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University teaching shows why Thais' command of English is so abysmal!


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Are you an English person?

Are you English?

Are you an Englishman?

Are you from England?

Are your heritage from England by any means?

Do you stem from England perhaps?

Is England the Country from where you come?

Is England you country of origin?

Are you from that little Island just North of Europe?

Is it from England that you come?

Did you come from England?

Do you count England as your place of origin?

 

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Just now, midasthailand said:

I would argue that the correct translation is: Are you an English person?

The unambiguous translation should be  "Are you from England?".

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Just now, SaintLouisBlues said:

The old British colonies like Malysia and Singapore have a version of English that was extant when they ceased being colonies, and they haven't really kept up. I hadn't heard "hanky-panky" used for decades until I was on a recent trip to Malaysia

....maybe you need to get out more ?  ;)

 

...joking.....  :D

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2 hours ago, Johnniey said:

What is it a technical/vocational college?

I worked in a Thai university for over 10 years and all the teachers in the English department spoke impeccable English as many of them had PhD's from English universities. They had all studied to a Master's degree level abroad. 

 

The only mistake I often heard was that they used "ever" as in "I ever been to Spain".

 

Who cares if the Thai word "koy" is misspelled? I know many so called Thai speakers who think this word means "have" or "used to", as in "I have been there", "I have eaten it before". 

There was even a poster here years ago called, "ajarn", who had been learning Thai for many years didn't know this Thai word meaning "not very".

 

But go ahead all you people living in Thailand, who can't communicate in Thai, and criticize the Thais ability at speaking English as after all they should, shouldn't they?

Ello ello ello, the Thai-bashing policeman has arrived at last.

 

It's not the point that most of us farang living in Thailand can't speak Thai. We're critisising because people are paying good money to Thai university professors, with high qualifications, teaching incorrect English. 

If I wanted to learn to speak Thai, which I don't, I'd expect my teacher to be competent in the language.

 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Dustdevil said:

Standard American English is the preferred EFL study in the Arab world, generally speaking, because they consider it easier to understand and more "neutral." Besides, language changes due to geopolitical changes in power. Originally standard English was in the north of England but the prestige dialect shifted to London once London became the center of power in little England. Now it's little England again, empire is gone, and your comment shows you don't know anything about linguistics.

American English makes sense as they are the current global power.

 

FWIW, I was taken by suprise when meeting a Thai who spoke perfect American English!  I later found out that he was schooled in the US.  Not a problem at all as most Brits and Americans can understand each other.

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6 minutes ago, phantomfiddler said:

The Thais should be taught by teachers from the West Country where, as everyone knows, the present tense of the verb "To be" is "I is, We be, and They am ( often abbreviated to They,m). Let,s get a bit of culture going here :)

Yes but how do they handle irregular declensions? You know -

My girlfriend is an entertainer; your girlfriend is a dancer in a bar, his girlfriend is a prostitute?

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10 minutes ago, Colabamumbai said:

Half of the school books in Thailand that have English phrases have incorrect English.

Which is particularly depressing as there are so many native English speaking people here :sad:.

 

It really shouldn't be that hard to check with someone who actually speaks English.

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2 hours ago, Johnniey said:

What is it a technical/vocational college?

I worked in a Thai university for over 10 years and all the teachers in the English department spoke impeccable English as many of them had PhD's from English universities. They had all studied to a Master's degree level abroad. 

 

The only mistake I often heard was that they used "ever" as in "I ever been to Spain".

 

Who cares if the Thai word "koy" is misspelled? I know many so called Thai speakers who think this word means "have" or "used to", as in "I have been there", "I have eaten it before". 

There was even a poster here years ago called, "ajarn", who had been learning Thai for many years didn't know this Thai word meaning "not very".

 

But go ahead all you people living in Thailand, who can't communicate in Thai, and criticize the Thais ability at speaking English as after all they should, shouldn't they?

But go ahead all you people living in Thailand, who can't communicate in Thai, and criticize the Thais ability at speaking English as after all they should, shouldn't they?

 

They should if they are teaching it. Or do you really believe a person teaching a subject has no need to understand what he or she is teaching?

 

Communicate in Thai where? A school, the market, a hotel? I have noticed so many times the Thai "Euh" amongst Thai people talking but are they confused by slang, accent or just being too lazy to listen?

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5 minutes ago, midasthailand said:

For that to be the translation then the question would need to be:  Khun ma jaak prathet Angkrit Chai mai?

OK, let's say I accept your translation.  So does the original question refer to a person's nationality or ethnicity?

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5 minutes ago, Gillyflower said:

Well as long as they don't say, as so many people on TV write.....would of....could of.....should of.  It is would HAVE, should HAVE etc.  There is an Admin who could take notice of that.

I doubt that the moderators care to be 'grammar police'.  Similarly most posters aren't very bothered either - as long as they understand the point being made.

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3 minutes ago, pookiki said:

OK, let's say I accept your translation.  So does the original question refer to a person's nationality or ethnicity?

Nationality for me. If asked where I come from, I reply Australia, which implies I am Australian regardless of my ethnicity. If asked where I was born, I would reply England, which makes me English by birth also regardless of my ethnicity.

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