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webfact

20 percent of critically-ill patients in Thailand die in ambulances while being rushed to hospitals

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while traffic congestions sure have a big part in it...

there is plenty horror stories about those critically ill get some help to heaven by the very ones should care for them in the ambulance,  valuables missing.

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Here in Chiang Mai, we have traffic lights actually creating the traffic jams. You get red light for like e.g. 4-5 minutes and then green light for 15 seconds, if you are lucky.

 

Every time I sit and wait at the red light, I wonder if there might also be some high-end police boss who is also sitting there in his car and maybe thinking... "I could make this smarter and will send a person out to fix this..." (would require a minimum of brain-activity and effort)

 

But so far I guess no Police Boss seem to have figured it out yet. So we all just sit there happily waiting, while the traffic jam builds up... I guess the waiting is overwhelmed by the great feeling of pure joy and excitement, when being 1 of the 3 cars allowed to cross the road, when the green light finally turns on.

 

Not sure if this could save lives.. Might need a large committee set up and some expert statements to figure that out.

 

 

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2 hours ago, thedemon said:

 

 

I was wondering why they drove a critically ill patient past at least half a dozen hospitals.

 

Because they bring the patients to the hospital which pays the biggest commission. 2 years ago I had a motorbike accident in CM. Instead of bringing me to a government hospital 200m down the road, they first drove me home to pick up my insurance details and then to a private hospital. The hospital charged for cleaning the wounds, some plaster, pain killers, bandages and a 30 second visit from one of their doctors in the ER 4500 Baht. The ambulance drivers only left after they were paid for the "delivery" of me.

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2 hours ago, Enoon said:

 

Seems that I was mistaken. 

 

I thought that they sat there immobilised by obliviousness, indecision, selfishness or stupidity.

 

While the patient in the ambulance died, and the voices in the heads of those of us that have witnessed it screamed "MOVE you stupid ****!!"

 

 

 

Those voices were not in your head only, BKK ambulances really have a speakersystem so they can yell to other drivers by them.

 

I see it often, it doesn't help much though. They have no idea what to do when they hear an ambulance coming, not strange if you only get 5 hours of drivinglessons to get a license.

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2 hours ago, overherebc said:

 

Possibly heading for a patient pick up or if one inside to a hospital with specialist equipment for the patient.

Or the one offering the highest kickback 

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Seen it so many times, last time yesterday (no traffic jam though): ambulances being blocked by cars, pick-ups, (concrete) trucks, once even a huge Tesco semi. Not going to the side, nearly never, even accelerating to plug the space the ambulance could have worked itself in, oooh, it makes me sooo mad to see it, repeated time after time! When I hear/see an ambulance coming in my back, I go to the side a.s.a.p., period, ...but I'm not Thai. And whether male or female, young or old doesn't change a thing: most will block, or 'race' against, the ambulance... Oh, and I go to the side too when I see an ambulance coming in the opposite direction, was it only to allow it to 'pass through' in the middle of the road, that no Thai ever seemed to understand, the only few I saw doing that were... some maligned Farangs! And, cherry on the cake, when I am slowing down, or already standing still, it's seldom I see a Thai doing the same, mostly the morons(!) will hurry just to get in front of me, ...and block the ambulance. Deep sigh! Is that part of 'Thainess' too? Despicable, and criminal, it is by all means!

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And those poor devils who die in the ambulance, ie were not killed at the scene, don't count in the figures of those killed in accidents.  So the New Year / Songkran figures are higher than you are told.

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“…delayed by traffic congestion or by motorists who unintentionally or unknowingly blocked the ambulances, resulting in the deaths of 20 percent of the patients.

Just another example of traffic laws not being enforced. Hit those who interfere with ambulances with a 50,000 baht fine and make it stick. Soon you will see every vehicle scrambling out of the way.

 

Ha, Ha....Only kidding. TIT. Ain't never gonna happen. No way. Walk, run, drive at your own peril and pray that this isn't your unlucky day. 

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20 per cent of emergency patient deaths blamed on traffic jam delays
By The Nation

 

fad1c68021a6e9374b6fe2f5e5889504.jpeg

 

BANGKOK: -- MORE THAN 20 per cent of patients needing emergency treatment have died on their way to hospital because of delays due to traffic jams and uncooperative motorists, National Institute of Emergency Medicine (NIEM) secretary-general Anucha Setthasathian said.

 

Anucha revealed the startling statistic yesterday after a video clip went viral showing a pickup obstructing an ambulance on an emergency call. The incident reportedly took place in Chiang Mai on Sunday. 

 

Instead of giving way to the ambulance, the clip showed the pickup driver being angry that the ambulance overtook. He then sped up to catch the ambulance and complain. 

 

Full story: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30304268

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-01-17

 

 

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If Thai drivers were  ever taught the rules of driving & police enforced  the laws &.., society took the attitude of obeying rules of the road.,. I think this country would not have this problem

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There appears to be competition [baht] between the Toyota pickup rescue teams, who seem to be highly territorial with a gang mentality, and hospital ambulances. Ask somebody local that is well-connected and you are likely to learn that the pickup cowboys have been known to harvest body parts enroute to emergency rooms. So long as this kind of corruption is allowed to persist, what is the likelihood of improvement in legitimate ambulance practices?

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