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silver sea

Original Green Book Needed when Travelling Thailand - Lao?

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My current visa is coming to an end. Next week, I shall go to Lao to get a Single Entry Tourist Visa (SETV)

I shall be travelling from Thailand to Vientiane and back again on my motorcycle. The person (Farang) I bought the bike from says that I do not need to take the Green Book with me; I only need to show photocopies of the relevant page in the book.

I have however just noticed THIS ARTICLE from the Internet. If you look at the text under photo #3 you will see that the original green book is required; copies will not be accepted.

If you have to take the original book with you, then there is always a danger that it will get lost or stolen; and then you will have problems when, later on, you want to sell the bike.

Does anyone have experience of taking their motorcycle across the border e.g. the Friendship Bridge at Nong Khai please?

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Moved to the Motorcycles in Thailand forum.

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I guess you take an original passport, so what's the problem???

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I guess you take an original passport, so what's the problem???

If you lose your passport, you can at least get a replacement. If you lose the Green Book, as I understand it, you cannot get a new one, which means, among other things, you can't sell the motorbike.

So the problem is that I do not want to take the original Green Book with me, unless I have to, because it might get lost or stolen. Why take the risk, if photocopies are acceptable?

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I believe after getting a police report, a replacement can be obtained. Gawd knows how long that might take.

I have a 'hunch' (only a hunch) that p/copies are not acceptable but best of luck.

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I have never tried to leave to Laos without a book but I know it's been scrutinized and compared to my TM2/3 before being passed into customs.

From what I gather you are required to carry the green book because

1. It's forbidden for hire purchase vehicles to be taken out ( the book would be with the company )

2. The bike could be stolen.

You can get a replacement green book, it's a ball ache - but really the best thing is to store it so you don't loose it.

You could always go to the border and try "well I didn't bring it because I thought I might loose it"

I don't believe photocopies are accepted - ask on DELETED - the guys move between Thailand and Laos a lot, they will know for sure.

PM for Details

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papa lost a green book.

police report: B20, 15 minutes.

New GB : B200 and a couple hours @ LTO.

New passport: Expensive, inconvenient, week-ten days.

Photo copies of either document, not sufficient for X-ing.

Otherwise, your theory is ok.

Or just leave bike at border guarded lot, taxi to embassy.

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You need the original green book, copies of it and a translation form from DLT

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Thank you to everyone who took the trouble to read my post, and also to those who replied. From my own personal experience this week, you do need the original Green Book, at least on the outward journey.

Last Monday, I arrived about 11.40 am at Nong Khai and the Freedom Bridge, and saw a sign that bicycles and motorcycles were not allowed to use the bridge. However, there were not many people about; it was a quiet day. I felt sure that everything would be OK.

It took about 50 minutes to complete their various forms and then visit the various processing booths. There was additional paperwork because of my motorbike. Fortunately, I had the original Green Book which showed I was the owner; photocopies would not have been accepted.

I did not have to produce a 'translation' of the Green Book. I have to admit that I am not sure why you need a translation; it is unclear what the language the translation is supposed to be in.

I had seen the visa official first. He then referred my to the official processing applications to take vehicles across the border. She printed off the relevant document and then sent me to her colleague in the next booth. He stamped the form and I said I could now cross over the border, and held up both hands as fists to indicate the riding of a motorbike.

Fortunately, I knew that my passport had not been stamped with an exit stamp, so I returned to the first official. Phew! He charged me 40 THB.

I crossed over the Bridge and entered Lao. The officials were very polite and helpful, just as they had been on the Thai side.

It took about 45 minutes to deal with all the paperwork. First, I had to fill in two forms to obtain a Lao visa, and was charged 35 USD. Next, I had to go to another office to have my motorbike registered. Again, I had to show them the original Green Book of ownership. A third official in another booth entered the information on the computer and charged me 200 THB. Finally, I showed the paperwork to a fourth official, who raised the barrier and waved me through into Lao.

Passing from Thailand to Lao had taken about 90 minutes. It certainly helped going on a quiet day.

On the return journey, it took 10 minutes to deal with the Lao officials, and another 10 minutes with the Thai. I just handed over the forms that I had completed for them on the outward journey. Again, you just have to be careful when they indicate you are free to go through; you need to stop and ask yourself whether your passport has been stamped 'in' or 'out'. Your bike might be 'legal' but what about yourself? Does your passport have all the correct stamps?

The only other problem was that crossing the bridge from Lao to Thailand I started on the wrong side of the road. The cars had stopped at a gate while a train passed through. Being on a motorbike I worked my way along the line of traffic to the front. The gates opened and I shot off first. I was driving on the right hand side of the road and then saw a line of traffic fast approaching from the Thai side. I then remembered that when I had driven from Thailand, I had been on the left side. I quickly moved over to the correct side.

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Of course, Laotians can read it but presumably, the translation document is to save any misunderstanding - English is the official language of ASEAN as we are often reminded.

Better to have it and plenty of copies of your documents, Laos customs and immigration officials sometime have their moments asking for multiple copies of documents just for "fun"

Glad everything went ok for you.

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Nope, don't need a translation. Been many times. Just apply for vehicle passport (you will need proof of ownership to get one). That and passport is all they want to see in Laos. They don't even check to see if the vehicle is insured however, I would recommend paying for the basic liability insurance available at the border crossing. Have fun!

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