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Nokkeaw

What schools allow you to leave once finished teaching?

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Hello everyone,

I would like to know what kind of school allows english teachers to leave once they have finished their teaching and not need to go on weekends. I am aware that some language schools have this policy but there's a lot of work on weekends.

I always wanted to take a thai language course but with my previous job after working 8 hours per day I was too tired to go anywhere else except home. So I would appreciate recommendations about schools that follow this policy so that I can study thai and do some tutoring to get extra cash. Is it more likely to happen in universities, international schools, etc?
Thanks.

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I'm at a university - so my comments reflect this universe.

For me, this issue was quite clearly laid out by the Department Head and by our departments "HR" ladies (HR is actually centralized for us, but each Faculty or major department does have their own sub-office responsible for some of the process and paperwork, but operates largely under the main HR office control.

I am allowed to arrive or leave largely as I want -- so long as I am present and "check in" before my scheduled class times (that's in the department office) start, and check-out after class ends.

The CI/CO process is more to be sure that an instructor turns in any keys or special equipment that may have been used, as well as the attendance roster.

However, I am required to have and post a schedule of office hours -- and I am expected to be physically in my office and available to enrolled students during these hours.

Not being in your office during posted office hours is for us a big no-no that will get you a fairly sharply worded 'reminder' from the department head the first time -- I don't know anyone who has done that twice.

Outside of that- class time and office hours - I am pretty free to come and go as I wish.

We do have a provision in our contract that prohibits (with a few minor exceptions) working or receiving compensation for any activities performed during school hours which they defined as 08.00 to 15.00 Monday to Friday except recognized state holidays and other days as approved by the university administration.

I find myself in my office a fair bit as I rarely take work home- and the university prohibits taking some materials home without prior approval. So, this issue for me, has never come up as a barrier.

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I'm at a university - so my comments reflect this universe.

For me, this issue was quite clearly laid out by the Department Head and by our departments "HR" ladies (HR is actually centralized for us, but each Faculty or major department does have their own sub-office responsible for some of the process and paperwork, but operates largely under the main HR office control.

I am allowed to arrive or leave largely as I want -- so long as I am present and "check in" before my scheduled class times (that's in the department office) start, and check-out after class ends.

The CI/CO process is more to be sure that an instructor turns in any keys or special equipment that may have been used, as well as the attendance roster.

However, I am required to have and post a schedule of office hours -- and I am expected to be physically in my office and available to enrolled students during these hours.

Not being in your office during posted office hours is for us a big no-no that will get you a fairly sharply worded 'reminder' from the department head the first time -- I don't know anyone who has done that twice.

Outside of that- class time and office hours - I am pretty free to come and go as I wish.

We do have a provision in our contract that prohibits (with a few minor exceptions) working or receiving compensation for any activities performed during school hours which they defined as 08.00 to 15.00 Monday to Friday except recognized state holidays and other days as approved by the university administration.

I find myself in my office a fair bit as I rarely take work home- and the university prohibits taking some materials home without prior approval. So, this issue for me, has never come up as a barrier.

Thanks for your answer. I have a few questions about what you said:

- How many office hours do you have per week?

- How many teaching hours do you have per week?

- Finally, If one day you finish teaching before afternoon, why you are not allowed to do tutoring at 1pm or 2pm? Could you get in trouble if your university finds out?

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I'm at a university - so my comments reflect this universe.

For me, this issue was quite clearly laid out by the Department Head and by our departments "HR" ladies (HR is actually centralized for us, but each Faculty or major department does have their own sub-office responsible for some of the process and paperwork, but operates largely under the main HR office control.

I am allowed to arrive or leave largely as I want -- so long as I am present and "check in" before my scheduled class times (that's in the department office) start, and check-out after class ends.

The CI/CO process is more to be sure that an instructor turns in any keys or special equipment that may have been used, as well as the attendance roster.

However, I am required to have and post a schedule of office hours -- and I am expected to be physically in my office and available to enrolled students during these hours.

Not being in your office during posted office hours is for us a big no-no that will get you a fairly sharply worded 'reminder' from the department head the first time -- I don't know anyone who has done that twice.

Outside of that- class time and office hours - I am pretty free to come and go as I wish.

We do have a provision in our contract that prohibits (with a few minor exceptions) working or receiving compensation for any activities performed during school hours which they defined as 08.00 to 15.00 Monday to Friday except recognized state holidays and other days as approved by the university administration.

I find myself in my office a fair bit as I rarely take work home- and the university prohibits taking some materials home without prior approval. So, this issue for me, has never come up as a barrier.

Thanks for your answer. I have a few questions about what you said:

- How many office hours do you have per week?

- How many teaching hours do you have per week?

- Finally, If one day you finish teaching before afternoon, why you are not allowed to do tutoring at 1pm or 2pm? Could you get in trouble if your university finds out?

I must have the greater of: 0.5hrs per hour of instruction time or 8 hours. You must also have hours on at least 2 days per week (so you can't cram them into just one day). I know the numbers are different or different staff. Why, I don't know.. But I know some have fewer office hours required, some have more. I'll bet that it's based on what you teach and what the department head feels is appropriate.

I teach 5 classes of 1.5 hours per section.

I didn't ask the head or anyone else as to the "why".. I suspect - and this is just my guess, they don't want people undermining/shorting their university work to gain outside income. The rules do say that violations can result in discipline up to termination, but that is decided by the department head and my be appealed to a grievance-type committee.

I do leave campus a few times a week.. But I come back later in the day/afternoon... I trudge to the mall, drop off mail at the PO, hit the bank, etc... But for me personally, I have enough to do (with the required office hours carved out) that Id be a little behind the ball if I did leave to do outside work or just left early - after class, on a regular basis.

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The two government schools I worked at we were told not to leave before closing time but everyone did. Just don't make it too obvious like a bag swung over your shoulder.

We didn't have lesson plans just followed the books as per directed. I live close by to last place and if I had 2 - 3 hours break I'd go home and do the washing and ironing.

Might sound lazy but I was the only one who would turn up to assembly and classes on time and if I could help out in anyway I would. That's better then sitting on your behind whinging all day.

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The college I work at allow me to come and go as long as I attend my classes. When I had my interview with the director we came to this deal as he knew he was paying me a lesser salary than most schools around town. The 1st semester was fine and it all worked out. The start of the second semester they did try and tell me that the vice director wanted me to stay on campus all day. I basically asked them if they had increased my salary, to which their reply was no. So I just reminded them about the meeting with the director and what he had promised. It never arose again. I gave them my mobile number plus my e-mail, so if something comes up they can contact me. They have decided to continue my contract so I will see if they try to pull the sit in an office all day shenanigans again. They will get the same question and I am sure I will get the same response. No way am I wasting my time sitting in an office when I can do other things when I am not teaching.

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While some universities may allow you to come and go as you please, you may only get 2 weeks holiday per year at a government university. So it's best to look at this closely. If you are teaching graduate students, you may also need postgraduate qualifications. My private school requires us to be there all day, bu we do get good holidays on a 12 month contract. Schools/universities vary in their policy, so you need to follow up on them individually.

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I'm at a university - so my comments reflect this universe.

For me, this issue was quite clearly laid out by the Department Head and by our departments "HR" ladies (HR is actually centralized for us, but each Faculty or major department does have their own sub-office responsible for some of the process and paperwork, but operates largely under the main HR office control.

I am allowed to arrive or leave largely as I want -- so long as I am present and "check in" before my scheduled class times (that's in the department office) start, and check-out after class ends.

The CI/CO process is more to be sure that an instructor turns in any keys or special equipment that may have been used, as well as the attendance roster.

However, I am required to have and post a schedule of office hours -- and I am expected to be physically in my office and available to enrolled students during these hours.

Not being in your office during posted office hours is for us a big no-no that will get you a fairly sharply worded 'reminder' from the department head the first time -- I don't know anyone who has done that twice.

Outside of that- class time and office hours - I am pretty free to come and go as I wish.

We do have a provision in our contract that prohibits (with a few minor exceptions) working or receiving compensation for any activities performed during school hours which they defined as 08.00 to 15.00 Monday to Friday except recognized state holidays and other days as approved by the university administration.

I find myself in my office a fair bit as I rarely take work home- and the university prohibits taking some materials home without prior approval. So, this issue for me, has never come up as a barrier.

Thanks for your answer. I have a few questions about what you said:

- How many office hours do you have per week?

- How many teaching hours do you have per week?

- Finally, If one day you finish teaching before afternoon, why you are not allowed to do tutoring at 1pm or 2pm? Could you get in trouble if your university finds out?

Is that a rhetorical question?

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The college I work at allow me to come and go as long as I attend my classes. When I had my interview with the director we came to this deal as he knew he was paying me a lesser salary than most schools around town. The 1st semester was fine and it all worked out. The start of the second semester they did try and tell me that the vice director wanted me to stay on campus all day. I basically asked them if they had increased my salary, to which their reply was no. So I just reminded them about the meeting with the director and what he had promised. It never arose again. I gave them my mobile number plus my e-mail, so if something comes up they can contact me. They have decided to continue my contract so I will see if they try to pull the sit in an office all day shenanigans again. They will get the same question and I am sure I will get the same response. No way am I wasting my time sitting in an office when I can do other things when I am not teaching.

The institution pays you a salary and there are many reasons why your employer might want you to stay on campus.

Your boss, or a student wants to see you, or a meeting in the afternoon, etc....

Should the employer really call all his employees and please them to show up at work?

"Please, Mr. Farang, it would be so nice if you'd come to school and do what we pay you for." Why do such places have an office?

Sitting in the office is wasted time for you. You can do other things when you're not teaching. maybe preparing your next lesson(s)?

You might consider to get off your high horse before it's too late. They're watching you and you're not getting paid by the hour.

I hope you don't have to learn this lesson the hard way by not receiving a new contract. Best of luck.

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The college I work at allow me to come and go as long as I attend my classes. When I had my interview with the director we came to this deal as he knew he was paying me a lesser salary than most schools around town. The 1st semester was fine and it all worked out. The start of the second semester they did try and tell me that the vice director wanted me to stay on campus all day. I basically asked them if they had increased my salary, to which their reply was no. So I just reminded them about the meeting with the director and what he had promised. It never arose again. I gave them my mobile number plus my e-mail, so if something comes up they can contact me. They have decided to continue my contract so I will see if they try to pull the sit in an office all day shenanigans again. They will get the same question and I am sure I will get the same response. No way am I wasting my time sitting in an office when I can do other things when I am not teaching.

The institution pays you a salary and there are many reasons why your employer might want you to stay on campus.

Your boss, or a student wants to see you, or a meeting in the afternoon, etc....

Should the employer really call all his employees and please them to show up at work?

"Please, Mr. Farang, it would be so nice if you'd come to school and do what we pay you for." Why do such places have an office?

Sitting in the office is wasted time for you. You can do other things when you're not teaching. maybe preparing your next lesson(s)?

You might consider to get off your high horse before it's too late. They're watching you and you're not getting paid by the hour.

I hope you don't have to learn this lesson the hard way by not receiving a new contract. Best of luck.

I agree.. I'm not casting stones at how others go about their jobs and I acknowledge that standards and expectations can vary, however, what I've found is that while I can't say that I really and truly "work" eight hours a day, I will say that I do work a solid 5 or thereabouts.

... I also can't really say that I have a whole lot of dead time... However, for my classes each year 1 student must make two oral presentations during the year; one per semester- therefore the assumption is that I'll see each student at least 2 times...

however, I do give them the option to have me 'pre-grade' their reports one time before actual submission. To do that, they must come to see me.

I've found at the university level things are much more --- adult, if you will... and this is not meant in anyway, shape or form to be dismissive about the environment of other school situations.

As example, the department head and i did have a fairly candid conversation over coffee, about what the expectations were... and I did ask about leaving or leaving early.

I remember her summation, it was essentially 'we expect you to exercise good professional judgement in managing your schedule. It is ok for you to attend to occasional personal matters during the day, however we expect that your first consideration will always be to your teaching and supporting your students.'

I thought that it was a fair way to put it.

Our department head is the "boss" and she's made it clear that she doesn't play "catch me if you can"... If I need to leave, I can, and can walk straight out, in full view of her office.. She's not going to care or notice -- so long as your "job" and "work" is getting done everything is a-ok.

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The college I work at allow me to come and go as long as I attend my classes. When I had my interview with the director we came to this deal as he knew he was paying me a lesser salary than most schools around town. The 1st semester was fine and it all worked out. The start of the second semester they did try and tell me that the vice director wanted me to stay on campus all day. I basically asked them if they had increased my salary, to which their reply was no. So I just reminded them about the meeting with the director and what he had promised. It never arose again. I gave them my mobile number plus my e-mail, so if something comes up they can contact me. They have decided to continue my contract so I will see if they try to pull the sit in an office all day shenanigans again. They will get the same question and I am sure I will get the same response. No way am I wasting my time sitting in an office when I can do other things when I am not teaching.

The institution pays you a salary and there are many reasons why your employer might want you to stay on campus.

Your boss, or a student wants to see you, or a meeting in the afternoon, etc....

Should the employer really call all his employees and please them to show up at work?

"Please, Mr. Farang, it would be so nice if you'd come to school and do what we pay you for." Why do such places have an office?

Sitting in the office is wasted time for you. You can do other things when you're not teaching. maybe preparing your next lesson(s)?

You might consider to get off your high horse before it's too late. They're watching you and you're not getting paid by the hour.

I hope you don't have to learn this lesson the hard way by not receiving a new contract. Best of luck.

Lostinissan! I have been reading the drivel that you write on this forum for the last few years and to be honest, I am still surprised you still have a job. You rant and rave about your director and the non-SS payment scheme at your school. I was replying to the OP about my situation. Maybe you are stuck in an office Mon-Fri, from 8am til 4pm. I am not. If this upsets you take a chill-pill otherwise you might get too stressed and fall ill with no SS to help you.

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Just to clarify that I didn't open this post to ask about skeaning out from the school/university or not being professional.

I just heard that some schools are okay with the teacher leaving after teaching. Maybe the teacher has some office hours to support students if they need to as another user said in this thread. So, if the school is okay, where is the problem?

Anybody knows if any goverment school follow this policy??

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While some universities may allow you to come and go as you please, you may only get 2 weeks holiday per year at a government university. So it's best to look at this closely. If you are teaching graduate students, you may also need postgraduate qualifications. My private school requires us to be there all day, bu we do get good holidays on a 12 month contract. Schools/universities vary in their policy, so you need to follow up on them individually.

I am at a Govt Uni and got 4 1/2 months off, (with pay), last year, and it will be similar this year too.

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While some universities may allow you to come and go as you please, you may only get 2 weeks holiday per year at a government university. So it's best to look at this closely. If you are teaching graduate students, you may also need postgraduate qualifications. My private school requires us to be there all day, bu we do get good holidays on a 12 month contract. Schools/universities vary in their policy, so you need to follow up on them individually.

I am at a Govt Uni and got 4 1/2 months off, (with pay), last year, and it will be .similar this year too.

Your schedule is very similar to mine in terms of holiday allowances.

There is a chance - at my choosing, if I want to teach mini-classes that occur during holidays (between formal semesters). I've never done them, but I hear they are lucrative ventures, and some of the instructional staff snap up those jobs.

The one nice thing about teaching at the university level (at least for me in and in my experience so far) is that they tend to closely stick to the schedule as given at onset of the semester.

There really are no "surprise assemblies" or other things like that. No school directors that may hijack your scheduled or seemingly cancel classes with little to no advance notice.

From that end, it's a huge plus for me in terms of lesson planning, scheduling of tests and such. In the same manner, there is also little room to explain away any failures on the teachers part to be prepared relative to lesson plans, activities and other classroom matters. Fair if you ask me.

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