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What are you eating? (food porn)

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Well, visited the new Macro yesterday, picked up some nice tortillas, sour-cream, cottage-cheese, Pace Picante sauce and a 900g bag of grated “California” pizza mix cheese and made up some nice quesadillas today. Wife and kid loved them.

I sprinkled McCormick fajitas spice on the melting cheese before folding it over and it added a nice zip...

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Butter-fried a couple tortillas and used the remaining sour cream and some mayo to make a nice dip with a chunk of smoked bluefin. Not too bad.

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Extremely easy to prepare, cheap and delicious

Just put all ingredients at the same time into a pot, bring to a boil, cover with a lid and then simmer at low heat until the meat is tender and that’s it

 

  • 1 kg pig shoulder, preferable with a bit of fat, cut into large (2.5 cm, one inch) pieces
  • 2+ Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 250 ml water
  • 2+ Tbs light soy sauce (Kikkoman or similar)
  • 2 tbs grown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 125 ml vinegar (white wine vinegar, not rice vinegar)
  • Half a bay leaf
  • Chilly powder to taste if you like

(The + means it may be a bit more)

 

Don’t be discouraged by the simple procedure or the amount of vinegar (125 ml is not a typo). Allow to cook for a while until the meat is tender but not until it falls apart (like in my photo below – I did overcook it a bit). Serve with white rice (I prefer Japanese Short Grain). In this case allow the rice even to soak up the sauce.

No glutamate nor pepper involved but you may of course throw in a generous portion of chilly powder to make it compatible for the missus.

This is not one of my most refined receipes (some to follow here) but it certainly is the easiest to prepare and cheapest while it is still interesting.

Try it and enjoy. I am very curious to hear how you like it.

 

Pork Shoulder_DxO.jpg

Edited by moogradod
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38 minutes ago, moogradod said:

Extremely easy to prepare, cheap and delicious

Just put all ingredients at the same time into a pot, bring to a boil, cover with a lid and then simmer at low heat until the meat is tender and that’s it

 

  • 1 kg pig shoulder, preferable with a bit of fat, cut into large (2.5 cm, one inch) pieces
  • 2+ Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 250 ml water
  • 2+ Tbs light soy sauce (Kikkoman or similar)
  • 2 tbs grown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 125 ml vinegar (white wine vinegar, not rice vinegar)
  • Half a bay leaf
  • Chilly powder to taste if you like

(The + means it may be a bit more)

 

Don’t be discouraged by the simple procedure or the amount of vinegar (125 ml is not a typo). Allow to cook for a while until the meat is tender but not until it falls apart (like in my photo below – I did overcook it a bit). Serve with white rice (I prefer Japanese Short Grain). In this case allow the rice even to soak up the sauce.

No glutamate nor pepper involved but you may of course throw in a generous portion of chilly powder to make it compatible for the missus.

This is not one of my most refined receipes (some to follow here) but it certainly is the easiest to prepare and cheapest while it is still interesting.

Try it and enjoy. I am very curious to hear how you like it.

 

Pork Shoulder_DxO.jpg

Nothing wrong with MSG, if you like it. Looks good but a bit of five spice powder, star anaise and cimammon and you'd have had a decent paloor moo.....

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51 minutes ago, moogradod said:

Extremely easy to prepare, cheap and delicious

Just put all ingredients at the same time into a pot, bring to a boil, cover with a lid and then simmer at low heat until the meat is tender and that’s it

 

  • 1 kg pig shoulder, preferable with a bit of fat, cut into large (2.5 cm, one inch) pieces
  • 2+ Cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 250 ml water
  • 2+ Tbs light soy sauce (Kikkoman or similar)
  • 2 tbs grown sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 125 ml vinegar (white wine vinegar, not rice vinegar)
  • Half a bay leaf
  • Chilly powder to taste if you like

(The + means it may be a bit more)

 

Don’t be discouraged by the simple procedure or the amount of vinegar (125 ml is not a typo). Allow to cook for a while until the meat is tender but not until it falls apart (like in my photo below – I did overcook it a bit). Serve with white rice (I prefer Japanese Short Grain). In this case allow the rice even to soak up the sauce.

No glutamate nor pepper involved but you may of course throw in a generous portion of chilly powder to make it compatible for the missus.

This is not one of my most refined receipes (some to follow here) but it certainly is the easiest to prepare and cheapest while it is still interesting.

Try it and enjoy. I am very curious to hear how you like it.

 

Pork Shoulder_DxO.jpg

Similar to Puerco Bibil

 

 

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20 hours ago, grollies said:

Nothing wrong with MSG, if you like it. Looks good but a bit of five spice powder, star anaise and cimammon and you'd have had a decent paloor moo.....

Sure, I did not mean that I think that MSG is bad, just that there is no MSG in this receipe.

I know paloor moo, but I do not like it, the taste of this receipe is quite different.

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20 hours ago, ExpatOilWorker said:

Similar to Puerco Bibil

 

This Puerco Pibil seems very interesting and I would like to try to make one. The very big difference to the receipe I posted is the ease of preparation. This makes the dish unique: Just put everything in a pot and heat it. Done. Every 3 year old could prepare it. And it is still quite tasty.

Edited by moogradod
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After posting an easy receipe here comes something a bit more refined.

 

In German you call that “Linsensuppe”. Following is how it was prepared in our family since decades. The result is so addictive that I may eat up everything alone during one evening. There are two challenges: To get the right ingredients and to cook the potatoes to perfection. But the result is absolutely worth the effort.

 

You need:

  • 2 can of Lentils (2 x 240gr) – see picture, discard the liquid
  • 1 Saucisson (see picture, available at times in Central). This is definitely the first choice, although expensive. A substitute may be “Mettwurst” (available at Friendship) or as a last resort Wiener sausage plus some bacon which you must first cut into small pieces and then fry it to release the taste.
  • 1 piece of Leech (see picture for the size - this is a 5Baht coin in the picture for comparison). If the leech has some more green leaves this is very good as well, but remove the hard outer leaves first. Available at Central.
  • 1.7 l of water
  • 6 Baby potatoes (see picture for size, available at Central)
  • White wine vinegar
  • Half a “cube” Knorr Bouillon (only Beef (nuea) !, not pork, vegetable or chicken) – available at Foodland or Central or salt as a substitute
  • Maggi Seasoning (original if possible, available at Central)
  • Pepper to taste
  • Chilly powder to taste

 

Preparation:

  • Put 1.5 l of the water in a pot and cook the saucisson for 45 minutes.
  • Meanwhile cut the leech into small pieces
  • Prepare the potatoes by removing the skin and then cutting it into small pieces of the same size (see picture of the finished dish) and set aside
  • Remove the saucisson from the pot, remove its skin and cut it into small pieces (see picture of the finished dish)
  • Put the cut leech into the water and boil it by itself until soft.
  • Meanwhile open the cans of lentils and discard the fluid contained therein
  • Then add the saucisson to the leech again and add the Knorr Beef Bouillon or salt and cook for 5 more minutes
  • Then add the lentils and cook everything at medium temperature until the lentils are done. It does not take long.
  • Season with Maggi Seasoning and pepper and adjust the taste by adding some more material from the Knorr Cubes or salt if necessary.
  • Adjust the amount of liquid using the rest of the water if necessary. The soup must be neither too thick nor too watery. Refer to the picture of the finished dish.
  • Add some chilly powder to taste. The liquid should be just burning a bit in the mouth. This is the Thai adoption but I could not do without it in the meantime.
  • Finally add the potatoes, cook further and try continuously their consistency. They must be just not cooked enough (al dente) before you switch off the heat because they will cook further in the hot soup to arrive finally at the exact consistency. Potatoes too hard or too soft will spoil the outcome considerably.
  • Season with the white wine vinegar. The soup resp. stew should taste just a bit sour.

 

Serving:

Serve and put Vinegar, Maggi and Chilly powder on the table.

This Linsensuppe is basically a century old dish. Despite its rustic character it may well be enjoyed with a bottle of cooled Burgundy wine to mimic the “room temperature” of a cave some hundred years ago and imagine some monks eating it.

 

Linsensuppe_finished.JPG

Ingredients_1_small.jpg

Ingredients_2_small.jpg

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2 hours ago, moogradod said:

After posting an easy receipe here comes something a bit more refined.

 

In German you call that “Linsensuppe”. Following is how it was prepared in our family since decades. The result is so addictive that I may eat up everything alone during one evening. There are two challenges: To get the right ingredients and to cook the potatoes to perfection. But the result is absolutely worth the effort.

 

You need:

  • 2 can of Lentils (2 x 240gr) – see picture, discard the liquid
  • 1 Saucisson (see picture, available at times in Central). This is definitely the first choice, although expensive. A substitute may be “Mettwurst” (available at Friendship) or as a last resort Wiener sausage plus some bacon which you must first cut into small pieces and then fry it to release the taste.
  • 1 piece of Leech (see picture for the size - this is a 5Baht coin in the picture for comparison). If the leech has some more green leaves this is very good as well, but remove the hard outer leaves first. Available at Central.
  • 1.7 l of water
  • 6 Baby potatoes (see picture for size, available at Central)
  • White wine vinegar
  • Half a “cube” Knorr Bouillon (only Beef (nuea) !, not pork, vegetable or chicken) – available at Foodland or Central or salt as a substitute
  • Maggi Seasoning (original if possible, available at Central)
  • Pepper to taste
  • Chilly powder to taste

 

Preparation:

  • Put 1.5 l of the water in a pot and cook the saucisson for 45 minutes.
  • Meanwhile cut the leech into small pieces
  • Prepare the potatoes by removing the skin and then cutting it into small pieces of the same size (see picture of the finished dish) and set aside
  • Remove the saucisson from the pot, remove its skin and cut it into small pieces (see picture of the finished dish)
  • Put the cut leech into the water and boil it by itself until soft.
  • Meanwhile open the cans of lentils and discard the fluid contained therein
  • Then add the saucisson to the leech again and add the Knorr Beef Bouillon or salt and cook for 5 more minutes
  • Then add the lentils and cook everything at medium temperature until the lentils are done. It does not take long.
  • Season with Maggi Seasoning and pepper and adjust the taste by adding some more material from the Knorr Cubes or salt if necessary.
  • Adjust the amount of liquid using the rest of the water if necessary. The soup must be neither too thick nor too watery. Refer to the picture of the finished dish.
  • Add some chilly powder to taste. The liquid should be just burning a bit in the mouth. This is the Thai adoption but I could not do without it in the meantime.
  • Finally add the potatoes, cook further and try continuously their consistency. They must be just not cooked enough (al dente) before you switch off the heat because they will cook further in the hot soup to arrive finally at the exact consistency. Potatoes too hard or too soft will spoil the outcome considerably.
  • Season with the white wine vinegar. The soup resp. stew should taste just a bit sour.

 

Serving:

Serve and put Vinegar, Maggi and Chilly powder on the table.

This Linsensuppe is basically a century old dish. Despite its rustic character it may well be enjoyed with a bottle of cooled Burgundy wine to mimic the “room temperature” of a cave some hundred years ago and imagine some monks eating it.

 

Linsensuppe_finished.JPG

Ingredients_1_small.jpg

Ingredients_2_small.jpg

Look nice. Very similar to the French Potée au chou vert.

 

 

Potée au chou vert.jpg

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8 hours ago, moogradod said:

In German you call that “Linsensuppe”.

i beg to differ Sir. what you have presented is a delicious "Linseneintopf" :jap:

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the lentils, spuds and sausage look mighty fine but for my own purposes I'd havta slow down on the sausage as the old digestive system ain't what it useta be...and lentils of any sort hard to find in my area...

 

here's something that I've been playing around with using all local ingredients

 

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/jul/20/meera-sodhas-aubergine-green-bean-thai-holy-basil-stir-fry-recipe

 

could be adapted to using pork or chicken breast and cut down on the tofu, the baked aubergine and the green beans are nice with the sauce...use the cooked tofu later on with instant noodles fer breakfast...

 

 

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On 9/20/2019 at 1:15 PM, ExpatOilWorker said:

Look nice. Very similar to the French Potée au chou vert.

 

18 hours ago, Naam said:

i beg to differ Sir. what you have presented is a delicious "Linseneintopf" :jap:

 

For sure you both had good intentions posting this, but this receipe is quite different from a cabbage based stew. And my German family has called the dish a "Linsensuppe" since I was a child (and I am now 64 years old, so lets call it tradition) although "Eintopf" is of course not wrong at all. May be a regional thing as well (I was born in Nordrhein Westfalen).

 

But does this all matter ? I dont think so.

 

I just hope you prepare the receipe the way I presented it and enjoy the result. This is what matters or dont you agree ? You may then call it "Linseneintopf" 🙂

 

 

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Hi dear !!!! Its look delicious ,Feeling hungry after seeing your post … I will definitely try this at home once .

Edited by Alexendra

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did this one tonight

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/jun/26/rachel-roddy-recipe-tomato-potato-aubergine-stew

 

look closely and you'll find it to be a ratatouille with potatoes added which is OK by me...but it's missing a prime ingredient, courgettes (zucchini), while frolicking amongst the delights of Thailand someone forgets that there are no native courgettes...'whaddaya mean they ain't got no courgettes??? they gots plenty of whatever else ye need...and yer sayin' they ain't got none of the best loved and versatile veges???'...read it and weep mutha...

 

wonder whatever happened to our resident TVF chef 'THAIGERD' who would have something to say about this...and nothing can substitute for a courgette for whatever recipe...I would even use it in a lasagne sauce back in the old days...

 

tutsi with his evil sister: 'and whaddaya think yer doin' with that courgette ('zucchini' in our case being from California) yew pretentious turd?' 'better look out or I'll bend ye over and let ye have it...' riot ensues with the flashing steel of chef's knives and hurled kitchen furniture and implements...

 

 

 

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After Linsensuppe / -eintopf here is another old German dish that I cooked.

Gurkeneintopf (Gherkin stew)

Originally it is done with Gherkins, which I'm lucky to grow a few by myself with seeds from India as Thais don't know or appreciate gherkins. But any other cucumber or even winter melon will do the trick.

Also for the meat I think my mom used to put sausage called Polnische or Mettenden into it, but Wiener/Frankfurter or even Bacon does the trick as well. I used smoked bacon sausage from TGM Thai German Meat products.20191004_205449.jpg

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

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