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“Twilight Over Burma” banned from public screenings in Burma

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“Twilight Over Burma” banned from public screenings in Burma

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YANGON: -- Burma’s censorship board has decided to ban the public screenings in Burma “Twilight Over Burma”, a foreign-produced film about an ethnic Shan leader and his Austrian wife, claiming that the movie can harm ethnic unity in the country, reported The Irrawaddy Online.

The film has already been pulled from screening scheduled at the opening of the annual Human Rights Human Dignity International Film Festival on Tuesday at Rangoon’s Naypyitaw Cinema. It marks the first time that an international film scheduled for screening at a festival has been banned by the Ministry of Information’s Film and Video Censor Board under the new democratic government.

The ban faced widespread criticism from the public and local filmmakers who branded the ban as a threat to the artistic freedom and liberty of the country.

The film tells a real-life story of an Austrian woman, Inge Sargent, who became a Shan royalty after she was married to an ethnic Shan prince, Sao Kya Seng from Hsipaw, Shan state. He instituted land reform and promoted democracy but was arrested by the Burmese army during the coup in 1962 and later disappeared under mysterious circumstances.

Igor Blazevic, a human rights campaigner and a founder of One World – Europe’s biggest human rights documentary film festival – and jury member at HRHDIFF, told The Irrawaddy that the act of not recognizing citizens’ suffering under the military regime could, in fact, undermine the chances for reconciliation.

He further said that if Burma really wants to address human rights abuses “culture, art and media should be encouraged to bring (into the open) the truth and painful stories about past and current wrongdoings.

Source: http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/twilight-burma-banned-public-screenings-burma/

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-- Thai PBS 2016-06-17

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Quote "He further said that if Burma really wants to address human rights abuses “culture, art and media should be encouraged to bring (into the open) the truth and painful stories about past and current wrongdoings."

Firstly, it's not Burma, it's Myanmar. Secondly, when the country is ready it will address certain issues when it's prudent to do so, and in a timely manner.

Why does the EU still try and dictate to other countries, when clearly their own back yard is riddled with skeletons of the past atrocities, which undoubtedly formed the Europe we have today ?

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He further said that if Burma really wants to address human rights abuses culture, art and media should be encouraged to bring (into the open) the truth and painful stories about past and current wrongdoings.

Firstly, it's not Burma, it's Myanmar. Secondly, when the country is ready it will address certain issues when it's prudent to do so, and in a timely manner.

Why does the EU still try and dictate to other countries, when clearly their own back yard is riddled with skeletons of the past atrocities, which undoubtedly formed the Europe we have today ?

Sorry, but whether intentional or not, you sound like an apologist for one of the most oppressive and brutal military regimes on the planet. There are still many who use the term Burma instead of Myanmar for the political purpose of not recognizing the ruling military elite. And are you justifying current atrocities that are occurring in Burma, fighting is still occurring in the north, because of past historical atrocities elsewhere? And when is it ever not prudent to address human rights abuses?

As for Ms. Sargent, her book "Twilight over Burma, My Life as a Shan Princess" is one of the "must reads" for those interested in Burma. And for many decades now Ms. Sargent has been working, largely behind the scenes, to address the human rights violations that have been occurring in Burma over the past many decades. She is indeed a most remarkable woman.

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He further said that if Burma really wants to address human rights abuses culture, art and media should be encouraged to bring (into the open) the truth and painful stories about past and current wrongdoings.

Firstly, it's not Burma, it's Myanmar. Secondly, when the country is ready it will address certain issues when it's prudent to do so, and in a timely manner.

Why does the EU still try and dictate to other countries, when clearly their own back yard is riddled with skeletons of the past atrocities, which undoubtedly formed the Europe we have today ?

Sorry, but whether intentional or not, you sound like an apologist for one of the most oppressive and brutal military regimes on the planet. There are still many who use the term Burma instead of Myanmar for the political purpose of not recognizing the ruling military elite. And are you justifying current atrocities that are occurring in Burma, fighting is still occurring in the north, because of past historical atrocities elsewhere? And when is it ever not prudent to address human rights abuses?

As for Ms. Sargent, her book "Twilight over Burma, My Life as a Shan Princess" is one of the "must reads" for those interested in Burma. And for many decades now Ms. Sargent has been working, largely behind the scenes, to address the human rights violations that have been occurring in Burma over the past many decades. She is indeed a most remarkable woman.

Quote "one of the most oppressive and brutal military regimes on the planet"

Hardly, perhaps you should start doing your history. This link will enlighten you, given your ignorance.

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