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University degree an obligation?


KevT

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I am looking into teaching English in Thailand. From what I've been reading, it seems that you need a university degree for this to be possible. I find this odd. I will soon have 2 college degrees, can speak 3 languages—one of them being Thai, which I will be nearly fluent by then—actually have some experience teaching, owned small businesses, and will have all the needed TEFL/TESOL training without a problem (250 hours if need be). Put me next to a freshly-graduated university student, and I probably have lots of knowledge, experience and a few $100 000 in my pockets which he or she doesn't have.

 

I understand that schools want qualified and well-educated people, but to consider someone who doesn't have a university degree as inferior and less knowledgable isn't true. University degrees these days cost many thousands of dollars and oftentimes result in very little experience or useful knowledge. Ask many people who earned a university degree and many will tell you it was either a complete waste of time, money and energy, or that it is of very little use to them when you compare to how the real world actually is. Depends on what kind of degree/work though—some degrees are useful; some not at all.

 

So is a university degree truly an obligation to teach English in Thailand?

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Yes, if you want a Work Permit, and/or your employer wants you to have one. If you want to complete the Thai Culture Course, so that you will not be dependent on two year waivers, you must not only have a university degree, but an education degree, to be allowed to that.

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48 minutes ago, KevT said:

and a few $100 000 in my pockets

 

48 minutes ago, KevT said:

University degrees these days cost many thousands

 

You already told us you have the money.  

 

Presumably it is the motivation that you are lacking?

 

Also, I thought you were going to ordain and become a monk?

 

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30 minutes ago, muzmurray said:

You already told us you have the money.  

 

Presumably it is the motivation that you are lacking?

 

No, I don't have that kind of money. But the student would probably have that amount or more in debt. Might not have been the best phrasing.

 

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Also, I thought you were going to ordain and become a monk?

 

 

Still my plan. I would like to improve my Thai before (fluency). I also want to work in my new career and really get used to lay life in all its aspects before ordaining. Better chance of staying in robes if I know what both options are (what I am giving up).

 

 

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The University experience is more about maturing and interacting with other educated people than it is about learning a specific discipline. The Thai's are very correct in demanding people who have actually studied in a real University vs some online nonsense. Good luck to you. 

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9 hours ago, BruceMangosteen said:

The University experience is more about maturing and interacting with other educated people than it is about learning a specific discipline. The Thai's are very correct in demanding people who have actually studied in a real University vs some online nonsense. Good luck to you. 

 

I agree. Though having 2 college degrees and having some teaching experience does have its own weight.

 

Colleges in Canada come before university. I did a total of 6 years of education (actual schools), in two different programs after high school. Sad that I can't teach in Thailand only because I don't have a paper that says B.A. (or other) on it. :sad:

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So from this, I imagine that public and private schools are out of the question if someone doesn't have a university degree. What about other schools, such as those that aren't public or MOE-run schools? Like private English lessons/classes?

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30 minutes ago, tonray said:

I am having trouble understanding how you can have 2 college degrees but not a Bachelor's degree...exactly what college degrees do you have ?

That's a good question tonray. I was reminded however that in Ireland they don't call college degrees "B.A" or "B.S." etc.. Perhaps the poster is from a country which uses other lingoes. Convincing the TCT of that is possible but it takes real work and patience. 

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10 hours ago, BruceMangosteen said:

The University experience is more about maturing and interacting with other educated people than it is about learning a specific discipline. The Thai's are very correct in demanding people who have actually studied in a real University vs some online nonsense. Good luck to you. 

Online universities require real discipline. Holding down a job, taking care of a family and studying also, is a real difficult prospect. The TCT accepts Open University UK degrees, so that cancels out that opinion.

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2 hours ago, tonray said:

I am having trouble understanding how you can have 2 college degrees but not a Bachelor's degree...exactly what college degrees do you have ?

 

In the province in Canada that I live in, we have a school between high school and university. In most countries, students go from high school and then directly to university. Here, after high school, we do 2-3 years in college and then head off to university for 3-4 more years. I considered university way too expensive and not that useful, so I chose other avenues, of which 2 college degrees were part of this.

 

I guess that someone without a university degree in the rest of the world would basically only have a high school degree. 

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1 minute ago, KevT said:

 

In the province in Canada that I live in, we have a school between high school and university. In most countries, students go from high school and then directly to university. Here, after high school, we do 2-3 years in college and then head off to university for 3-4 more years.

But what degree do you have ? Associates degree....we also have 2 year colleges in the USA...but they do not confer a bachelor's degree which is what the MOE here is looking for in a legal teacher.

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2 hours ago, KevT said:

So from this, I imagine that public and private schools are out of the question if someone doesn't have a university degree. What about other schools, such as those that aren't public or MOE-run schools? Like private English lessons/classes?

 

So do private/non-government-run schools require a university degree (private English lessons, etc.)?

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3 minutes ago, KevT said:

 

So do private/non-government-run schools require a university degree (private English lessons, etc.)?

You cannot legally teach without a degree. you will not be granted a work permit and would be working illegally, something that is frowned upon by the government, subject to severe fines and deportation if caught.

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Say for countries where the educational system isn't the same or the naming is different as the US, is there a way to contact the Ministry of Education or somewhere else in Thailand to have the degree be recognized as on par or the same as a university degree?

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