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Alarm as Toxic Chemical Waste is Dumped in Bang Lamung

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Alarm as Toxic Chemical Waste is Dumped in Bang Lamung

Report by Albert Jack 

 

pat1.jpg

 

PATTAYA: -- August 28, Chonburi residents have reported the discovery of fifty toxic chemical waste drums, labelled Styrene Monomer, that have been dumped near a water source in Tamon Ban Pong, Banglamung.

 

The discovery, at a sand pit, was leaking a ‘strong smelling’ substance that doctors have said could be extremely harmful.

 

The Disease Control Department (DCD)’s Bureau of Occupational and Environmental Diseases director Dr Preecha Prempree said DCD officials have been dispatched to check how much of the substance has leaked out, and how dangerous the situation could be.

 

Another team of health officials have been dispatched to check on the welfare of nearby residents and a quarantine perimeter has been imposed.

 

A crack team of Pattaya One scientists, co-ordinating with US researchers at Google, can confirm.

 

Styrene Monomer is a clear colorless to dark liquid with an aromatic odor. Vapors heavier than air and irritating to the eyes and mucous membranes. Subject to polymerization. If the polymerization takes place inside a closed container, the container may rupture violently. Less dense than water and insoluble in water. Used to make plastics, paints, and synthetic rubber.

 

Reactivity Alerts

Highly Flammable

Polymerizable

Peroxidizable Compound

 

Air & Water Reactions

Highly flammable. Insoluble in water.


Fire Hazard

Behavior in Fire: Vapor is heavier than air and may travel considerable distance to a source of ignition and flash back. At elevated temperatures such as in fire conditions, polymerization may take place which may lead to container explosion. (USCG, 1999)


Health Hazard

Moderate irritation of eyes and skin. High vapor concentrations cause dizziness, drunkeness, and anesthesia. (USCG, 1999)


Reactivity Profile

STYRENE MONOMER is a colorless, oily liquid, moderately toxic, flammable. A storage hazard above 32°C, involved in several industrial explosions caused by violent, exothermic polymerization [Bond, J., Loss Prev. Bull., 1985, (065), p. 25]. Polymerization becomes self-sustaining above 95°C [MCA SD-37, 1971]. Presence of an inhibitor lessens but does not eliminate the possibility of unwanted polymerization. Violent polymerization leading to explosion may be initiated by peroxides (e.g., di-tert-butyl peroxide, dibenzoyl peroxide), butyllithium, azoisobutyronitrile. Reacts violently with strong acids (sulfuric acid, oleum, chlorosulfonic acid), strong oxidizing agents [Lewis, 3rd ed., 1993, p. 1185]. Reacts with oxygen above 40°C to form explosive peroxide [Barnes, C. E. et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 1950, 72, p. 210]. Oxidizes readily in air to form unstable peroxides that may explode spontaneously [Bretherick 1979 p.151-154, 164]. Mixing styrene in equal molar portions with any of the following substances in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase: chlorosulfonic acid, oleum, and sulfuric acid [NFPA 1991].

Belongs to the Following Reactive Group(s)

Hydrocarbons, Aromatic

Hydrocarbons, Aliphatic Unsaturated

Polymerizable Compounds

 

Potentially Incompatible Absorbents

Use caution: Liquids with this reactive group classification have been known to react with the absorbents listed below. More info about absorbents, including situations to watch out for…

Mineral-Based & Clay-Based Absorbents

Dirt/Earth

 

Full story: http://pattayaone.net/pattaya-news/230889/alarm-toxic-chemical-waste-dumped-bang-lamung/

 
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-- © Copyright Pattaya One 2016-08-29

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"A crack team of Pattaya One scientists, co-ordinating with US researchers at Google, can confirm." - so they googled it.

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They don't yet know what's actually in these drums....apart from the labels.....could be anything at all........

But how typical of people here,  to just dump their garbage anywhere?

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Picture just looks like any other beauty spot in Thailand an open dumping ground for thais 

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37 minutes ago, cumgranosalum said:

"A crack team of Pattaya One scientists, co-ordinating with US researchers at Google, can confirm." - so they googled it.

man thats funny. wonder how it ended up in the article.

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28 minutes ago, ChrisY1 said:

They don't yet know what's actually in these drums....apart from the labels.....could be anything at all........

But how typical of people here,  to just dump their garbage anywhere?

 

if I was to engage in illegal dumping, i'm not sure I'd consider labelling the contents of the stuff I was dumping ........I also wouldn't care  what I put in the barrels and whether it corresponded to the labels or not.....but I will defer until the "crack team" can confirm their findings :P

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No mention of authorities working on determining who dumped this poison and going after them.... 2,000 baht fine for littering?

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Should be easy to find where the drums came from,  i.e. imported drums usually have markings on showing origin.  Then check at customs to find out which company imported them.  I guess that will be a wholesaler.  Then check which factories bought large quantities of the chemical.  Check the companies' (probably several) disposal records.  Worldwide in such matters  it's the company paid to dispose of the wastes that's "taken a short- cut" and simply dumped the waste after charging the producer for proper treatment and disposal.  Not difficult to investigate if the right people are used and the authorities have the determination to solve this "environmental crime". ?

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Containment and control before cleanup are the key process steps. The above article seems to be more in tune with possible health side effects of people?  As ChrisY1 said they do not know whats in the drums, what has leaked; labels on a drum are a nice thing to have and someone can read the Safety Data Sheet as per the report; but whats the PLAN?

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There can't be too many companies using this. The EPA should find out and check their records for safe and correct disposal. Totally irresponsible !

 

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I find it strange that it's the DCD that's doing all the groundwork in this case.  Surely the Thais have an Environmental Department or something.  After all who checks any EIAs ( oh sorry they're defunct now ).  As the previous poster stated containment should be the number one action.  However as the dumping took place in a sandpit I would guess that migration of the chemicals would be rapid, so any containment would involve huge costs.  Not sure if Thailand has the expertise to handle such events.  If the chemical is styrene or similar then the biggest risk is groundwater contamination.  Just a few of those drums could make millions of litres of groundwater unusable and could persist for decades.  If they don't find out who did it, then how are they going to recover the cost of the clean-up ?   

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Are those the crack team member of scientists in the picture with no gloves, mask, or any protection at all?

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I live not far from there. And we already have water shortages. This scares me  knowing the lazy Thai authorities, I am very worried.  

They need help from other countries and I doubt they will seek help.  Rather, they will just think " no big problem" and locals will suffer for years to come. 

I doubt Thai water companies ever test our water. 

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From the book- "The 100 hidden core values of Thainess"

 

Chapter 15:

Kids, wives&girlfriends, garbage, revolting slaves, toxic waste,- if you don't want it dump it!

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Labels usually carry a batch number which provides indication of date of manufacture, and would allow the distributor, and end user to be traced.

As to comments about EIA's, they dont apply, as they are studies issued for the undertaking of specific projects, not the dumping of waste.

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