Jump to content
BANGKOK

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Inspire

Two faced language views – why not make all people living in Thailand learn Thai.

Recommended Posts

Two faced language views – why not make all people living in Thailand learn Thai.

Thai21.jpg

Please note this article was prepared by a guest blogger and is the opinion of this writer and not necessarily Inspire

When the UK announced a couple of years back that the government was tightening up requirements of foreigners seeking settlement into the United Kingdom to speak English it was met with overwhelming approval.

It was greeted with views from all and sundry that of course people who expect to live in the UK should speak the language of the country. If they don’t, good riddance.

Yet the very same individuals who would bar people from the UK see no reason to make the slightest effort to learn Thai. Many who effectively live on retirement visas in the country almost have a badge of pride in refusing to learn the language.

They hide behind the supposed “difficulty” in learning Thai and brazenly expect the locals to speak the Queen’s English. Instead of just getting a pith helmet and going out in the midday sun to expound their imperialistic values, these people hide behind their keyboards spouting interminable nonsense as they bash the locals and their education system for not being able to speak their language. It’s absurd. They even refuse to ‘wai’ thinking it beneath them in some way. Many threads on Thaivisa are evidence of these attitudes.

There has been a requirement to learn some Thai and some Thai culture for a number of people who are living in Thailand. Most international school teachers are required to go through a ten module twenty hour course run by the Teachers’ Council that includes aspects of the Thai language and culture. This is something but actually very little. Teachers in local school may do more…or less. And what about other jobs? Why should learning Thai not be a requirement for extending any work permit?

People working here in all professional capacities and expecting to get work permits should be made to enroll in courses in the Thai language and culture. And not just a few hours – how about make it two hours a week for a year at least 100 hours. And if it is not done….yeh, good riddance and som nam naa. (I won’t write that in Thai as so few will understand it).

Full story: http://www.inspirepattaya.com/lifestyle/two-faced-language-views-make-people-living-thailand-learn-thai/

inspire-pattaya1.jpg
-- Inspire Pattaya 2016-06-19

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a good idea to me. I know my life and friendships have been enriched by being able to speak Thai.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't foreigners seeking settlement (residence) in Thailand required to learn to lingo as part of the application process ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years ago I want to the YMCA here in Chiang Mai to learn Thai. There were 6 of us in a "special class". All over 50, and with their "best" teacher. Not a day went past when we didn't have to look at each other in total confusion and whisper: "What did she say?" Her English was so atrocious that we could barely understand her 75% of the time. We all passed, somehow, and all vowed never to return.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The writer explicitly mentions retirement and work visas, this in no way equates to an immigration or settlement status, it is only a visa extension. I am functional in spoken Thai, many people I know are not but that is their choice, or aptitude.

If I were given same business rights as a Thai, I would gladly continue my language study.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The writer explicitly mentions retirement and work visas, this in no way equates to an immigration or settlement status, it is only a visa extension. I am functional in spoken Thai, many people I know are not but that is their choice, or aptitude.

If I were given same business rights as a Thai, I would gladly continue my language study.

totally agree. my apptitude for languages is not very good, i spent 2 years doing weekly classes and struggled (the boofhead in the bottom right corner is mine!). Probaly an equal measure of laziness thrown in.

it doesn't help me that most Thais i know want to learn English. When i first came to Thailand to stay, a mate who spoke fluent Thai advised to get a gf that doesn't speak Englsih and that will force you to learn Thai. Tried that, but the gf wanted to learn English for work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic idea if like the UK you can go on to live permenenantly without the need for a Visa,not have to report to immigration like a criminal,claim free health care and social security and own land and property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd have to agree 'settlement' is the important word.

If you want citizenship you should learn the language.

If you're a temporary resident, no need to bother.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

to get permanent residence in thailand you need to pass a thai language test. is fair enough, i would not want them allowing immigrants into new zealand without being able to speak english. for the vast majority of us in thailand on temporary O and A visas we dont need to speak thai. why should we if we are only here on a year by year basis? this article is poorly researched or just bulls#it made up as click bait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a question of need and negotiation power. UK doesn't need Thai immigrants. No Thais, as far as I know, go to spend their Baht in the UK when they retire. Thailand does well and needs the foreign currency brought in by retirees, so they should not ramp up the barriers to that.

As for those working, it should be driven by need, and the business language. Work in a company that operates in English, then you must learn English. Work in Thai, learn Thai. Simple rule really.

As for everyday living, road signs, news, shopping, etc, it's a personal thing mostly, but there is the initiative driven by ASEAN nations and internationalisation to use English in parallel with their native language.

I don't think making rules to learn Thai would fit to any of the above cases.

But, it's an individual choice.

As for the comments in the OP on the attitudes of some, sure, there are bad cases, but don't base important decisions on those.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to speak Thai , my talkative wife would never get a word in edgeways . I have suggested I go to Khon Kaen , American University ? , but my wife says no , you are not going to Khon Kaen . I have seen courses advertised , but they are expensive . I originally came with a good English/Thai phrase book , but everyone here speak Isaan Thai/Lao .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been here since 1986 and am now 77. I can't remember what I had for breakfast and you want me to leave my home because I can't learn Thai. Shame on you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My spoken Thai is not nearly as good as is my Thai friends' and acquaintances' spoken English. I don't feel obliged to try to learn Thai, but to insist that everyone, from people in the markets to immigration & police officers, speak perfect English is equally unrealistic. Those of us for whom middle age is a distant memory aren't as likely to pick up a new language as easily as some younger person coming here to work.

In America Spanish is an unofficial second language and in many cases someone who is bilingual is available whether in person or when telephoning or interacting online with a business or government office or bilingual signage is shown, but that's just a realistic convenience. The official national language remains English and if you can't function in it, the problem is yours.

I enjoy expanding my Thai vocabulary, but often find myself attempting to speak Thai while the Thai I'm speaking with attempts to speak English.

When it comes to money amounts I wish they'd stick to Thai. Quite often when I'm told the total amount in English I have to repeat what I think they meant in Thai to confirm. Was that song-loi-hok-sip or song-loi-sip-hok??

There are a lot of things I've attempted to learn more about in retirement ... not because they are a necessity, but because doing so is enjoyable and when it comes to speaking Thai it quite often brings smiles to the people I'm speaking with ... whether from appreciation at my efforts or amusement over what I mangled doesn't really matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My daughter and son were enrolled in an expensive international school for many years on an ED visa which

expired as soon as they finished schooling. They had to learn Thai for many years and was a total waste of time

and money as both went back to home country to attend college which is why they went to an international school in the first place. It made me furious as time could have been dedicated to

a far more useful subject.

This country is full of old men on a retirement visa which in effect is an extended 1 year tourist visa. If they were forced

to learn Thai, and very difficult at their age, also a waste as they could lose visa in any year with a stroke of the pen.

If one was to become a legal immigrant or citizen then learning Thai is appropriate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...