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'A clear shot' - US police kill suspect, rescue children


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'A clear shot' - police kill suspect, rescue children

By MARTHA BELLISLE and LISA BAUMANN

 

SEATTLE (AP) — A Washington state police officer responding to a domestic violence call was fatally shot and his fellow officers were still "taking fire" as they removed him from a home, beginning an 11-hour standoff during which authorities say the gunman used two young children as human shields.

 

The fallen officer, Reginald "Jake" Gutierrez, had served with the department since 1999 and was highly respected and experienced, Tacoma Police Chief Donald Ramsdell told reporters Thursday.

 

Dozens of officers had surrounded the home in Tacoma on Wednesday night, urging nearby residents of the working class neighborhood of single-family homes to shelter in place.

 

Early Thursday, authorities say a deputy got "a clear shot" and killed the suspect as officers rescued an 8-year-old girl and a 6-year-old boy.

 

Pierce County sheriff's spokesman Ed Troyer said the gunman had refused to surrender during negotiations. His name was not released.

 

"We were able to get the suspect cornered and trapped, even though he had two kids," Troyer said. "We had a SWAT member who had a clear shot. We fired one round, which struck him."

 

Ramsdell said the incident began Wednesday afternoon when animal control officers working near the house were approached by a woman who said her husband had locked her out and taken her phone. The officers called police.

 

Gutierrez and his female partner went into the home, and Gutierrez was shot as he reached the top of the stairs to speak with the suspect, Ramsdell said.

 

The female officer shot back and ran from the house, taking the wife to safety.

 

Tacoma police spokeswoman Loretta Cool described the hectic scene that led to the standoff.

 

"We had an officer down and shots still firing at the time," Cool said. Police managed to get the officer out "but they were still taking fire," she said.

 

Officers didn't immediately know there were children in the house and became aware of their presence during the standoff, she said.

 

"When they were able to rescue the boy, there was an opening to rescue the girl," Cool said. "That provoked the shot to take the suspect out."

 

Authorities discovered multiple weapons inside the house but did not describe them in detail. Few details were released about the treatment of the children by the suspect.

 

Ramsdell said the suspect did not have a "serious background in regards to criminal history" but there may have been issues with mental illness.

 

Kristi Croskey, who rented the house to the suspect and his wife, was inside the home at the time and barricaded herself in the bathroom before she was able to escape, KOMO-TV (http://bit.ly/2gYPKJb ) reported.

 

She said police came to the residence because the suspect was fighting with his wife and refused to let her back inside.

 

"They said they just wanted to talk to him and then gunfire started, they didn't start it," Croskey told the station.

 

Reacting to the shots fired, officers entered the home and managed to get the wounded officer outside and to a hospital, Cool said.

 

Gutierrez died Wednesday night after undergoing surgery.

 

"We've suffered a great loss and I think the community has suffered a great loss. I don't know how to put that into words," Cool said.

 

The shooting sparked an outpouring of support from the community and public officials, who left flowers at the front of the police department, under a large police badge carried a black ribbon across the center.

 

A procession of law enforcement officers escorted the officer's body from the hospital to the county medical examiner's office.

 

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said "all of Washington grieves with Tacoma, which tonight lost one of their finest."

 

The shooting remains under investigation by multiple agencies, including the FBI and the Pierce County Prosecutor's Office, which will review material to be sure that the police followed their policies in responding to the incident.

 
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-- © Associated Press 2016-12-02
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My condolences to the friends, family and colleagues of the fallen officer.   

 

I think it's important to remember that for every negative report about the police, there are probably 10,000 times they do their job the way they are supposed to and help to keep us all safe....sometimes even from ourselves.   

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Meanwhile, gun-lovers continue to hug their guns, and to send money to NRA in the hope that everyone who wants as many guns as possible - can do so.   Colt and Remington love those gun huggers.  It's just coincidence that nearly every gun nut in the US is seriously overweight.  Does sniffing gunpowder do that?

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The only country, I know of, which has any success with cun control is Japan. 10 years jail for only possession of a gun. Will never happen in the United States as long the NRA exist with her gun nut members.

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1 minute ago, bandito said:

The only country, I know of, which has any success with cun control is Japan. 10 years jail for only possession of a gun. Will never happen in the United States as long the NRA exist with her gun nut members.

I agree with you but I would remind you of the Thai police general, Kamronwit Thoopkrachang, found with a gun in his luggage in Japan who was left off with nothing more than a ban of 3 years from visiting Japan.

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1 hour ago, boomerangutang said:

Meanwhile, gun-lovers continue to hug their guns, and to send money to NRA in the hope that everyone who wants as many guns as possible - can do so.   Colt and Remington love those gun huggers.  It's just coincidence that nearly every gun nut in the US is seriously overweight.  Does sniffing gunpowder do that?

 

thats because in america its prohibitively expensive for the overweight guys to collect bar girls.

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5 minutes ago, Briggsy said:

I agree with you but I would remind you of the Thai police general, Kamronwit Thoopkrachang, found with a gun in his luggage in Japan who was left off with nothing more than a ban of 3 years from visiting Japan.

 

Yeah, you're right but I think he was leaving Japan. Anyway I don't know how this could happen. Him leaving Japan  without being charged.

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7 minutes ago, atyclb said:

 

thats because in america its prohibitively expensive for the overweight guys to collect bar girls.

 

 

       Wrong meds today?

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18 minutes ago, bandito said:

The only country, I know of, which has any success with cun control is Japan.

 

There's quite a few. The US seems to be about the only developed country that can't figure it out.

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20 minutes ago, Rob13 said:

 

There's quite a few. The US seems to be about the only developed country that can't figure it out.

 

Mexico is one of them, but borders with the US that sells to Mexicans... Upss...Trump forgot to mention that...

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3 hours ago, Credo said:

My condolences to the friends, family and colleagues of the fallen officer.   

 

I think it's important to remember that for every negative report about the police, there are probably 10,000 times they do their job the way they are supposed to and help to keep us all safe....sometimes even from ourselves.   

That is true. Lisa Ling did a feature about that on her "This is Life" CNN show during which she was embedded with patrols in the huge hood. The cops there (although she didn't report this fact; it's on the police website casualty page) are murdered at a rate of almost one every other day in the hoods--about 150 last year. But the officer she road with said he'd only fired his weapon once in 16 years and said that was typical.

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1 hour ago, bandito said:

The only country, I know of, which has any success with cun control is Japan. 10 years jail for only possession of a gun. Will never happen in the United States as long the NRA exist with her gun nut members.

Australia has very tough gun laws too, unfortunately it took the Port Arthur massacre to push the politicians into action. Now have very rare occasions where there's criminal use of firearms.

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1 hour ago, Essaybloke said:

Australia has very tough gun laws too, unfortunately it took the Port Arthur massacre to push the politicians into action. Now have very rare occasions where there's criminal use of firearms.

 

 

Same as in my native country. Firearms are illegal and a permit is not easy to come by. Hence, very little gun related crime.

Time for some big countries to grow up and learn...

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1 hour ago, Dustdevil said:

That is true. Lisa Ling did a feature about that on her "This is Life" CNN show during which she was embedded with patrols in the huge hood. The cops there (although she didn't report this fact; it's on the police website casualty page) are murdered at a rate of almost one every other day in the hoods--about 150 last year. But the officer she road with said he'd only fired his weapon once in 16 years and said that was typical.

 Fortunately, not sure your figures are correct!

https://www.rt.com/usa/351969-us-police-killed-increase/

 

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