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University teaching shows why Thais' command of English is so abysmal!


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3 hours ago, Charlie1 said:

I noticed that many Thais try to speak a not understandable "American English". They should be taught only by UK native speakers - the teachers, I mean.

Now that is one funny post. Thanks for the laugh.

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Charlie1 is obviously not educated well enough to understand an educated American speaking.  Not all Brits are like that thank goodness.  I would compare my language skills and in fact my educational background to his at any time.  I'm sure he'd be embarrassed by that comparison.  As President Elect Donald Trump would say: "Charlie1... you're fired!

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2 minutes ago, pookiki said:

What does your passport say?

British Citizen, But if anyone asks my nationality i invariable answer English, as does everyone I know who was born in England.

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3 hours ago, Charlie1 said:

I noticed that many Thais try to speak a not understandable "American English". They should be taught only by UK native speakers - the teachers, I mean.

Standard American English is the preferred EFL study in the Arab world, generally speaking, because they consider it easier to understand and more "neutral." Besides, language changes due to geopolitical changes in power. Originally standard English was in the north of England but the prestige dialect shifted to London once London became the center of power in little England. Now it's little England again, empire is gone, and your comment shows you don't know anything about linguistics.

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8 minutes ago, Khun Paul said:

Unfortunately that is true and even more amazing is that native English teachers are sidelined when it comes to exams, they rather have the Thai English version which most if not all are very badly set out and they also have many ,many mistakes. When questioned the stock answer, depends on what the examiner was thinking................Total B/S that is why after 10 years I stopped teaching , you can take a horse to water but you cannot make it drinkl, likewise Thai students you can teach them but you cannot make them learn and in todays educational culture in Thailand  everyone passes even the stupid ones.

You are so right.  Thai culture pre-supposes no failures, so serious teaching and exams are doomed.  There are always exceptions, and I'm sure we'll hear about them in here, but the reality is that Thailand is going the way of Scotland - if the results overall are not good enough - lower the pass-mark ;)

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8 minutes ago, jpinx said:

You are so right.  Thai culture pre-supposes no failures, so serious teaching and exams is doomed.  There are always exceptions, and I'me sure we'll hear about them in here, but the reality is that Thailand is going the way of Scotland - if the results overall are not good enough - lower the pass-mark ;)

My brother's wife is a teacher back home in California and exams are a no-no - they might lower the student's self-esteem if they realize that they're dumb. I understand from recent reading that parents in the UK are flocking to have their kids recognized as "dyslexic" because, let's face it, the little darlings couldn't possibly be thick

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4 hours ago, jpinx said:

There are so many versions of English (Spanish also) that it is hard to know where to set the standard, but there is no doubt that most Thai "English Teachers" are hard pressed to have a conversation in English with a native UK English speaker.

The only version I know is the "Queens English"

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Just now, SaintLouisBlues said:

My brother's wife is a teacher and exams are a no-no - they might lower the student's self-esteem if they realize that they're dumb. I understand from recent reading that parents in the UK are flocking to have their kids recognized as "dyslexic" because, let's face it, the little darlings couldn't possibly be thick

Hadn't heard about that one -- I'll pass it on to a few educators....  ;)

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20 minutes ago, GAZZPA said:

Please,,, if someone is born in England they are English, full stop.

 

England has ALWAYS been part of the United Kingdom and Great Britain is not the same. The United Kingdom is England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, all under the English monarchy. Great Britain is England, Scotland and Wales. 

 

Officially the United Kingdom is Great Britain plus Northern Ireland...

 

People in the UK are very clear on their identity and are proud of their respective countries. If you dont believe me go and call a Scotsman and Englishman and then say goodbye to your teeth.

 

Look, I am trying to explain the limitation of the question as it would apply to the UK.  Thais often refer to a person's nationality by using the same as the language spoken in the country.  In this instance, the question is ambiguous because 'English' is spoken throughout the United Kingdom.  I teach migrant workers from Myanmar. Invariably when I ask them what their 'nationality' is they will answer with 'Mon', 'Karen', Shan, etc.  If you want to refer to yourself as 'English', all well and good.  Just not something I haven't heard.  I think most of us understand the term 'British' to be someone is from England.

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24 minutes ago, GAZZPA said:

What? There are no versions of English. English is English. There are some slight differences on some words and some local slang but mostly it is purely accent, nothing more.

 

From what I observe thai people have a better grasp then the press would have you believe. Of course if you speak too fast then it can be a problem for some but generally its ok for basic things everyday.

 

However, neighbouring countries such as Singapore, Malaysia and particularly the Philippines are light years away with English language skills.

 

 

 

 

I can't stand Malaysian English. To me it's the most annoying in the world. And I taught there at a university. I married a local Chinese, but unlike most, she spoke well and did not allow herself that awful babble (which Paul Thoreaux termed "yammering." He was referring to Singapore English but there's not much difference at all.) Not only is the accent cringe-worthy but they use half the words incorrectly or simplify  the lexicon to the extent that it leads to fuzzy thinking on their part. For example " I sen' you to ahpo' means "I'll take you to the airport."

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1 minute ago, dotpoom said:

The only version I know is the "Queens English"

That's a bit old now, though can be loosely interpreted to be "Oxford English".  Having taught English and Spanish casually all over the world, it is amazing to see that - in desperation - schools will take on "Native English/Spanish Speakers" who I can not have a conversation with because of their accent and phraseology.

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57 minutes ago, naiharn said:

Rubbish. "Are you English" is perfectly correct, and sounds more natural than "Are you an Englander?"!

 

"Are you an Englander?" sounds like something a German might say!

 

Of course in Australia the correct usage is "Are you a Pom?"

 

I would argue that the correct translation is: Are you an English person?

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6 minutes ago, Dustdevil said:

I can't stand Malaysian English. to me it's the most annoying in the world. And I taught there at a university. I married a local Chinese, but unlike most, she spoke well and did not allow herself that awful babble (which Paul Thoreaux termed "yammering." He was referring to Singapore English but there's not much difference at all.) Not only is the accent cringe-worthy but they use half the words incorrectly or simplify  the lexicon to the extent that it leads to fuzzy thinking on their part. For example " I sen' you to ahpo' means "I'll take you to the airport."

The old British colonies like Malysia and Singapore have a version of English that was extant when they ceased being colonies, and they haven't really kept up. I hadn't heard "hanky-panky" used for decades until I was on a recent trip to Malaysia

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