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eldragon

What's the most hospitable thing a Thai has done for you?

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32 minutes ago, Mansell said:

I installed a new brake lever on my Kawasaki. Unbeknownst to me it was activating itself randomly. I came off doing a U turn and the bike damaged my leg. I parked outside a hotel in Phuket and was sitting on the ground trying to deal with my leg. A lady came out of the hotel and told me to come inside. While I sat inside and drank the water they gave me, somebody appeared with a First Aid Kit and proceeded to clean my leg and bandage it for me. I was immensely grateful and offered money, but they would take nothing. I have had other experiences here. In my book Thai's are an extremely kind caring people. Your experience may vary.

Not all, but certainly many.  And I live on Phuket!

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Around 10 years or so ago, I was doing one of my many visa runs ( border runs ) again, in my very old Honda Accord. Just up north from Kura Buri, I blew up the engine and steam was coming out everywhere. I drove off the road and 'landed' kind-a in a yard in front of a Thai house, after the first seconds of confusion and serious looks of the family, I explained in a few basic Thai words what happened (as far as I could tell ) and was right away taken in the family, offered food and drinks, hanging around with them chatting, while one of the neighbors tried to fix things ( to no avail ofcourse ) then I used their phone to call someone up to help me out and when I left early afternoon they insisted I take some fruits with me and had to promise to come back and visit them some time. Very welcoming people ( outside of the tourists traps ! ) and hospitable like you don't see in Europe anymore.

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1 hour ago, Keith Bennett said:

During my second trip to Thailand, in 2001, I visited Khon Kaen.  My home town is New York City, where I used public transportation almost all the time.  So when I was leaving a shopping center in Khon Kaen, and the tuk-tuk drivers quoted me ridiculous prices to return to my hotel, I decided to ride a public songtaew. How hard could it be, I’m a New Yorker, I’m city-savvy, right? ...heh...

 

This was of course before the days of mobile phones and data networks, so I pulled out my map and tried to read the street signs, to know where I was and when to get off.  I soon realized I had no idea where I was or if I was even on the right songtaew.

 

The other passengers sensed my distress, and a young couple who were disembarking motioned for me to go with them. Although I was a little apprehensive, I decided that I was better off accepting their offer than not. We got off, and the woman motioned for me to stay by the street with her husband while she went into her house for something.

 

She emerged with two motorcycle helmets, and I figured out that the husband was going to bring me to my hotel. It was about a ten minute ride. I pulled out my wallet to give him my card so we could stay in touch. He thought I was going to give him money and motioned his refusal.

 

This hospitality deeply moved me, and I have tried to model that ever since. About a year later I was in a Korean supermarket in Silver Spring, Maryland (in the USA), and an elderly woman was speaking with distress to a store employee. With my minimal Korean language skills I figured out that she had no ride home. Remembering the Khon Kaen event, I realized that it was time to give back. I drove her home, a 20 minute drive each way. She tried to give me money but of course I refused.

 

To this day I am moved by acts of kindness given me by Thai people. Of course, there are bad people too, as there are everywhere, but it’s important to realize that we naturally tend to magnify in our minds the negative experiences. We need to compensate for that negative bias by reminding ourselves that it is a bias and that the statistical reality is not nearly as bad. For every reckless driver, for example, there are a hundred who carefully and gingerly proceed from a traffic light allowing motorbikers like me to pass safely.

 

A single act of kindness is multiplied in this way.  Negative actions are multiplied as well. May we all remember this when we deal with strangers, friends, and loved ones – and when we post on ThaiVisa.
 

Re. the emboldened part - if you were a young, Western female who was subsequently raped - you'd then be blamed for showing poor judgment....

 

But other than that I agree with your post entirely.

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For me the most hospitable thing was my girlfriend parents invited me to stay in their home for a year before we got married

That was very nice of them 

 

 

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1 minute ago, dick dasterdly said:

Re. the emboldened part - if you were a young, Western female who was subsequently raped - you'd then be blamed for showing poor judgment....

 

But other than that I agree with your post entirely.

Bad stuff is anywhere on our planet...

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12 minutes ago, DDBKK said:

I think this sums it up perfectly. I've always thought they had good intuitions even without speaking the same language. You show respect here and its generally paid back in spades. 

Frequently, but not always.

 

Earlier I posted a few examples of the great kindness shown by complete strangers, but I also have the odd example of people that know me - that have had no compunction in 'stealing' from me, in the sense of not paying back money.

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On 19/12/2016 at 8:07 PM, Kwasaki said:

post-87530-0-69743200-1461032786.jpg

I don't understand this photo here, only thing I know is it could be bondage sex games I guess. Are thais  into this as well? Oh, they have come a long way then.

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8 minutes ago, dick dasterdly said:

Re. the emboldened part - if you were a young, Western female who was subsequently raped - you'd then be blamed for showing poor judgment....

 

But other than that I agree with your post entirely.

 

6 minutes ago, transam said:

Bad stuff is anywhere on our planet...

I was trying to point out the difference in attitude between someone doing something of which they were a 'bit wary' - but their hesitancies left them embarrassed, compared to the odd Western female who does the same thing and is raped.  And then many posters declare it was her fault for being so stupid....

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On 21/12/2016 at 6:51 AM, theguyfromanotherforum said:

It's a 3rd year I'm living free in my wife's house. Never asked me a penny, even for the electric. I'd say that's pretty damn hospitable.

Isn't that called "Freeloading" ?

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During my second trip to Thailand, in 2001, I visited Khon Kaen.  My home town is New York City, where I used public transportation almost all the time.  So when I was leaving a shopping center in Khon Kaen, and the tuk-tuk drivers quoted me ridiculous prices to return to my hotel, I decided to ride a public songtaew. How hard could it be, I’m a New Yorker, I’m city-savvy, right? ...heh...
 
This was of course before the days of mobile phones and data networks, so I pulled out my map and tried to read the street signs, to know where I was and when to get off.  I soon realized I had no idea where I was or if I was even on the right songtaew.
 
The other passengers sensed my distress, and a young couple who were disembarking motioned for me to go with them. Although I was a little apprehensive, I decided that I was better off accepting their offer than not. We got off, and the woman motioned for me to stay by the street with her husband while she went into her house for something.
 
She emerged with two motorcycle helmets, and I figured out that the husband was going to bring me to my hotel. It was about a ten minute ride. I pulled out my wallet to give him my card so we could stay in touch. He thought I was going to give him money and motioned his refusal.
 
This hospitality deeply moved me, and I have tried to model that ever since. About a year later I was in a Korean supermarket in Silver Spring, Maryland (in the USA), and an elderly woman was speaking with distress to a store employee. With my minimal Korean language skills I figured out that she had no ride home. Remembering the Khon Kaen event, I realized that it was time to give back. I drove her home, a 20 minute drive each way. She tried to give me money but of course I refused.
 
To this day I am moved by acts of kindness given me by Thai people. Of course, there are bad people too, as there are everywhere, but it’s important to realize that we naturally tend to magnify in our minds the negative experiences. We need to compensate for that negative bias by reminding ourselves that it is a bias and that the statistical reality is not nearly as bad. For every reckless driver, for example, there are a hundred who carefully and gingerly proceed from a traffic light allowing motorbikers like me to pass safely.
 
A single act of kindness is multiplied in this way.  Negative actions are multiplied as well. May we all remember this when we deal with strangers, friends, and loved ones – and when we post on ThaiVisa.
 

Thanks Dad!
Words of wisdom. All that's missing is "I'm a born again Christian part".

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31 minutes ago, dick dasterdly said:

Frequently, but not always.

 

Earlier I posted a few examples of the great kindness shown by complete strangers, but I also have the odd example of people that know me - that have had no compunction in 'stealing' from me, in the sense of not paying back money.

Are you talking about farang or thai? I've experienced it with one farang and that marked 2 things. 1 - the end of the friendship. Cheap price to pay IMO. 2 - ill never loan again to anyone outside my immediate family, who are hard working middle class Thais. Should they ever need it.

 

I've known extended thai family members to take the Piss with borrowing from my thai sister-in-law because she's jai dii. Some paid the money back, others didn't. But the one who didn't are no longer close to the family or business practices. 

 

Fool me once etc etc

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16 minutes ago, DDBKK said:

Are you talking aboudiateng or thai? I've experienced  it with one farang and that marked 2 things. 1 - the end of the friendship. Cheap price to pay IMO. 2 - ill never loan again to anyone outside my immediate family, who are hard working middle class Thais. Should they ever need it.

 

I've known extended thai family members to take the Piss with borrowing from my thai sister-in-law because she's jai dii. Some paid the money back, others didn't. But the one who didn't are no longer close to the family or business practices. 

 

Fool me once etc etc

I very much agree. We never lend money outside of immediate Family Not even to another farang been bitten once never again

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i had the pleasure of meeting one of the best blokes ever, yes a thai, after being kicked out of my house by my ex. by accident i wondered into a restaurant in bangkapi and met the owner a very generous man, he had 6 apartments and said i could live in one for cost of electric and water, has 250 acres in changrai and said i can pick anywhere on his land and build a house if needs be and have the use of a car when i visit, he has 8 cars' also witnessed him buy dinner for all the night staff working in the hotel across the road from his restaurant and hire the karaoke room for them when they knocked off. i was welcomed by his friends and there was always a place at their table for me at no expense. the bar in his place is serve yourself and count the bottles at the end of the night, as his staff said he has a big heart and restored my faith in some thai people. ps he also said if i build a house its his when i die 555.

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During the floods in Hatyai a few years back; my wife and I had gone walk-about through the flooded streets--you know, just looking around, seeing the flood. During that time the city water trucks came through delivering water. My neighbors made sure the trucks left water for us too. Well, it was raining, and although the city water was off, my wife-- being the good ole country girl she is--was catching water in all sorts of containers. So, we were able to return the favor. Soon the neighbors ran out of water and we were able to give them water and showed them-thar city-folk a new trick.

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