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eldragon

What's the most hospitable thing a Thai has done for you?

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During my second trip to Thailand, in 2001, I visited Khon Kaen.  My home town is New York City, where I used public transportation almost all the time.  So when I was leaving a shopping center in Khon Kaen, and the tuk-tuk drivers quoted me ridiculous prices to return to my hotel, I decided to ride a public songtaew. How hard could it be, I’m a New Yorker, I’m city-savvy, right? ...heh...

 

This was of course before the days of mobile phones and data networks, so I pulled out my map and tried to read the street signs, to know where I was and when to get off.  I soon realized I had no idea where I was or if I was even on the right songtaew.

 

The other passengers sensed my distress, and a young couple who were disembarking motioned for me to go with them. Although I was a little apprehensive, I decided that I was better off accepting their offer than not. We got off, and the woman motioned for me to stay by the street with her husband while she went into her house for something.

 

She emerged with two motorcycle helmets, and I figured out that the husband was going to bring me to my hotel. It was about a ten minute ride. I pulled out my wallet to give him my card so we could stay in touch. He thought I was going to give him money and motioned his refusal.

 

This hospitality deeply moved me, and I have tried to model that ever since. About a year later I was in a Korean supermarket in Silver Spring, Maryland (in the USA), and an elderly woman was speaking with distress to a store employee. With my minimal Korean language skills I figured out that she had no ride home. Remembering the Khon Kaen event, I realized that it was time to give back. I drove her home, a 20 minute drive each way. She tried to give me money but of course I refused.

 

To this day I am moved by acts of kindness given me by Thai people. Of course, there are bad people too, as there are everywhere, but it’s important to realize that we naturally tend to magnify in our minds the negative experiences. We need to compensate for that negative bias by reminding ourselves that it is a bias and that the statistical reality is not nearly as bad. For every reckless driver, for example, there are a hundred who carefully and gingerly proceed from a traffic light allowing motorbikers like me to pass safely.

 

A single act of kindness is multiplied in this way.  Negative actions are multiplied as well. May we all remember this when we deal with strangers, friends, and loved ones – and when we post on ThaiVisa.
 

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THAI HOSPITALITY UNKNOWN TO ME ,lived here for 42 years and have never been invited for a drink or a dinner to a thai persons home ,THAI HOSPITALITY UNKNOWN TO THAI PEOPLE FOR SURE.

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car got stuck in the mud in the country side, got lost and tried to u-turn by going into a unpaved road, wasn't aware of how wet the ground was, car was able to go forward, but when I tried to do  a u-turn at the end of the road, car got stuck. 5-6 guys from the village came to help, took 5 hours to get my car out of the mud. They told me to stay in the car so I won't get muddy :-) They were all covered in mud, I offered to give them 500 baht each for their effort. They all decline the money, but I insisted anyways.

 

Merry Christmas everyone

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13 minutes ago, diehard71 said:

THAI HOSPITALITY UNKNOWN TO ME ,lived here for 42 years and have never been invited for a drink or a dinner to a thai persons home ,THAI HOSPITALITY UNKNOWN TO THAI PEOPLE FOR SURE.

Do you have a GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR attitude....?

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I AM THE ONE THAT HAS HOSPITALITY AND I AM NOT THAI,I HAVE THAI FRIENDS AND NEIGHBOURS AT MY PLACE EVERY NIGHT EATING AND DRINKING FREE OF CHARGE,NOT DRINKING WATER BUT BEER AND WHISKY .BEEN GOING ON FOR OVER 40 YEARS ,AND NO I DO NOT HAVE A GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR ATTITUDE.BY THE WAY NONE OF THEM EVER INVITED ME OVER TO THEIR PLACE.

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There are always small incidents of kindness... This one stands out from a few months ago. 

 

I was buying fruit at a roadside vendor and a samlor pulled up with a very dusty older lady inside. She asked about the cantaloupe and for 20 baht, it was too expensive for her and she declined. So, I bought the cantaloupe for her. 

 

The samlor driver, who was surely quite poor as well, looked at me with so much gratitude. He told me that if he ever saw me walking anywhere in town, he would take me wherever I wanted to go for free. 

 

I think in Thailand, as maybe near everyplace, if you act kindly, kindness comes back to you. 

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I installed a new brake lever on my Kawasaki. Unbeknownst to me it was activating itself randomly. I came off doing a U turn and the bike damaged my leg. I parked outside a hotel in Phuket and was sitting on the ground trying to deal with my leg. A lady came out of the hotel and told me to come inside. While I sat inside and drank the water they gave me, somebody appeared with a First Aid Kit and proceeded to clean my leg and bandage it for me. I was immensely grateful and offered money, but they would take nothing. I have had other experiences here. In my book Thai's are an extremely kind caring people. Your experience may vary.

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53 minutes ago, Keith Bennett said:

During my second trip to Thailand, in 2001, I visited Khon Kaen.  My home town is New York City, where I used public transportation almost all the time.  So when I was leaving a shopping center in Khon Kaen, and the tuk-tuk drivers quoted me ridiculous prices to return to my hotel, I decided to ride a public songtaew. How hard could it be, I’m a New Yorker, I’m city-savvy, right? ...heh...

 

This was of course before the days of mobile phones and data networks, so I pulled out my map and tried to read the street signs, to know where I was and when to get off.  I soon realized I had no idea where I was or if I was even on the right songtaew.

 

The other passengers sensed my distress, and a young couple who were disembarking motioned for me to go with them. Although I was a little apprehensive, I decided that I was better off accepting their offer than not. We got off, and the woman motioned for me to stay by the street with her husband while she went into her house for something.

 

She emerged with two motorcycle helmets, and I figured out that the husband was going to bring me to my hotel. It was about a ten minute ride. I pulled out my wallet to give him my card so we could stay in touch. He thought I was going to give him money and motioned his refusal.

 

This hospitality deeply moved me, and I have tried to model that ever since. About a year later I was in a Korean supermarket in Silver Spring, Maryland (in the USA), and an elderly woman was speaking with distress to a store employee. With my minimal Korean language skills I figured out that she had no ride home. Remembering the Khon Kaen event, I realized that it was time to give back. I drove her home, a 20 minute drive each way. She tried to give me money but of course I refused.

 

To this day I am moved by acts of kindness given me by Thai people. Of course, there are bad people too, as there are everywhere, but it’s important to realize that we naturally tend to magnify in our minds the negative experiences. We need to compensate for that negative bias by reminding ourselves that it is a bias and that the statistical reality is not nearly as bad. For every reckless driver, for example, there are a hundred who carefully and gingerly proceed from a traffic light allowing motorbikers like me to pass safely.

 

A single act of kindness is multiplied in this way.  Negative actions are multiplied as well. May we all remember this when we deal with strangers, friends, and loved ones – and when we post on ThaiVisa.
 

Great post. Nice to read at Christmas, especially about the children.

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11 minutes ago, diehard71 said:

I AM THE ONE THAT HAS HOSPITALITY AND I AM NOT THAI,I HAVE THAI FRIENDS AND NEIGHBOURS AT MY PLACE EVERY NIGHT EATING AND DRINKING FREE OF CHARGE,NOT DRINKING WATER BUT BEER AND WHISKY .BEEN GOING ON FOR OVER 40 YEARS ,AND NO I DO NOT HAVE A GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR ATTITUDE.BY THE WAY NONE OF THEM EVER INVITED ME OVER TO THEIR PLACE.

OK MATE. SOUNDS LIKE YOU ENJOY GETTING TAKEN FOR A RIDE BUT NO NEED TO SHOUT AT US, EH?

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Well being a Thai mine was to let my lovley boyfriend become my lovley husband. He is now part of my Family who just love him.( No he not give money to them him don'tneed to we look after each other).

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If Thai folk "read" you are OK you will not have a problem and they will do stuff....Many years here have shown me that...

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On 22/12/2016 at 2:06 AM, Laughing Gravy said:

They leave me alone to get on with my business as I do theirs. Very Hospitable.

Much more hospitable than Charlie Hall. Poor little Laughing Gravy!

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In reality, there have been so many over the years, it would be hard to single one out.

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16 minutes ago, transam said:

If Thai folk "read" you are OK you will not have a problem and they will do stuff....Many years here have shown me that...

I think this sums it up perfectly. I've always thought they had good intuitions even without speaking the same language. You show respect here and its generally paid back in spades. 

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2 minutes ago, DDBKK said:

I think this sums it up perfectly. I've always thought they had good intuitions even without speaking the same language. You show respect here and its generally paid back in spades. 

Trust me on that.....

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