Bangkok Area" gives the best comparison. Also this article for anyone interested. 

 

https://digdeep1962.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/identification-of-paddyfield-richards-and-blyths-pipits-in-malaysia/

Pretty certain that third bird is one of the Bushlarks. I used to be good at separating Richard's from Paddyfield, or I thought I was anyway, as I often had them right next to each other and there were things I knew - but can't recall offhand - about size and stance and such like. That was when i was in Surin and saw them all the time. Here in Chonburi I only see them when i go out to certain areas and don't pay all that much attention. Likewise, I was good at the Bushlarks (and the Skylark) but mostly on behavior and call. You won't often see Paddyfield or Richard's on wires, though, or really anywhere but on the ground. 

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On 1/20/2019 at 1:40 PM, tutsiwarrior said:

saw a bright yellow little guy out on the front terrace this morning that I hadn't seen before...is there more migration in these parts (central Thailand) during the cold weather than other times of the year?

 

 

In a very general sense, winter visitors mostly arrive around September and depart around April. Of course many species fall outside that range. Little, yellow and eating bananas on the ground could be Oriental White-eye, depending where you live. Other small yellow birds would include some of the sunbirds - which can appear yellow - or the Common Iora, but these would likely be in trees and not on the ground. Google those possibilities and you may find your bird. Those are all residents, not winter visitors. See if you can get a photo. Even a fuzzy jpeg from a phone s often enough for a positive ID.

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3 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

Pretty certain that third bird is one of the Bushlarks. I used to be good at separating Richard's from Paddyfield, or I thought I was anyway, as I often had them right next to each other and there were things I knew - but can't recall offhand - about size and stance and such like. That was when i was in Surin and saw them all the time. Here in Chonburi I only see them when i go out to certain areas and don't pay all that much attention. Likewise, I was good at the Bushlarks (and the Skylark) but mostly on behavior and call. You won't often see Paddyfield or Richard's on wires, though, or really anywhere but on the ground. 

Sold! Great call on the Bushlark. Patch list up to 46...thanks! Thought it rather odd a Pipit on a wire, but outside of BKK and still far removed from my comfort zone.

Now which one? Pretty sure it's a Singing Bushlark (Australasian), as wings and tail don't appear rufous enough...AND does appear that outer tail feathers show some white, which both Round and Robson say is diagnostic. 

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4 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

This sux! Leaving the Kingdom on the 15th for a few weeks. Would have been camped out on my BKK lanai all weekend. 😠

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18 minutes ago, Skeptic7 said:

This sux! Leaving the Kingdom on the 15th for a few weeks. Would have been camped out on my BKK lanai all weekend. 😠

I will be working on and off so can't do the whole weekend, but will do as much as I can. Why not do it from wherever you are going? They also encourage folks to have a look around beyond their yards, though I do like the excuse to sit around and give my yard area a real good look. 

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25 minutes ago, Skeptic7 said:

Sold! Great call on the Bushlark. Patch list up to 46...thanks! Thought it rather odd a Pipit on a wire, but outside of BKK and still far removed from my comfort zone.

Now which one? Pretty sure it's a Singing Bushlark (Australasian), as wings and tail don't appear rufous enough...AND does appear that outer tail feathers show some white, which both Round and Robson say is diagnostic. 

I also had it as probable Australasian. A bit hard to tell from the pics, but I would tick it as that. Likely you'll get both there eventually anyway. 

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1 hour ago, AjarnNorth said:

I also had it as probable Australasian. A bit hard to tell from the pics, but I would tick it as that. Likely you'll get both there eventually anyway. 

Now about the other sp...Rufous-winged. The 2 field guides differ on not only common name, which is not uncommon, but the scientific name, as well...which means SPLITS and subspecies, of which there are many. TMI, but seems there is no longer a Rufous-winged (only Australasian and sub sp) and Singing and it's 4 sub sp does not include Indochinese, which is a single sp. TMI...I know. 

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2 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

I will be working on and off so can't do the whole weekend, but will do as much as I can. Why not do it from wherever you are going? They also encourage folks to have a look around beyond their yards, though I do like the excuse to sit around and give my yard area a real good look. 

Gonna be in Detroit in dead of Winter! :bah: Already know what will be around...Rock Dove, House Sparrow, European Starling and Mourning Dove. Northern Cardinal and American Robin are probable. If really lucky...American Tree Sparrow, Downy Woodpecker. Also possible Hairy Woodpecker and Northern Flicker. Slim pickins there any time of year, but ultra-slim in Feb. 

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8 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

 

In a very general sense, winter visitors mostly arrive around September and depart around April. Of course many species fall outside that range. Little, yellow and eating bananas on the ground could be Oriental White-eye, depending where you live. Other small yellow birds would include some of the sunbirds - which can appear yellow - or the Common Iora, but these would likely be in trees and not on the ground. Google those possibilities and you may find your bird. Those are all residents, not winter visitors. See if you can get a photo. Even a fuzzy jpeg from a phone s often enough for a positive ID.

 

I only get to see them in a flash while they're perched then they flit off, maybe sometimes to return...so no good opportunities for photography...when I hear a birdcall that I don't recognize I'll try to move slowly and approach...

 

many thanks to the birders with cameras that have posted on this thread as I've become aware of a lot of species that hang around close by that I wouldn't have been aware of before...we got a huge undeveloped area behind our house with tons of birds of all kinds...

 

 

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1 hour ago, Skeptic7 said:

Now about the other sp...Rufous-winged. The 2 field guides differ on not only common name, which is not uncommon, but the scientific name, as well...which means SPLITS and subspecies, of which there are many. TMI, but seems there is no longer a Rufous-winged (only Australasian and sub sp) and Singing and it's 4 sub sp does not include Indochinese, which is a single sp. TMI...I know. 

Yep. When I opened my Lekagul-Round just now, under Singing I have a small post-it that says "Australasian / Mirafra javanica" and just above Rufous-winged a post-it that says "Indochinese / Mirafra erythrocephala." The post-it notes go back at least 10 years so I can't remember where that information came from, but it's probable it came directly from Philip Round as I had really no other source of info at the time. Unless that came from the old edition of the Robson (I can check that later). But those names match the current Thai checklist. They also match the info in Birds of Bangkok Area I am sure you already know. So still another Bushlark for you to tick in Kan. Also checked my Surin notes and had both fairly regularly and would have taken all precautions to have properly ID'd each. 

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Today's top morning yard visitor. Brown-throated Sunbird. Used to see them regularly in Surin, but only a few sightings here and there here in Chonburi. I was actually trying to get decent photos of what was likely an Inornate warbler, when this BT sunbird just popped into view and scared the warbler off. 

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