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On 10/22/2019 at 6:20 PM, Speedo1968 said:

 

Many thanks Skeptic7  for your prompt response.

As I mentioned I am not a bird watcher per se but look at nature in general as well as the weather.

I do not have field glasses so rely on my eyesight and other senses.

I have lived worked in farming in many countries since the 1970’s and am particularly interested in man’s effect on nature.

Here in Thailand for 20 years for the past 4 years I have lived about 50km south of Khon Kaen.     Outside a small market town with fields and ponds around, the area was, at the end of August, very badly flooded.     I walk in a small local keep fit park and across the fields two or three times a day, 4am, again in the afternoon and then in the early evening.

 

The questions I have may seem a bit strange but then I always like to look ‘outside the box’ for an answer.

1)   Do crows always fly east ( towards where the sun will rise ) in the evening and west in the morning ?

I have observed this every day, in the afternoon the birds start heading towards their roost for the night.    They converge around the park then fly further on to their roost.      They come from basically 2 sometimes 3 sides just north and south of east.   Have counted over 100 birds in 15 minutes.   Seen some ‘midair fighting’ ?

When I first came here there were only 2 birds in a large tree in early morning and late afternoon.    Only since this year have I seen so many birds.

 

2)   Is it unusual to see sparrows ( in town think they are hedge sparrows ) with all white feathered heads and necks ?    They, two of them, are part of the same family group.

 

3)   I see some birds flying, about the size of a swift / swallow ? that have iridescent green feathered backs when the sun shines on it.   Any idea what they might be ?

 

4)   Saw a kingfisher for the first time this year sitting on a power / telephone cable.

 

5)   The first year I was here about 6 or 7 hoopoes, the next year none, last year 2 and this year 3 or 4.      Have only seen one since the flooding.   Sorry can’t tell sex of bird.

 

6)   The first year I was here I saw a yellow feather headed / necked myna, the second year two.    The third year two others in different places within 500 metres of the original bird.    This year after the flooding, none.

 

7)   The second year I was here someone night trap netted about 15 birds, 3 beautiful owls ( one very old ), some hoopoes and other young birds.   The trappers took what they wanted and left the others to die.    The owls were already dead, the remaining birds I was unable to save because the net was so fine.   I reported it to the local council who were only able to shrug their shoulders.     The following year someone trap netted again not far away and some birds were left to die.   I pulled down the poles and had to do this a few times before they gave up.    Unfortunately song birds are still being trapped openly using a covered cage with a bird inside as a lure.

1. Not sure, but no I don't think so. Birds of all kinds tend to go where the food is and then roosters will return to their roost. I don't think East or West would factor in that equation.

 

2. No. Sparrows are common Sounds like you are describing House Sparrows, which are colonial and over the lst few decades have spread east from the borders of Burma and etc. to poulate the whole country. They are still outnumbered by tree spearrows in most populated areas, but they are taking over in some places. Plain-backed aparrows are also fairly common but tend to areas outside of towns.

 

3. Likely Green Bee-eaters. 

 

4. There are various kinds of kingfishers here, some are resident and some are winter visitors. I would need to know more about what your looked like to identify it, but the most likely are common kingfisher (very smalll) and white-thrated (much larger). Likely winter visitor in Khon Khaen may be Black-capped.

 

5. Hoopoes are fairly common residents with - I think - some areas seeing an influx of winter visitors.

 

6. It depends what you mean by yellow-headed. Common Mynas and White-vented Mynas seem to molt (go bald) in the head and neck sometimes and are not an uncommon site. 

 

7. Mist netting is common throughout. It's an awful practice and a terrible way to collect "food." I would like to see a photo of the song bird traps and know what kind of birds they are using as "lures."

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Every year I see Paciffic Golden Plovers in my usual patch in Chonburi. As yet, none. This is perplexing. I was lucky yesterday to see an Indian Thick-knee (aka Stone-curlew) which I also see every year in the same area, often with PGPs, and sometimes in a pair which may be breeding in my patch. Not the best photos of I have of the bird, but now I know it's around I will likely get better pics soon. Also included from yesterday a Common Kingfisher (Juv), Painted Stork, and Little Heron. 

ITK1.jpg

CKF.jpg

PS1.jpg

LH.jpg

Edited by AjarnNorth
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On 10/22/2019 at 7:20 AM, Speedo1968 said:

 

Many thanks Skeptic7  for your prompt response.

As I mentioned I am not a bird watcher per se but look at nature in general as well as the weather.

I do not have field glasses so rely on my eyesight and other senses.

I have lived worked in farming in many countries since the 1970’s and am particularly interested in man’s effect on nature.

Here in Thailand for 20 years for the past 4 years I have lived about 50km south of Khon Kaen.     Outside a small market town with fields and ponds around, the area was, at the end of August, very badly flooded.     I walk in a small local keep fit park and across the fields two or three times a day, 4am, again in the afternoon and then in the early evening.

 

The questions I have may seem a bit strange but then I always like to look ‘outside the box’ for an answer.

1)   Do crows always fly east ( towards where the sun will rise ) in the evening and west in the morning ?

I have observed this every day, in the afternoon the birds start heading towards their roost for the night.    They converge around the park then fly further on to their roost.      They come from basically 2 sometimes 3 sides just north and south of east.   Have counted over 100 birds in 15 minutes.   Seen some ‘midair fighting’ ?

When I first came here there were only 2 birds in a large tree in early morning and late afternoon.    Only since this year have I seen so many birds.

 

2)   Is it unusual to see sparrows ( in town think they are hedge sparrows ) with all white feathered heads and necks ?    They, two of them, are part of the same family group.

 

3)   I see some birds flying, about the size of a swift / swallow ? that have iridescent green feathered backs when the sun shines on it.   Any idea what they might be ?

 

4)   Saw a kingfisher for the first time this year sitting on a power / telephone cable.

 

5)   The first year I was here about 6 or 7 hoopoes, the next year none, last year 2 and this year 3 or 4.      Have only seen one since the flooding.   Sorry can’t tell sex of bird.

 

6)   The first year I was here I saw a yellow feather headed / necked myna, the second year two.    The third year two others in different places within 500 metres of the original bird.    This year after the flooding, none.

 

7)   The second year I was here someone night trap netted about 15 birds, 3 beautiful owls ( one very old ), some hoopoes and other young birds.   The trappers took what they wanted and left the others to die.    The owls were already dead, the remaining birds I was unable to save because the net was so fine.   I reported it to the local council who were only able to shrug their shoulders.     The following year someone trap netted again not far away and some birds were left to die.   I pulled down the poles and had to do this a few times before they gave up.    Unfortunately song birds are still being trapped openly using a covered cage with a bird inside as a lure.

1. No

 

2. No. Not sure you are seeing actual sparrows. None of the sparrows in Thailand have all white heads. 

 

3. Agree with AN as prob Green Bee Eater, but more info would help. Are they graceful and acrobatic flyers like Swifts/Swallows/Bee-eaters? Or do they fly like sparrows? If the latter...could be Coppersmith Barbet or something else.

 

4. Agree w/AN

 

5. Difficult to sex Hoopoes. They are basically identical. 

 

6. Agree w/AN

 

7. Sadly common practice.  ☹️ It sucks. My neighbors in Bum<deleted>istan, Kanchanaburi trap quail and eat them. I've seen Barred Buttonquail a couple times along our soi.  

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A little known ID fact about Black Drongo, which will help ID a Black if unsure. They have a small white spot at the base of the bill or "gape", which is a telling field mark and can determine the ID...especially comes in handy when identifying bird photos at a later time. 3 different birds (3 different days anyway...could be same bird) last month in my yard in Kanchanaburi. A bit more difficult to see in the 3rd photo with the bird calling.

 

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IMG_1315.JPG.439bc093f42cf4181ce2d20a55564f09.JPG

 

 

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Thanks AjarnNorth, apologies for delay in replying.

Crows - guess the crow thing is a bit of 'twisted logic" on my part.

Today late departure crows, 5.45pm flew much lower over the park, in Winter they can be seen on their way to roost from about 3.30pm

The last few days I have been watching what I think are pigeons flying higher and in tighter formation than the crows.    Thought crows sometimes mobbed other birds.

 

Sparrows - they are in a narrow soi near to temple grounds.  They come down to eat opposite a local open fronted shop.    See them every day.   Yes, probably Tree Sparrows.   Many young ones that seem to have paler feathers.  There are 2 birds that have definite white feathers covering their head and neck, not moulted or mites.

In the garden areas where I live see both hedge and tree sparrows, the young seem to have lighter coloured feathers, others are dark brown backed.
Also I have a budgie ( parrot ? ) that joins in with others eating rice that I put down in front of my house.   When it first started visiting it seemed to have bonded with a particular sparrow, always together, then the sparrow must have disappeared and the budgie came alone.

 

Hoopoe - yes always saw them here in Winter season, only seen one here this year, perhaps it is confused by the climate being hot.    I worked in farming in Saudi, used to see them there.

 

Yellow head / neck Myna - I do not think these were in moult / mites etc.  From my work in farming since the 1960's I think that the yellow colouring was a genetic fault.  The first year I saw them there was only which was skittish and flew off, the second year two birds but again skittish, the third year two birds about 10 metres away in a buffalo field, the fourth year saw more coloured birds in two different areas about 300 – 500 metres from the original siting.   This year the original bird disappeared after the flooding.

 

Haven’t heard any woodpeckers this year, guess there are too many trees being cut down – often for no reason.     Could also be a reason for less hoopoes.

 

Kingfisher, I saw only twice when passing by on a bike ( me not the kingfisher on a bike ).   It didn’t fly off as I passed by.  Not seen again since that time.    Size larger than the swallows that I am seeing this time of year.

 

Mist – netting, haven’t seen for the past two years since I kept pulling down the bamboo poles and net.    I hadn’t thought about them eating particular birds caught in the net, but in hindsight the birds were so entangled it would have been impossible to get them out to be any use for singing.   I can only imagine how they got them out ..  Since that time I have heard no more owls on my early morning walks, before they used to fly overhead and call.

As for taking photos of the cages people have been using obviously for song birds; the people stay within sight of the cages which are placed about 4 – 5pm, and never leave them overnight.   I don’t think I would be very popular if I asked / or didn’t ask for a photo.

 

The flooding came at a time when various types of grasses were starting to grow.  In an area near two rain filled ponds following the flooding there is now a very dominant type of grass which has less seeds, the leaves are like razor grass and seeds very thin and stick in clothing.  I would think the seeds to be of less value to the birds.

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Does anyone know what this bird is? It appeared in our garden a few weeks ago, and spends its time 50:50 in our garden and our neighbours? I have looked in "Birds of Thailand" and cannot see anything similar. It is fairly tame - you can go within half a metre of it. It seems to eat insects in the grass, an occasional bite of banana, and cooked rice. It was quite noisy at first but has calmed down now. I am worried that our cats get it - there have been near misses already. 

 

I am wondering if it is an escaped caged bird, not indigenous to Thailand. 

 

image.png.0772018089c225e7a603baf9c46f5617.png

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Further to this: we live about 15 km from Khao Yai National Park, and I see that there are White Crested Laughing Thrushes in the park (according to their website). So if we can catch it we could take it there; but a big "if" as it is not that tame.  

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7 hours ago, John Begg said:

Further to this: we live about 15 km from Khao Yai National Park, and I see that there are White Crested Laughing Thrushes in the park (according to their website). So if we can catch it we could take it there; but a big "if" as it is not that tame.  

I understand the desire to "help", but it doesn't seem in distress, starving, injured or in danger. You said it's eating. I'd leave it be. This species is not endangered or threatened and is listed as "least concern". 

 

IMO capturing (or trying to capture) the bird will surely be more stressful for both the bird...AND you! 😁 

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Been sitting on this bird and these pix since the end of July. Forgot about them for a bit and then finally got back to them. The bird was quite high up the hillside behind our house. Figured it for Bronzed Drongo and got some confirmation recently from a couple different sources. Wanted to be sure as not only is this #68 for the Kanchanaburi patch...but #700 on my World List! 

 

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DSC06694_edited.jpg.fb70cea65ce81e873776400a4dd06404.jpg

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Finally added Rufous Treepie to my list(s). Also, Himalayan Swiftlet and Black-winged Stilt to bring Kanchanaburi patch list to 71.

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I have had two additions to my Bangsaen yard list (both by call) which I think brings it to 91 (have to check). Indian Nightjar and Large-tailed Nightjar. Both within a week or so of one another, the large tailed still heard regularly. I haven't seen them yet because they are hard to spot and quiet during the day and only call at night, though I have seen both just a kilometer or so away. Their recent arrival on my soi is due to forested land being razed and cleared for future building, which is the habitat they tend to. Likely my yard list here won't go much higher as it looks as if i will be relocating to Chiang Mai in 2020 and starting a new yard list from scratch. 

Edited by AjarnNorth
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13 hours ago, AjarnNorth said:

relocating to Chiang Mai in 2020 and starting a new yard list

Always fun starting a new list. Every bird is like seeing it all over again...for the very first time! Haha

 

Chiang Mai...alot of good birds up there. 

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