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Another shot of the Racket Tailed Treepie who is hanging out in the garden a fair bit just lately.

Nice pictures of the Racket-tailed treepie. Apart from one at Huai Saneng with AjarnNorth some years ago, I've only ever seen a pair in the trees bordering my garden a few months ago. During the past month, I've had three brief sightings in the same trees...... no binoculars with me, and so brief that I'm not sure of any of them. Unlike drongos, which aren't here at the moment anyway, these birds dive into the foliage, and are difficult to find again.

On July 8th, about midway between the last spring sighting and the first autumn sighting, I had a pond-heron fly over. Chinese or Javan? I shall never know.

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Managed to get a BIF of a White-throated Kingfisher-hope you like it        

Talking of colourful but common birds, I managed to get this photo about right of a White-throated Kingfisher. Rarely seen near water, happy hunting in fields etc.

Obviously not in my garden, but in Kaeng Krachana NP last week. Also saw a lot of Grey Wagtails which are among the earliest of the winter visitors reminding me that it's time to keep my eyes open in

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Another shot of the Racket Tailed Treepie who is hanging out in the garden a fair bit just lately.

Nice pictures of the Racket-tailed treepie. Apart from one at Huai Saneng with AjarnNorth some years ago, I've only ever seen a pair in the trees bordering my garden a few months ago. During the past month, I've had three brief sightings in the same trees...... no binoculars with me, and so brief that I'm not sure of any of them. Unlike drongos, which aren't here at the moment anyway, these birds dive into the foliage, and are difficult to find again.

On July 8th, about midway between the last spring sighting and the first autumn sighting, I had a pond-heron fly over. Chinese or Javan? I shall never know.

I know birds are fairly common but they are quite a challenge to photograph, as you say they soon head into the foliage. This bird seems a bit tolerant of me now. He's even perched on the terrace guard rail while I was sitting there. As soon as I moved he was off though!

Talking of flyovers I reckon I had a brace of Lesser Whistling Ducks last evening. Do they make a noise like whistling when flying?

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You can keep those, Skeptic; they're the bane of my life. The only good thing about them is that they provide host nests for the koels to parasitise. I think the Indian Rollers use their nests too.

Lesser Whistling Ducks...... the books say the whistle is their call, and also the sound of their wings. Well, this morning, one flew so close to me that I had to duck.... and it whirred, it didn't whistle.

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I saw a couple of colourful birds yesterday - similar to the Hoopoe, but without the head crest - and they had long wading-bird type legs.

Any ideas?

Not enough info, dick. Where did you see the bird? Province? You say similar to Hoopoe? How? In coloration? Size? Shape of bill? All of the above?

Long wading-bird type legs? Was the bird wading? If so, was it in coastal waters? Inland mangroves? Freshwater pond or reservoir? Near or far from the coast? Was it wading out in the open or skulking along the edge near bush?

Could be some kind of rail or crake or lapwing or pond-heron, but with the scant information pretty impossible to guess.

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I saw a couple of colourful birds yesterday - similar to the Hoopoe, but without the head crest - and they had long wading-bird type legs.

Any ideas?

Not enough info, dick. Where did you see the bird? Province? You say similar to Hoopoe? How? In coloration? Size? Shape of bill? All of the above?

Long wading-bird type legs? Was the bird wading? If so, was it in coastal waters? Inland mangroves? Freshwater pond or reservoir? Near or far from the coast? Was it wading out in the open or skulking along the edge near bush?

Could be some kind of rail or crake or lapwing or pond-heron, but with the scant information pretty impossible to guess.

The birds were pecking around in the soi leading to my house in Rawai, Phuket. Large green areas to either side, no houses. Edit - big hibiscus (and something else - sorry) hedges to either side of the soi.

I saw them when riding down the soi on my scooter, and at first thought they were Hoopoes due to the colour (and I frequently see Hoopoes along this soi). But then I saw they didn't have the head crest, and had long, wading-bird legs. Many wading birds hang out around my house and the soi.

I'm v close to the sea, which is why I see lots of kingfishers and wading birds.

Edited by dick dasterdly
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I saw a couple of colourful birds yesterday - similar to the Hoopoe, but without the head crest - and they had long wading-bird type legs.

Any ideas?

Not enough info, dick. Where did you see the bird? Province? You say similar to Hoopoe? How? In coloration? Size? Shape of bill? All of the above?

Long wading-bird type legs? Was the bird wading? If so, was it in coastal waters? Inland mangroves? Freshwater pond or reservoir? Near or far from the coast? Was it wading out in the open or skulking along the edge near bush?

Could be some kind of rail or crake or lapwing or pond-heron, but with the scant information pretty impossible to guess.

The birds were pecking around in the soi leading to my house in Rawai, Phuket. Large green areas to either side, no houses. Edit - big hibiscus (and something else - sorry) hedges to either side of the soi.

I saw them when riding down the soi on my scooter, and at first thought they were Hoopoes due to the colour (and I frequently see Hoopoes along this soi). But then I saw they didn't have the head crest, and had long, wading-bird legs. Many wading birds hang out around my house and the soi.

I'm v close to the sea, which is why I see lots of kingfishers and wading birds.

Anything like this? Which I believe is a Wood Sandpiper

Or this

Which may well be a Common Sandpiper

I'm not 100% sure on ID but I thought it might help with your description-both birds are waders. First one near sea in Prachuap the second at a big dam in Phetchabun.

post-59731-0-12266700-1468578988_thumb.j

post-59731-0-08151100-1468579124_thumb.j

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Bird ID suggestions please.

Only saw briefly. Quick look and 1 photo....sorry!

Chestnut back, black slightly curved beak and yellow legs. Bigger than Prinia similar size to Fantail. May have white supercillium.

I reckon its a new patch dweller whatever!

Thanks for looking

post-59731-0-36548100-1468653590_thumb.j

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Love those myna birds. Currently got a pair trying to build a nest in my xpelair outlet.

Well those mynas built the nest in the xpelair outlet. The outlet flap has 3 plastic pieces, the bottom had been broken off, so they got in. We rarely use the xpelair extractor, the outlet is not easily accessible so good place for a nest. They definitely had chick (s) as during daylight hours they were so noisy. Parents constantly coming and going. Put out more myna food than I usually do. Then last week silence and no activity. Wife reckons a tuukae had the chicks, I prefer to think they flew away.

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Love those myna birds. Currently got a pair trying to build a nest in my xpelair outlet.

Well those mynas built the nest in the xpelair outlet. The outlet flap has 3 plastic pieces, the bottom had been broken off, so they got in. We rarely use the xpelair extractor, the outlet is not easily accessible so good place for a nest. They definitely had chick (s) as during daylight hours they were so noisy. Parents constantly coming and going. Put out more myna food than I usually do. Then last week silence and no activity. Wife reckons a tuukae had the chicks, I prefer to think they flew away.

Snakes and Monitors are the usual culprits. Had my garden Myna nest raided last week by a young monitor.

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Bird ID suggestions please.

Only saw briefly. Quick look and 1 photo....sorry!

Chestnut back, black slightly curved beak and yellow legs. Bigger than Prinia similar size to Fantail. May have white supercillium.

I reckon its a new patch dweller whatever!

Thanks for looking

Yellow-eyed Babbler is my guess. Never seen one... but pretty sure...

Agreed. I used to see them in scrub at the back of my house in Chiangmai.

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Bird ID suggestions please.

Only saw briefly. Quick look and 1 photo....sorry!

Chestnut back, black slightly curved beak and yellow legs. Bigger than Prinia similar size to Fantail. May have white supercillium.

I reckon its a new patch dweller whatever!

Thanks for looking

Yellow-eyed Babbler is my guess. Never seen one... but pretty sure...

Many thanks AjarnNorth and Issanbirder. Spot on as usual.

Had a look on Oriental Bird Club site concur ID.

So a new one for the patch list number 53.

Edited by thetefldon
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Love those myna birds. Currently got a pair trying to build a nest in my xpelair outlet.

Well those mynas built the nest in the xpelair outlet. The outlet flap has 3 plastic pieces, the bottom had been broken off, so they got in. We rarely use the xpelair extractor, the outlet is not easily accessible so good place for a nest. They definitely had chick (s) as during daylight hours they were so noisy. Parents constantly coming and going. Put out more myna food than I usually do. Then last week silence and no activity. Wife reckons a tuukae had the chicks, I prefer to think they flew away.

Snakes and Monitors are the usual culprits. Had my garden Myna nest raided last week by a young monitor.

See monitors in my garden, snakes occasionally, but they wouldn't have been able to get to the nest. One of the reasons I actively court birds but the myna in particular is they are THE best alarm for predator in my garden which I appreciate.

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I saw a couple of colourful birds yesterday - similar to the Hoopoe, but without the head crest - and they had long wading-bird type legs.

Any ideas?

Not enough info, dick. Where did you see the bird? Province? You say similar to Hoopoe? How? In coloration? Size? Shape of bill? All of the above?

Long wading-bird type legs? Was the bird wading? If so, was it in coastal waters? Inland mangroves? Freshwater pond or reservoir? Near or far from the coast? Was it wading out in the open or skulking along the edge near bush?

Could be some kind of rail or crake or lapwing or pond-heron, but with the scant information pretty impossible to guess.

The birds were pecking around in the soi leading to my house in Rawai, Phuket. Large green areas to either side, no houses. Edit - big hibiscus (and something else - sorry) hedges to either side of the soi.

I saw them when riding down the soi on my scooter, and at first thought they were Hoopoes due to the colour (and I frequently see Hoopoes along this soi). But then I saw they didn't have the head crest, and had long, wading-bird legs. Many wading birds hang out around my house and the soi.

I'm v close to the sea, which is why I see lots of kingfishers and wading birds.

Anything like this? Which I believe is a Wood Sandpiper

Or this

Which may well be a Common Sandpiper

I'm not 100% sure on ID but I thought it might help with your description-both birds are waders. First one near sea in Prachuap the second at a big dam in Phetchabun.

Same legs, but a more colourful body or head - which is why I first thought they were Hoopoes.

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Love those myna birds. Currently got a pair trying to build a nest in my xpelair outlet.

Well those mynas built the nest in the xpelair outlet. The outlet flap has 3 plastic pieces, the bottom had been broken off, so they got in. We rarely use the xpelair extractor, the outlet is not easily accessible so good place for a nest. They definitely had chick (s) as during daylight hours they were so noisy. Parents constantly coming and going. Put out more myna food than I usually do. Then last week silence and no activity. Wife reckons a tuukae had the chicks, I prefer to think they flew away.

Snakes and Monitors are the usual culprits. Had my garden Myna nest raided last week by a young monitor.

My first thought was also snakes...

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Love those myna birds. Currently got a pair trying to build a nest in my xpelair outlet.

Well those mynas built the nest in the xpelair outlet. The outlet flap has 3 plastic pieces, the bottom had been broken off, so they got in. We rarely use the xpelair extractor, the outlet is not easily accessible so good place for a nest. They definitely had chick (s) as during daylight hours they were so noisy. Parents constantly coming and going. Put out more myna food than I usually do. Then last week silence and no activity. Wife reckons a tuukae had the chicks, I prefer to think they flew away.

Snakes and Monitors are the usual culprits. Had my garden Myna nest raided last week by a young monitor.

See monitors in my garden, snakes occasionally, but they wouldn't have been able to get to the nest. One of the reasons I actively court birds but the myna in particular is they are THE best alarm for predator in my garden which I appreciate.

I envy you seeing monitors as I've only seen them either dead (huge monitor, outside my gates....), or caught by workers tending the green areas either side of the soi leading to my house sad.png.

I've seen LOTS of snakes though, and the tree snakes can get pretty much anywhere.

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Dog Days of Summer and as usual the yard is at it's quietest this time of year. Even the most common cast of characters seem to be in short supply. HOWEVER...a couple months ago I mentioned sighting an Eclipse plumaged male Olive-backed Sunbird. Have been seeing him periodically since and trying with zero success and much frustration to get a pic. FINALLY managed a couple a few days ago. Highly cropped and crappy quality but totally ID-able...

post-216783-14694229945544_thumb.jpg

post-216783-14694230139556_thumb.jpg

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An Olive-backed Sunbird male came into my bedroom once. I have French windows which are open most of the day. When he wanted to go back out, he seemed to think the only way was through the ceiling.... and banged himself against it time and again. I had to frighten him out.

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Dog Days of Summer and as usual the yard is at it's quietest this time of year. Even the most common cast of characters seem to be in short supply. HOWEVER...a couple months ago I mentioned sighting an Eclipse plumaged male Olive-backed Sunbird. Have been seeing him periodically since and trying with zero success and much frustration to get a pic. FINALLY managed a couple a few days ago. Highly cropped and crappy quality but totally ID-able...

Same here in Phetchabun in the wet- not much action! I have spotted a few juvenile Olive Backed Sunbirds recently(female I think) but I didn't realise young male were called "eclipse" although I can see why.

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Dog Days of Summer and as usual the yard is at it's quietest this time of year. Even the most common cast of characters seem to be in short supply. HOWEVER...a couple months ago I mentioned sighting an Eclipse plumaged male Olive-backed Sunbird. Have been seeing him periodically since and trying with zero success and much frustration to get a pic. FINALLY managed a couple a few days ago. Highly cropped and crappy quality but totally ID-able...

Same here in Phetchabun in the wet- not much action! I have spotted a few juvenile Olive Backed Sunbirds recently(female I think) but I didn't realise young male were called "eclipse" although I can see why.

Interesting about the "eclipse" plumage is that it is not clear as to what it really is. Round in The Birds of the Bangkok Area says as much, but seems to favor the immature plumage idea. Whereas online sources seem to favor it's a seasonal molt. From one source...

Take the Olive-backed Sunbird. The presence of male eclipse phases can be terribly confusing to newcomers but experienced birders generally take them for granted. Now how does the male eclipse comes about? Through moulting of course. After the breeding season the male moults its colourful plumage and take on a less attractive eclipse dress. Once the next breeding season comes, he will again take on his colourful plumage.

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There's a wood near my place which I call Sunbird Wood. No Olive-backed..... they seem to prefer more open areas (I've had one breeding in my garden).

The first two years I was here, I found at least 30 Purple Sunbird nests in this wood. There were also a few Ruby-cheeked (birds; no nests found). The owner trimmed off most of the mid-level foliage, and the numbers dropped sharply. There are still some Purples there, but the Ruby-cheeked have gone, to be replaced by Brown-throated, which have now also gone.

What made me mention this is that Purple Sunbirds in eclipse can look like anything or nothing! The breeding period is roughly January to March, and the eclipse can be seen roughly during the next three months.

Edited by isanbirder
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BREAKING NEWS..... not exactly in my garden, but not far away. The first winter visitor of the year, a Little Heron. This was in a small pond beside a rural road, where I often see these in winter. In fact my last sighting this year was May 20, not so long ago!

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Finally reached the Half-Century mark for the yard. Little Heron flying through this morning makes #50. Also confirmed a Little Cormorant yesterday evening, so #49 goes from Cormorant sp. to Little Cormorant. 

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