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we get very brave collared dove types which aren't bothered by me

We get those little gray birds, not afraid they walk around on the ground and have accidently nearly stepped on one on several occasions w00t.gif

Zebra Dove most probably. Sometimes they're referred to as Peaceful Doves.

Cute birds but lousy nest builders

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Must be the local influence whistling.gif

Some of them seem to do a pretty good job building their nests, but not most of them.

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Black Drongos

The local wintering Black Drongos had left for the north a week or so ago, but I was still seeing one or two stragglers daily.

Yesterday morning we had 2-3 hours of rain, the first for God knows how long; it cleared up later, and in the evening there was a lot of activity in the tall trees in the temple compound opposite my house, and also in some more tall trees in a neighbour's garden at the back. This included about 15 Black Drongos hawking for insects.

Now this is where it gets interesting (to me)! The Drongos were a mixed bag of two subspecies, thai , with a deeply-forked tail, and the wintering cathoecus, which has a much shallower fork. Most of the birds I see here are 'shallow-fork', which prefer the open countryside. 'Deep fork', on the other hand, seem to prefer woodland; I get them in small parties from time to time, but they never hang about.

This morning there were still a few about, but only 'shallow-fork'.

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Some interesting comments on feeding birds. I, like AjarnNorth, just provide a mixed variety of trees and low shrubs. The fruit eaters and insect eaters seem to do just fine.

One thing I do provide is fresh water in the form of a bird bath. Nothing elaborate I'm currently using an old shallow dusbin lid mounted on a large plant pot!! I just keep the water clean and fresh to deter mozzies breeding. I position this in the shade and in a place that makes for some photo opportunities too, with man made perch handy as well!

The water is a great magnet for all birds in the hot dry times and very active in the early morning and late afternoon.

The photo is from my old house where the "bird bath" was a plant pot stand. The Green Billed Malkoha in the pic was having some issues getting his tail wet!!

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Thanks to this thread I can now recognise the birds that every now and again consider the pathetic 'nest' built by the doves - as Grey Breasted Prinia smile.png .

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Some interesting comments on feeding birds. I, like AjarnNorth, just provide a mixed variety of trees and low shrubs. The fruit eaters and insect eaters seem to do just fine.

One thing I do provide is fresh water in the form of a bird bath. Nothing elaborate I'm currently using an old shallow dusbin lid mounted on a large plant pot!! I just keep the water clean and fresh to deter mozzies breeding. I position this in the shade and in a place that makes for some photo opportunities too, with man made perch handy as well!

The water is a great magnet for all birds in the hot dry times and very active in the early morning and late afternoon.

The photo is from my old house where the "bird bath" was a plant pot stand. The Green Billed Malkoha in the pic was having some issues getting his tail wet!!

Living in a rented house - surrounded by trees and palms - its difficult to find places to plant more fruit bearing trees.

But to look on the bright side, fruit bats were nesting in a tree by the beach front restaurant a few years ago, so there must be a fair amount of fruit about. Presumably from the palms?

Bird baths are a must for anyone who cares about the wildlife. Squirrels love the bird bath almost as much as the birds, and its always entertaining to watch the birds have a bath or the squirrels flick about all over the place, making sure its safe smile.png .

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Some interesting comments on feeding birds. I, like AjarnNorth, just provide a mixed variety of trees and low shrubs. The fruit eaters and insect eaters seem to do just fine.

One thing I do provide is fresh water in the form of a bird bath. Nothing elaborate I'm currently using an old shallow dusbin lid mounted on a large plant pot!! I just keep the water clean and fresh to deter mozzies breeding. I position this in the shade and in a place that makes for some photo opportunities too, with man made perch handy as well!

The water is a great magnet for all birds in the hot dry times and very active in the early morning and late afternoon.

The photo is from my old house where the "bird bath" was a plant pot stand. The Green Billed Malkoha in the pic was having some issues getting his tail wet!!

Living in a rented house - surrounded by trees and palms - its difficult to find places to plant more fruit bearing trees.

But to look on the bright side, fruit bats were nesting in a tree by the beach front restaurant a few years ago, so there must be a fair amount of fruit about. Presumably from the palms?

Bird baths are a must for anyone who cares about the wildlife. Squirrels love the bird bath almost as much as the birds, and its always entertaining to watch the birds have a bath or the squirrels flick about all over the place, making sure its safe smile.png .

Most birds are not happy at all with squirrels. They eat their eggs and they kill their young. I try to chase off any squirrels from around my garden, not because I don't like them but because I like birds more thumbsup.gif

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Some interesting comments on feeding birds. I, like AjarnNorth, just provide a mixed variety of trees and low shrubs. The fruit eaters and insect eaters seem to do just fine.

One thing I do provide is fresh water in the form of a bird bath. Nothing elaborate I'm currently using an old shallow dusbin lid mounted on a large plant pot!! I just keep the water clean and fresh to deter mozzies breeding. I position this in the shade and in a place that makes for some photo opportunities too, with man made perch handy as well!

The water is a great magnet for all birds in the hot dry times and very active in the early morning and late afternoon.

The photo is from my old house where the "bird bath" was a plant pot stand. The Green Billed Malkoha in the pic was having some issues getting his tail wet!!

Living in a rented house - surrounded by trees and palms - its difficult to find places to plant more fruit bearing trees.

But to look on the bright side, fruit bats were nesting in a tree by the beach front restaurant a few years ago, so there must be a fair amount of fruit about. Presumably from the palms?

Bird baths are a must for anyone who cares about the wildlife. Squirrels love the bird bath almost as much as the birds, and its always entertaining to watch the birds have a bath or the squirrels flick about all over the place, making sure its safe smile.png .

Most birds are not happy at all with squirrels. They eat their eggs and they kill their young. I try to chase off any squirrels from around my garden, not because I don't like them but because I like birds more thumbsup.gif

I know you're right, but I still love all the wildlife - birds/butterflies/squirrels/snakes/frogs/toads etc.

Going off topic, but one off the funniest things I've seen is a toad sitting in the dogs' indoor water bowl!

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Looking at the yard lists on the thread, noticed no one else has Pink-necked Pigeon. They are abundant and presumed breeding in the patch behind my building in BKK. Beautiful birds for sure. Apologies for the crudity of these pix. They were taken at distance and enhanced to the max. Going to get a new super-zoom digital camera and will post (hopefully) better pix soon. For now these will have to do...

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Looking at the yard lists on the thread, noticed no one else has Pink-necked Pigeon. They are abundant and presumed breeding in the patch behind my building in BKK. Beautiful birds for sure. Apologies for the crudity of these pix. They were taken at distance and enhanced to the max. Going to get a new super-zoom digital camera and will post (hopefully) better pix soon. For now these will have to do...

I have never seen one! And a lot of my local Chonburi birding is done in coastal scrub and mangroves where they are meant to be fairly common. OK. Now i have a mission. Though i am not expecting to see one from my garden after over 4 years of not having seen one from here. i will have to gout looking.

For super-zooms, look at the Fuji HS series. Get manual focus over automatic...Fuuji or otherwise... much better for birds in flight. At rest just fully extend the lense and set it on auto and you'll be surprised. But that's coming from a birder, not a photographer. i get some great shot buts what's most important to me is just ID'able shots. I leave the National Geo quality pics to those with 5000 dollar kits and all the know how.

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Dark-sided Flycatcher from my evening spot in the garden tonight. New to the Bangsaen garden list so this - and an Oriental Praticole Flyover about a week ago - bring the garden list up to 88, I think.

It's only the second time I have definitively ID'd Dark-sided - had one when iI lived in Surin - but that doesn't say much as i may well have overlooked them dozens of times. I get Asian Brown so regularly I pay them little notice and this bird was right where my Asian Brown usually is. But something seemed odd. Good looks with bins first and then these fuzzy pics seem to confirm DS flycatcher.

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I've seen Dark-sided several times, always at the very tops of trees, and always pretty well the last migrant to go through. Two kinds, one with clear dark flanks and a white line down the middle, and the other fuzzy grey right across the underparts. I haven't been to the usual location this year; it's too dry, and a long way through burnt-out paddies for the hope of one bird! Robbynz had some nice photos on the Birdwatching in Isan thread.

In recent weeks, I've tended to follow the water, i.e. walk along the immigration canal, and then alongside the village reservoir. The Lesser Whistling Ducks, which gather there before spreading out into the wet paddies to breed, have just arrived (3 on 4th, 63 yesterday, and 80 today), there are three Little Cormorants, and today, in a spray of dried bamboo seeds, a Chestnut-headed Bee-eater, only my second here. It was also the locality for the last Black Drongo and the last Brown Shrike, while Dusky Warblers were daily until the beginning of this week.

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Looking at the yard lists on the thread, noticed no one else has Pink-necked Pigeon. They are abundant and presumed breeding in the patch behind my building in BKK. Beautiful birds for sure. Apologies for the crudity of these pix. They were taken at distance and enhanced to the max. Going to get a new super-zoom digital camera and will post (hopefully) better pix soon. For now these will have to do...

A beautiful bird that, like Ajornorth, I've never seen. One of the few birds that would be immediately obvious!

Every now and again I see a v small bird (wren size) flitting about scooping up aphids (?) from plants around the patio. Does anyone know what this may be?

Its not a Humming bird as it 'settles' on stems, rather than hovering.

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Not to mention the little known fact that Hummingbirds are only found throughout the Americas and Caribbean!

Can you give a bit more detail to the bird's description? Colors, bill shape and size, eye ring, eye line or brow, wing bar(s)?

Flowerpeckers, Sunbirds and Warblers come immediately to mind.

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Speaking of Hummingbirds...Flag if inappropriate, as these pix are obviously not from Thailand, but rather from my yard in Marietta, Georgia USA before the digital camera age! The first is a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird and the 2nd an immature male.

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Great humming bird pics, Skeptic.

I'd say that 9 times our of 10 when someone in Thailand thinks they have seen a humming bird it's one of the sunbirds. (the other 1 out of 10 have usually seen a hummingbird hawk-moth, though nor perching and eating aphids!)

Where are you Dick Dasterdly.

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