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BANGKOK 18 July 2019 14:08
Dagnabbit

Naltrexone & Disulfiram - personal experiences

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.
I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.
One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...
"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "
I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!
It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.
As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png
In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.
Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.
Edited by Dagnabbit
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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.
I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.
One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...
"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "
I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!
It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.
As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png
In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.
Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I believe you are confusing spiritual with Religion. I could complicate it but I prefer to keep it simple. Spiritual is the way I interact with the world about me. Religion is a system of worship. Have you never heard of people being religious about the way they approach some thing. Money a piece of work to be done or many things.

I know a person once that was using antibuse and took a drink. It cured him he hasn't taken any antibuse since. tongue.png

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If the naltrexone stops you getting the "buzz" and you are an alcoholic, surely the day will come when you say, "#!@& this", and stop taking the drug.

That's what happened with me and antabuse.

Everyone has a spirit, soul, being, or whatever you want to call it.

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I would like to give my experiences with Disulfiram and Naltrexone. This may help anyone hoping to incorporate either drug into their arsenal against the demon drink.

Thanks, Dagnabbit, for sharing your experiences with these drugs. You give the sort of useful information that others, who advocate the use of these types of drugs, often forget to provide. I think it is also important to stress that you were using these drugs while 'seeing somebody', presumably some sort of professional counsellor; so while you were buying the meds yourself without a 'script, which is perfectly legal here in Thailand, you were nevertheless getting some sort of help and the use of these meds met with that advisor's approval. I say this because I wouldn't want folk to rush out on their own initiative and start using these drugs without some form of 'supervision' in the broadest of terms.

I'll side step the religion vs spirituality debate as it usually results in too much controversy!

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If the naltrexone stops you getting the "buzz" and you are an alcoholic, surely the day will come when you say, "#!@& this", and stop taking the drug.

That's what happened with me and antabuse.

Everyone has a spirit, soul, being, or whatever you want to call it.

Possibly but in my experience the reality was that it took the shine off drinking. This was not immediate but over time I just found myself not that bothered about a drink.

It wasnt a straight line either. It was up and down initially.

It's a bit like eating. Sometimes you eat when you arent really hungry. Just eating through habit.

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I would like to give my experiences with Disulfiram and Naltrexone. This may help anyone hoping to incorporate either drug into their arsenal against the demon drink.

Thanks, Dagnabbit, for sharing your experiences with these drugs. You give the sort of useful information that others, who advocate the use of these types of drugs, often forget to provide. I think it is also important to stress that you were using these drugs while 'seeing somebody', presumably some sort of professional counsellor; so while you were buying the meds yourself without a 'script, which is perfectly legal here in Thailand, you were nevertheless getting some sort of help and the use of these meds met with that advisor's approval. I say this because I wouldn't want folk to rush out on their own initiative and start using these drugs without some form of 'supervision' in the broadest of terms.

I'll side step the religion vs spirituality debate as it usually results in too much controversy!

I decided I would better relate to an expat counsellor than a local.

So the big hospitals were out and I settled on someone qualified in the US but living here.

To cur a long story short, they couldnt prescribe drugs but I felt that they were qualified enough state-side to see me through.

I agree that self prescription is not a good idea.

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.

I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.

One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...

"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "

http://www.alcoholmd.com/dependancy.htm

I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!

It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.

As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png

In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.

Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I believe you are confusing spiritual with Religion. I could complicate it but I prefer to keep it simple. Spiritual is the way I interact with the world about me. Religion is a system of worship. Have you never heard of people being religious about the way they approach some thing. Money a piece of work to be done or many things.

I know a person once that was using antibuse and took a drink. It cured him he hasn't taken any antibuse since. tongue.png

We can agree to disagree on spirituality.

As for drinking on antabuse. It's ideal if you want to go to a fancy dress party as a ripe tomato.

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As for drinking on antabuse. It's ideal if you want to go to a fancy dress party as a ripe tomato.

I think you should copyright that description! It has a real touch of class! Nice one!

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.
I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.
One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...
"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "
I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!
It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.
As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png
In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.
Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I assure you I was not rubbing anything anywhere.

Willpower :cheesy: An alcoholic CAN'T stop drinking with willpower!

That would be like me trying to stop diarrhea with willpower.

I agree that these drugs are a patch, but a different sort of patch. They are patching over a serious illness and are a barrier to finding how to get to the root cause. This was my experience anyway with both these drugs. Something I never realized at the time was that alcohol was not in fact the problem but the solution. When I stopped taking alcohol I still had the "malady" and took suggestions as how to cure that malady.

I can't provide any research, sorry. I did read it somewhere and it correlates to my experience with Naltrexone and alcohol. But, if you are an alcoholic, sure you are special in my opinion getting those extra opiates when mixed with alcohol. That's why 'normal' people can't understand the alkie.

Why did I waste all those many years trying to drink normally? If I could drink normally, I'd get drunk every night!

I'm an alkie and abstinence is the only way for me to have a happy, joyous life.

It is a physical addiction but a mental obsession - the continual obsession that I could drink normally after repeated occasions when it was obvious that I couldn't. It was akin to believing that I could beat Mike Tyson in the ring - it would be madness getting back in the ring time after time as I could NEVER beat him. It's the same with booze, I was fighting a losing battle until I decided to throw the towel in and that is when I had my moment of clarity.

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.

I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.

One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...

"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "

http://www.alcoholmd.com/dependancy.htm

I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!

It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.

As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png

In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.

Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I assure you I was not rubbing anything anywhere.

Willpower :cheesy: An alcoholic CAN'T stop drinking with willpower!

That would be like me trying to stop diarrhea with willpower.

I agree that these drugs are a patch, but a different sort of patch. They are patching over a serious illness and are a barrier to finding how to get to the root cause. This was my experience anyway with both these drugs. Something I never realized at the time was that alcohol was not in fact the problem but the solution. When I stopped taking alcohol I still had the "malady" and took suggestions as how to cure that malady.

I can't provide any research, sorry. I did read it somewhere and it correlates to my experience with Naltrexone and alcohol. But, if you are an alcoholic, sure you are special in my opinion getting those extra opiates when mixed with alcohol. That's why 'normal' people can't understand the alkie.

Why did I waste all those many years trying to drink normally? If I could drink normally, I'd get drunk every night!

I'm an alkie and abstinence is the only way for me to have a happy, joyous life.

It is a physical addiction but a mental obsession - the continual obsession that I could drink normally after repeated occasions when it was obvious that I couldn't. It was akin to believing that I could beat Mike Tyson in the ring - it would be madness getting back in the ring time after time as I could NEVER beat him. It's the same with booze, I was fighting a losing battle until I decided to throw the towel in and that is when I had my moment of clarity.

I think we can all be open minded enough to agree that different people's experiences are different.

My experience was different from yours and so my outlook us different.

I already mentioned the therapy I undertook but I will not go into details as that is personal.

I'm also not going to get involved with 'dick swinging' contests about the length and depth of my habits.

I'll not ram my experience down your throat or insist you see things my way.

Suffice to say that my experience was very real and is simply repeated here for those interested. I am not here to convert anybody or debate or deride anyone else's method of quitting.

I would appreciate it if you could afford me the same respect.

Edited by Dagnabbit

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Have you actually quit the drink using these methods and if so for how long?

Or are you trying to control the amount you drink?

Edited by Sawan Chan 7
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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.

I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.

One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...

"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "

http://www.alcoholmd.com/dependancy.htm

I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!

It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.

As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png

In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.

Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I assure you I was not rubbing anything anywhere.

Willpower cheesy.gif An alcoholic CAN'T stop drinking with willpower!

That would be like me trying to stop diarrhea with willpower.

I agree that these drugs are a patch, but a different sort of patch. They are patching over a serious illness and are a barrier to finding how to get to the root cause. This was my experience anyway with both these drugs. Something I never realized at the time was that alcohol was not in fact the problem but the solution. When I stopped taking alcohol I still had the "malady" and took suggestions as how to cure that malady.

I can't provide any research, sorry. I did read it somewhere and it correlates to my experience with Naltrexone and alcohol. But, if you are an alcoholic, sure you are special in my opinion getting those extra opiates when mixed with alcohol. That's why 'normal' people can't understand the alkie.

Why did I waste all those many years trying to drink normally? If I could drink normally, I'd get drunk every night!

I'm an alkie and abstinence is the only way for me to have a happy, joyous life.

It is a physical addiction but a mental obsession - the continual obsession that I could drink normally after repeated occasions when it was obvious that I couldn't. It was akin to believing that I could beat Mike Tyson in the ring - it would be madness getting back in the ring time after time as I could NEVER beat him. It's the same with booze, I was fighting a losing battle until I decided to throw the towel in and that is when I had my moment of clarity.

I think we can all be open minded enough to agree that different people's experiences are different.

My experience was different from yours and so my outlook us different.

I already mentioned the therapy I undertook but I will not go into details as that is personal.

I'm also not going to get involved with 'dick swinging' contests about the length and depth of my habits.

I'll not ram my experience down your throat or insist you see things my way.

Suffice to say that my experience was very real and is simply repeated here for those interested. I am not here to convert anybody or debate or deride anyone else's method of quitting.

I would appreciate it if you could afford me the same respect.

Are you suggesting I am swinging my dick?

Are you saying I am trying to ram my experience down your throat?

Are you suggesting I am disrespecting you?

Are you implying that I am trying to deride you?

Good luck!

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Thank for sharing.

In my experience, Naltrexone only helps if you are indeed and alcoholic.

It is an opoid antagonist and the real alcoholic produces natural opiates when drinking. This drug blocks these opiates so the alcoholic drinks "normally" and also I never got the shakes in the morning!

However, the disease of alcoholism is three-faceted:

- Physical

- Mental

- Spiritual

While the naltrexone cures the Physical, the alcoholic still has 2 of the 3 symptoms. I found it much better to quit the booze and work on all three to become a normal human being again.

Thanks for the reply!

Not sure if you are trying to rub salt in my wounds there or not biggrin.png but kudos for you for giving up on willpower alone. I do respect that. It just wasn't something I managed to do myself.

I just saw the Naltrexone as the nicotene patch of alcohol addiction. I don't feel too bad for leaning on it to get the monkey off my back.

One thing I do find interesting in your post is the opinion that only certain people have their opiod receptors stimulated when they drink. From my understanding, (from my therapist) is that this is everybody that drinks. That alcohol stimulates the opiod receptors in everyone and that's what makes it fun...

"All addictive substances impact dopamine directly or indirectly. Alcohol and heroin stimulate a receptor in the brain called the opiate receptor. Heroin binds directly to the opiate receptor, while alcohol triggers the release of naturally occurring endorphins, which then bind to the opiate receptor. "

http://www.alcoholmd.com/dependancy.htm

I'm interested though - is there some research you can point me too that shows this is just certain people? I'd love to get one over on my therapist!

It seems you saying there was something special about me that I got addicted. Well I like feeling special, so I'll take that anyway. Stil, I'd be interested in actual research.

As for 'spirit' - I don't believe such a thing exists, so mine must be missing and so didn't factor highly in my cure. I am happy that you have one though and that it is feeling much better. Mine can't be broken as it's absent! tongue.png

In terms of physical and mental. I don't know how to really distinguish between a physical addiction caused by frequent stimulation of the opiod receptors in the brain and a mental addiction. To me the brain = mental but receptors are physical parts of the brain, so it's hard for me to rationalize between physical and mental in my own case.

Could you expand on that? I find it interesting.

I assure you I was not rubbing anything anywhere.

Willpower cheesy.gif An alcoholic CAN'T stop drinking with willpower!

That would be like me trying to stop diarrhea with willpower.

I agree that these drugs are a patch, but a different sort of patch. They are patching over a serious illness and are a barrier to finding how to get to the root cause. This was my experience anyway with both these drugs. Something I never realized at the time was that alcohol was not in fact the problem but the solution. When I stopped taking alcohol I still had the "malady" and took suggestions as how to cure that malady.

I can't provide any research, sorry. I did read it somewhere and it correlates to my experience with Naltrexone and alcohol. But, if you are an alcoholic, sure you are special in my opinion getting those extra opiates when mixed with alcohol. That's why 'normal' people can't understand the alkie.

Why did I waste all those many years trying to drink normally? If I could drink normally, I'd get drunk every night!

I'm an alkie and abstinence is the only way for me to have a happy, joyous life.

It is a physical addiction but a mental obsession - the continual obsession that I could drink normally after repeated occasions when it was obvious that I couldn't. It was akin to believing that I could beat Mike Tyson in the ring - it would be madness getting back in the ring time after time as I could NEVER beat him. It's the same with booze, I was fighting a losing battle until I decided to throw the towel in and that is when I had my moment of clarity.

I think we can all be open minded enough to agree that different people's experiences are different.

My experience was different from yours and so my outlook us different.

I already mentioned the therapy I undertook but I will not go into details as that is personal.

I'm also not going to get involved with 'dick swinging' contests about the length and depth of my habits.

I'll not ram my experience down your throat or insist you see things my way.

Suffice to say that my experience was very real and is simply repeated here for those interested. I am not here to convert anybody or debate or deride anyone else's method of quitting.

I would appreciate it if you could afford me the same respect.

Are you suggesting I am swinging my dick?

Are you saying I am trying to ram my experience down your throat?

Are you suggesting I am disrespecting you?

Are you implying that I am trying to deride you?

Good luck!

Simple case of he hasn't actually quit drinking and resents the experience of someone who has. OP, denial is something that could cost you your life.

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