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KevT

University degree an obligation?

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KevT

 

The teachers I know who speak Thai reasonably well use it as last resort in the classroom.   I don't speak Thai well enough to explain things in Thai and I've been teaching English for 3 years now. Only

rarely have I asked for a Thai co-teacher to translate some trickier concepts.  At most schools the grammar is left up to the Thai English teachers and the NES are there for speaking and listening.

I can explain 90% of vocabulary with drawing.

I'll draw and ladder and some stairs but you'll translate into Thai in 2 seconds?

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I have been doing a bit of research into this and found that fake degrees can even get an "official" embassy stamp  - an all-in process to get visa/work permit etc etc.

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2 hours ago, duanebigsby said:

KevT

 

The teachers I know who speak Thai reasonably well use it as last resort in the classroom.

I don't speak Thai well enough to explain things in Thai and I've been teaching English for 3 years now. Only

rarely have I asked for a Thai co-teacher to translate some trickier concepts.  At most schools the grammar is left up to the Thai English teachers and the NES are there for speaking and listening.

I can explain 90% of vocabulary with drawing.

I'll draw and ladder and some stairs but you'll translate into Thai in 2 seconds?

What's Thai for "Caution - overhead power lines !"

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1 hour ago, cumgranosalum said:


I have been doing a bit of research into this and found that fake degrees can even get an "official" embassy stamp  - an all-in process to get visa/work permit etc etc.

You failed to realize that you must bring it to a fake embassy for the 'official' stamp if the degree is fake.

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1 hour ago, tonray said:

You failed to realize that you must bring it to a fake embassy for the 'official' stamp if the degree is fake.

I don't understand your comment - I thought it was perfectly clear that even a fake degree can get a stamp that purports to be from the appropriate embassy...this means that people are not just forging/bending Thai docs but also "impersonating" other countries embassies.

The full extent of this has surprised me a lot.

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OP, working hundreds of hours in Canada and saving up for vacations in Thailand would certainly be an option although getting the four-degree might give you better earning power and provide greater possibilities for satisfying employment in the future.  Good luck.

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On October 6, 2016 at 1:58 AM, jadee said:

I think that many teaching agencies would help the OP find work, even without a degree. It all hinges on the candidate's willingness to relocate and their flexibility regarding age groups. There are always schools desperate for English teachers and ways of working around the issue of a teacher not having a degree. 
It's going to be easy to find work if you can do without a work permit and are willing to live like that. Some schools hire teachers but don't support a WP and have their teachers do border runs or get education visas. 

 

100% legally? Or it wouldn't really be possible without a WP?

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On October 6, 2016 at 3:39 AM, duanebigsby said:

KevT

 

The teachers I know who speak Thai reasonably well use it as last resort in the classroom.

I don't speak Thai well enough to explain things in Thai and I've been teaching English for 3 years now. Only

rarely have I asked for a Thai co-teacher to translate some trickier concepts.  At most schools the grammar is left up to the Thai English teachers and the NES are there for speaking and listening.

I can explain 90% of vocabulary with drawing.

I'll draw and ladder and some stairs but you'll translate into Thai in 2 seconds?

 

We'll have to differ. I just know it from experience from the student's perspective. I know my Thai wouldn't be as good at all if my teachers wouldn't have been able/couldn't speak English. I can ask complex questions (of which aren't discussed in workbooks) and then get complex and complete answers.

 

To get this level of understanding of these explanations, an English-speaking student learning Thai would need to know and understand every individual word, of which every word would require an understanding of their own. Even to ask the questions, he/she would need to know the correct phrasing and grammar in Thai, as well as each word, for the teacher to understand. 

 

It could be that it isn't the best approach for traditional teaching to high school kids, but it's a very very solid shortcut.

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48 minutes ago, KevT said:

 

We'll have to differ. I just know it from experience from the student's perspective. I know my Thai wouldn't be as good at all if my teachers wouldn't have been able/couldn't speak any English at all. I can ask complex questions (of which aren't discussed in workbooks) and then get complex and complete answers.

 

To get this level of understanding of these explanations, an English-speaking student learning Thai would need to know and understand every individual word, of which every word would require an understanding of their own. Even to ask the questions, he/she would need to know the correct phrasing and grammar in Thai, as well as each word, for the teacher to understand. 

 

Maybe not the best approach for traditional teaching to high school kids, but it's a very very solid shortcut. 

 

Try to draw: diligent, decision, false, discipline and intention.

 

Unfortunately, you'll find that Thai students will mostly give up speaking English if you use Thai. I have colleagues who spend half their time talking  to students in pidgin Thai and it's a total waste of time. I even worked with one guy whose contract wasn't renewed because he kept speaking to the students in Thai, though the funny thing was they probably understood more of his English anyway. 

 

My Thai is excellent but very few of my students ever work out that I can even understand everything they say, although sometimes the penny drops when I answer questions they've asked in Thai. It's not because I believe L1 has no place in the classroom because I feel it's a very valuable tool. But you're very unlikely to be teaching a class in Thailand where the positive advantages of speaking Thai outweigh the negatives. Work out how to put it to good use in homework assignments etc. where the students are working on their own or together. You simply spouting the Thai definitions of "diligent, decision, false, discipline and intention" isn''t going to help any students learn the meanings or make your class go more smoothly. Very often, the students will be way ahead of you anyway, looking at the dictionaries on their phones, at their own pace and accessing the vocabulary they want to learn, which is generally much faster than you doing it in Thai.

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1 hour ago, KevT said:

 

We'll have to differ. I just know it from experience from the student's perspective. I know my Thai wouldn't be as good at all if my teachers wouldn't have been able/couldn't speak English. I can ask complex questions (of which aren't discussed in workbooks) and then get complex and complete answers.

 

To get this level of understanding of these explanations, an English-speaking student learning Thai would need to know and understand every individual word, of which every word would require an understanding of their own. Even to ask the questions, he/she would need to know the correct phrasing and grammar in Thai, as well as each word, for the teacher to understand. 

 

It could be that it isn't the best approach for traditional teaching to high school kids, but it's a very very solid shortcut.

 

Not forgetting that Thai children start learning English in P1 at the latest, so at the age of 6, by the time they are M1 they have had at least 6 years of English lessons. You need to equate your learning Thai to a P1 student, and that is why L1 is useful at that stage, but should be phased out as the student progresses.

 

Personally, I never use any L1 in the classroom, my mantra if they don't understand is;

 

Rephrase

Reteach

Teach

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On 10/3/2016 at 8:27 PM, KevT said:

 

 

 

Colleges in Canada come before university. I did a total of 6 years of education (actual schools), in two different programs after high school. Sad that I can't teach in Thailand only because I don't have a paper that says B.A. (or other) on it. :sad:

 

 

Lie.

 

Colleges in Canada do not "come" before university, whatever that means. You must be from Quebec and "CEGEP" or a Canadian "College" is nothing like having a university degree.

 

I am a Canadian immigrant who also speaks a few languages, have obtained both a college degree and a university degree. I guess I get a job in Thailand and you don't.

 

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, theguyfromanotherforum said:

Lie.

 

Colleges in Canada do not "come" before university, whatever that means. You must be from Quebec and "CEGEP" or a Canadian "College" is nothing like having a university degree.

 

I am a Canadian immigrant who also speaks a few languages, have obtained both a college degree and a university degree. I guess I get a job in Thailand and you don't.

 

It wasn't a lie, but these are different places and there are different terms.

 

I don't have a university degree, but it doesn't mean I'll never get a job in Thailand. No need to be condescending. 

 

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Bro, it's just annoying to read a reply after reply telling you that university degree is a requirement in Thailand, but you go on about all the irrelevant diplomas you have and languages that you speak. Completely irrelevant as University degree is the only legal requirement in Thailand.

 

BTW, I finished a 3 year CEGEP in Quebec (btw, CEGEP is not a college, it's more like an extension of high school). Even in Quebec this is not recognized as a university degree. However, University in Quebec is only 3 years instead of 4 and they are dirt cheap, so there is your chance.

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Agreed, regarding your assessment of the OP. In Post # 62 I commented on CEGEP's , and provided a reference for anyone who wants to know what a CEGEP is. And in Post #2 (yes, the very first reply to the OP), I acquainted him with the facts.

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