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4MyEgo

Reducing The Heat In The House

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28 minutes ago, Psychic said:

I used an insulated white metal roof.

If I stick my head through the hole in the ceiling it actually feels much cooler than the top of the room where the heat accumulates.

So much so, that I am considering ceiling vents so that heat can escape.

you have indeed psychic powers :whistling:

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14 minutes ago, Strange said:

 

Get ya some good ceiling fans to circulate that air especially if you use or plan to use air-conditioning. Will help draw in the cooler air from the outside as well. 

airconditioning draws cooler air from outside? :shock1:

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3 minutes ago, Naam said:
19 minutes ago, Strange said:

 

Get ya some good ceiling fans to circulate that air especially if you use or plan to use air-conditioning. Will help draw in the cooler air from the outside as well. 

airconditioning draws cooler air from outside? :shock1:

 

lol he said he wanted to vent his ceiling into his roof area cause the heat was collecting up top. Why do that if you have any intention to run aircon at any time. 

 

Put up a couple ceiling fans and switch the rotation to pull air from the bottom up and circulate. Or if it feels cooler blow from the top down. If your windows are open and there is heat collecting at the top, pulling air from the bottom to the top will help draw outside air into the house.

 

unless of course its just hot as balls everywhere, then just close up and turn the aircon on. 

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22 minutes ago, BuaBS said:

"insulated white metal roof"

 

Why do white & silver metal like on a car heat up ?

Why does reflecting metale like bare aluminum and silver heat up in the sun ?

Why does a mirror heat up in the sun?

Reflective roof tiles ??

 

What is this a riddle? 

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3 hours ago, Denim said:

Yep.....windows are real weak spots when it comes to keeping out the heat. Designed our house to have as few as necessary without making the inside dark.

It's surprising the number of newbies that decide to build a house here and put in as many windows as possible to allow cool breezes to blow through their house.

 

Got those soffit boards all around our house to try and encourage airflow in the attic along with lots of insulation up there.

Why have windows in the 1st place.Why do people bring their western ideas to Thailand when all they have to do is look around at their Thai neighbors.Before i built i checked where the sun goes.The sun never touches my superblock walls.As far as windows i just have frames with security frame and mozzy screen.Wooden shutters are never shut,unless i go away for a month.When i told the missus no windows,she said good,no clean.Learn from the people around you.They worked this out centuries ago,including houses on stilts.

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Good idea, op. For a minute there I thought you were going to bring out the ol insulated-box-with-ice-in-and-fan-on-top air-conditioning alternative. :whistling:

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1 hour ago, topt said:

Any suggestions as to what to do when you don't have any attic - or none that is accessible? The stairspace goes all the way up to the roof as far as I can tell.  I don't open windows/doors upstairs as the amount of dust that would come in is not something to countenance. The roof overhangs in places but no vents at all.

 

Flat roof or peaked roof or ridge?

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I love the idea of the soffit venting panels on the windows that the OP has brought to our attention. 

 

I lease an old 2 story 3 bedroom house, cottage style design roof with old fiber shingles, with no insulation. The main floor windows are all louvered, and uppers are old style swinging multi pane windows, with some permanently open louvered windows on the bathrooms. The top floor heats up during the day a lot, as the attic gets hot like an oven, and it radiates down to the rooms through the ceiling. My follicly challenged scalp is a great gauge of radiant heat from the ceiling. The AC was installed a long time ago as an afterthought in each of the 3 bedrooms, but they are the very inefficient loud old style units, that simply cost too much to run as the cooled air continues to escape out of the masonry rooms and tries to cool the bricks.  My Thai landlord won't spend a single baht for improvements, and I don't want to either, as I don't think I'll be here that long. Coming here from a life spent in Northern Canada, you learn a few things about insulation, and heat transfer that keep you alive, that I don't want to pay for to apply in my situation here.

 

However, I was able to lower my house temp considerably by opening the attic man-access panel in the bathroom, and position an 18" fan in the opening along with a short cardboard box taped up as a duct. The soffit venting is minimal here, but the fiber roof tiles are so loose fitting up top, no additional roof venting was needed to get the air moving up and out. I kept the fan on full during the day pressurizing the attic, and pulling the air up through the house. The ceilings were a LOT cooler, according to my head sensor. In the evening, the attic cooled much faster now after the sun went down, and did not get as hot during the day either. I opened the lower floor window louvers on the cooler side of the house, and it drew in the lower cooler air, pulling it up through the whole house and out the attic. This all worked well, until the evil spirits living in the attic kept watching the wife and daughter while they were in the bathroom, and I had to disassemble the whole rig and put the access panel up again to keep the peace.  Now I just open everything doors and windows, all the time, and use fans.

 

I also planted quick growing bamboo all around the house, in order to give it some shade during the late afternoon where the sun radiates from the sides, and heats up the walls. That is starting to help, as it slowly envelopes the house in foliage, hopefully soon like an ancient undiscovered Khmer jungle temple. 

 

Now if I could only solve the electrocution hazards and wiring fires from poor Thai wiring and installation, and the constant sewage backups during rains flooding the floors, I might live long enough to move out.

 

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2 hours ago, norbra said:

Might consider leaving keys in locks of fire doors instead of trying to find them when you may be under pressure to get out

 

Appreciate the advice, only problem with that is our 2 year old will be hiding them as she can reach the lock/s, when she gets a little older will be doing that.

 

As for now, we have a smoke detector outside our bedroom door and across the hallway is the exit door, keys are clearly marked, and torch is right next to them in the box on top of the bedside table, and everyone knows not to even think about it, as those keys are only for me to use, and if they want to go out those doors for any reason, which they don't, they have to ask me to open and lock them, because I have to know those keys are back in their place, and I check every night before bedtime. 

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2 minutes ago, Gold Star said:

Now if I could only solve the electrocution hazards and wiring fires from poor Thai wiring and installation, and the constant sewage backups during rains flooding the floors, I might live long enough to move out.

 

Damn man just move out. If you are outside of the major areas you can easily get something for 5-6-7k 

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4 hours ago, Denim said:

Yep.....windows are real weak spots when it comes to keeping out the heat. Designed our house to have as few as necessary without making the inside dark.

It's surprising the number of newbies that decide to build a house here and put in as many windows as possible to allow cool breezes to blow through their house.

 

Got those soffit boards all around our house to try and encourage airflow in the attic along with lots of insulation up there.

 

Yep 17 windows, 2 x glass sliding panel doors, two fixed tinted glass panels on either side of the entry doors, and a half size glass brick wall at the rear, having grown up on the east coast of Sydney, one overlooked that the breezes here in Issan, (if any) are far and few between, especially in March/April/May when its time to roast.

 

For the life of me, I just can't understand how Thai's live without air conditioning, sure affordability has some thing to do with it.

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Wood window frames are the best bet, they create a natural heat break, aluminium frames transfer heat from the glass to the walls and heat up the room. Be aware, if you go this route only use wood from the list of ten royal woods that are impervious to everything except a nuclear attack.

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upvc is sold at most of the major home shops now but in certain sizes. The most expensive option, but the best by far. 

 

Op you should look into this if the place you are in now is gonna be permanent. 

 

Any of the local "builders" will be able to install them and day rate is about 300/day. 

 

Would sure be better in the long run than the boards you have up now

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Bamboo leaf thatch, laid over a metal roof, reduces heat absorption considerably.

 

It also cuts down the noise of rain.

 

But possibly too "old/peasant" for many Thai partners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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