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BANGKOK 22 April 2019 09:03
Utley

Please Evaluate My Photo

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OK I just need to say, would anyone wishing to try and edit someone else's image to please ask via PM first and make sure they are OK with it....

I have been there done that before too... and heard about it too, because I did not ask!!!

I know it was good intention to edit Utley's image, but better to ask first! wink.png

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Wow !!! what a beautiful young lady.

First of all,I am not nor do I pretend to be a portrait photographer and so this is not professional advice,just my honest opinion of my thoughts on your photo.

A few points that I see that could maybe be improved on are....

More distance between the subject and background ( already mentioned by others) to avoid reflection and shadows.

Maybe a less vibrant backdrop material and definitely make sure that there are no creases in the material.My eye was drawn immediately to the floor in your first image.

Also,the pose of the young lady looks a little rigid and stiff to me.To me it looks like she is hooking her foot behind her calf to try and keep balance.

Lastly and most importantly.the face is far too blurry,the face is the most important feature in any portrait and so should be the main focal point,especially the eyes!

All in all,I think you did a good job and thank you for being brave enough to allow us to evaluate your image.

Could you maybe share your exif data and what gear you were using?

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As stated before, the colour is reflected from the background.

Move the subject further from the background, use lighter coloured background, subject is lighted from behind the camera (can see shadow on background of subject and chair) use additional lighting to left & right and from above camera angle to dispel the shadows and soften the colour reflection on subject. Use diffuser on lights used on face to soften the features.

Equal mixtures of the colours, red, green and blue give white and by using any of these colours will throw your balance off. If using green background, consider red and blue filters on lights to redress the balance.

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Wow !!! what a beautiful young lady.

First of all,I am not nor do I pretend to be a portrait photographer and so this is not professional advice,just my honest opinion of my thoughts on your photo.

A few points that I see that could maybe be improved on are....

More distance between the subject and background ( already mentioned by others) to avoid reflection and shadows.

Maybe a less vibrant backdrop material and definitely make sure that there are no creases in the material.My eye was drawn immediately to the floor in your first image.

Also,the pose of the young lady looks a little rigid and stiff to me.To me it looks like she is hooking her foot behind her calf to try and keep balance.

Lastly and most importantly.the face is far too blurry,the face is the most important feature in any portrait and so should be the main focal point,especially the eyes!

All in all,I think you did a good job and thank you for being brave enough to allow us to evaluate your image.

Could you maybe share your exif data and what gear you were using?

Olympus OM-D E-M1 with a M.Zuiko Lens: 25mm F1.8
ISO 100; f stop 1.8 shot in raw format
This was a test shoot to see if the young lady had potential as a model. This was her first time before a camera (other than selfies) and she was a little nervous and stiff. I'll work on focusing on the eyes. This was also my first time using this backdrop. Maybe I'll put it in storage.
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As stated before, the colour is reflected from the background.

Move the subject further from the background, use lighter coloured background, subject is lighted from behind the camera (can see shadow on background of subject and chair) use additional lighting to left & right and from above camera angle to dispel the shadows and soften the colour reflection on subject. Use diffuser on lights used on face to soften the features.

Equal mixtures of the colours, red, green and blue give white and by using any of these colours will throw your balance off. If using green background, consider red and blue filters on lights to redress the balance.

I used 4 lights in total; 2 white umbrellas - 45 degree angle on each side of the subject, above the subject angled downward; a large 7' hexagon softbox directly in front of the subject; and 1 smaller softbox at an angle pointing upward at the subject's face. The lighting I use does not lend itself to colored filters.

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 with a M.Zuiko Lens: 25mm F1.8
ISO 100; f stop 1.8 shot in raw format
This was a test shoot to see if the young lady had potential as a model. This was her first time before a camera (other than selfies) and she was a little nervous and stiff. I'll work on focusing on the eyes. This was also my first time using this backdrop. Maybe I'll put it in storage.

I also have the EM-1 and one of the focus modes you can have the camera go for the left eye, the right eye, or best of all, the nearest eye in the shot. For portraits that probably should be used nearly all the time.

Also, you should have used a fill flash at low power and reduce the ambient light. That would remove the shadows and the green.

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 with a M.Zuiko Lens: 25mm F1.8
ISO 100; f stop 1.8 shot in raw format
This was a test shoot to see if the young lady had potential as a model. This was her first time before a camera (other than selfies) and she was a little nervous and stiff. I'll work on focusing on the eyes. This was also my first time using this backdrop. Maybe I'll put it in storage.

I also have the EM-1 and one of the focus modes you can have the camera go for the left eye, the right eye, or best of all, the nearest eye in the shot. For portraits that probably should be used nearly all the time.

Also, you should have used a fill flash at low power and reduce the ambient light. That would remove the shadows and the green.

I have the focus set for the nearest eye.

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""Just a thought...."" I do realise that it is under lights and that you have set the white balance for that situation, but if you try either the shade or cloud setting you may find it will soften the skin/warm tones and kill the green on the neck... You should still have the depth in the green on the wall and her jacket. This will have to be done back at the raw files, but I am guessing you knew that.. I find that the photo has a nice line in it going from top right to bottom left,,, giving it a thumbs up from me...

andy...

Edited by andymarr

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""Just a thought...."" I do realise that it is under lights and that you have set the white balance for that situation, but if you try either the shade or cloud setting you may find it will soften the skin/warm tones and kill the green on the neck... You should still have the depth in the green on the wall and her jacket. This will have to be done back at the raw files, but I am guessing you knew that.. I find that the photo has a nice line in it going from top right to bottom left,,, giving it a thumbs up from me...

andy...

Thanks for the suggestion Andy and thanks for the thumbs up.

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I think you over complicated your lighting. Your big soft box and an umbrella for fill on the face would have given some more natural lighting, with a small but bright hair light glancing at a high angle behind. Keep your lights more than 50% above eye level for this style of portrait. Under lighting is hard to pull off and usually gives unwanted shadows. And in this case the green spill is inhabiting those shadows. Crop it to hide the feet because they are tucked unnaturally. And crop off most of the green to the left. It really overpowers the subject.

Nice to see someone using lights. Lights are a treasure trove.

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I think you over complicated your lighting. Your big soft box and an umbrella for fill on the face would have given some more natural lighting, with a small but bright hair light glancing at a high angle behind. Keep your lights more than 50% above eye level for this style of portrait. Under lighting is hard to pull off and usually gives unwanted shadows. And in this case the green spill is inhabiting those shadows. Crop it to hide the feet because they are tucked unnaturally. And crop off most of the green to the left. It really overpowers the subject.

Nice to see someone using lights. Lights are a treasure trove.

Thanks for the suggestions. I think that I fell into a trap of - since I have it I should use it. I'm going to experiment with a "less is better" concept.

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35 mm/1,8 is not appropriate setting for a portrait. That is the main reason why the photo has no atmosphere and the background is too prominent

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On 28/03/2017 at 5:15 PM, HeikoJT said:

35 mm/1,8 is not appropriate setting for a portrait. That is the main reason why the photo has no atmosphere and the background is too prominent

1. It's not a portrait, it's a full body shot.

2. It's 25mm not 35mm (albeit with a 50mm effective focal length because of the crop sensor).

3. F1.8 is more than sufficient to blur out a background, provided the background is not right next to the subject as in the OP's case. Attached is with a 25mm lens on the same camera at F1.8

P1030346.jpg

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When you get evaluation you asked for  you should not argue.

Edited by HeikoJT

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38 minutes ago, HeikoJT said:

When you get evaluation you asked for  you should not argue.

When you post incorrect information you should expect to be corrected.

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