Jump to content

University teaching shows why Thais' command of English is so abysmal!


webfact

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 749
  • Created
  • Last Reply
2 hours ago, jpinx said:

There are so many versions of English (Spanish also) that it is hard to know where to set the standard, but there is no doubt that most Thai "English Teachers" are hard pressed to have a conversation in English with a native UK English speaker.


Good point.  Since I moved here I've been approached by so many schools to do cash in hand work teaching conversational english.  Obviously I can't because I have no degree or teaching licence but it's a topic they are aware requires improvement.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, djayz said:

Here we go again... if I had ฿ 1 for every time people pointed out the absymal level of English here, I'd be a millionaire by now! 

If the teachers haven't mastered the language, then how are they expected to teach their students?!?!

 

Teachers and professors who have their positions partially thanks to family connections and are never observed by neutral peers with the aim of improving standards. They have no motivation to improve themselves as teachers nor to help their students improve their (students) lot in life. The language center I work at observes all teachers once and sometimes twice a year and conducts regular student feedback surveys. All with the aim of 1) keeping teaching standards up and 2) to check student i.e. customer satisfaction with the teaching staff. 

This could easily be done at the public schools and universities. 

 

I couldn't agree more. My stepdaughter was not allowed to go to the toilet during class until she asked to go to the toilish. Apparently toilish is the actual English word for toilet. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

About 3 years ago my Thai step son's gf (2nd year at Chiang Mai U) asked me and another expat (from Canada & England) to help her with her university English course. After half an hour or so we were shocked. Not only did she have to learn words and concepts we never use, and poorly understand, they were complex to an extreme. We both have some university  education so are not total dummies. Even the sentences she had to learn the meaning of we struggled over as the concepts in the sentence were complicated, and never ever used in normal speech.

 

The students just don't stand a chance here with learning English in school.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Johnniey said:

No, I'm a Scot.

 

There are a few that call me Scotch but I don't want to insult their lack of worldly awareness any more.

I don't think that question is on the worldly awareness test. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jpinx said:

There are so many versions of English (Spanish also) that it is hard to know where to set the standard, but there is no doubt that most Thai "English Teachers" are hard pressed to have a conversation in English with a native UK English speaker.

British English would be a great place to start. I would not for example not recommend teaching pidgin English as spoken in Jamaica.   

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Johnniey said:

What is it a technical/vocational college?

I worked in a Thai university for over 10 years and all the teachers in the English department spoke impeccable English as many of them had PhD's from English universities. They had all studied to a Master's degree level abroad. 

 

The only mistake I often heard was that they used "ever" as in "I ever been to Spain".

 

Who cares if the Thai word "koy" is misspelled? I know many so called Thai speakers who think this word means "have" or "used to", as in "I have been there", "I have eaten it before". 

There was even a poster here years ago called, "ajarn", who had been learning Thai for many years didn't know this Thai word meaning "not very".

 

But go ahead all you people living in Thailand, who can't communicate in Thai, and criticize the Thais ability at speaking English as after all they should, shouldn't they?

"The only mistake I often heard was that they used "ever" as in "I ever been to Spain"."

 

Seems like an odd mistake for people that spoke "impeccable English"?

 

Back on topic - the inadequate teaching of the language is unfortunate (bearing in mind there are so many Brits and Americans living here that could be used to point out mistakes), but those that eventually need to use the English language can hopefully be understood - and learn as they spend time speaking the language.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, pookiki said:

All from Liverpool, right?

My wife (who is Thai) got her doctorate from the University of Missouri (where we met) and taught ESL in Wisconsin public schools for 20 years. She could never understand my friend Bob who is from somewhere east of Liverpool. Sorry, that's the best I can do. The geography of England is not my strong suit, never been there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, scorecard said:

 

It goes even further, my Thai granddaughter goes to a higher level bilingual school, Primary 6, and she speaks close to native speaker English, to some extent coming from long-term immersion from birth from listening to me speak English to both her Thai mother and father who also speak good English.

 

She's had good qualified English teachers in P1 thru to P6 and alsi on kinder. Her current P6 English teacher is a well qualified and professional farang for English construction, spelling, real conversation, etc.

 

Plus at her school the kids have English taught by a Thai teacher. The Thai teacher can speak some English, she listens to the Farang teaching and is supposed to take notes and copy the same lesson later the same day repeating / explaining everything in Thai language.

 

Granddaughter tells tell us again and again that the Thai teacher continuously tells the class that the farang is wrong and is crazy and his salary is a waste of money. 

 

The kids have to try to remember to say things as taught by the professional farang teacher when they speak to him, and say it in a different construction (which they all know is incorrect) if they are talking in English (which is not often at all) to the Thai teacher. 

 

And they have to remember all of the above when they have mid-term and end of term Exams; one for farang taught English and a separate exam for Thai taught English.

 

A few Thai parents (who speak very good English) have complained about all of this direct to the school head, they always get told in no uncertain terms that they are wrong.

 

Truth is that some of the overall time could be used to much better advantage.

 

A long way to go. 

Re. the emboldened part - is that true or an exaggeration??!

 

I ask as it seems a bit unbelievable, even for Thailand!

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Johnniey said:

 

Who cares if the Thai word "koy" is misspelled? I know many so called Thai speakers who think this word means "have" or "used to", as in "I have been there", "I have eaten it before". 

There was even a poster here years ago called, "ajarn", who had been learning Thai for many years didn't know this Thai word meaning "not very".

 

But go ahead all you people living in Thailand, who can't communicate in Thai, and criticize the Thais ability at speaking English as after all they should, shouldn't they?

Who cares? Presumably Thais studying at university who expect Thai text not to contain careless mistakes (even if that is a forlorn hope for text in English).

 

Also, the (presumably foreign) people living in Thailand, who, according to you, can't communicate in Thai, are not being paid to teach the Thai language at University level.

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...