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hydro/aquaponic gardening

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THanks Mate, could you tell me so what do you use to cover ?
I still haven't made up my mind. Polycarbonate or that white insect screen cloth.

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Hi, there, i would like to start a small hydroponic farm for myself. Could you tell me what do you think about the iStack or StarStack hydroponic planting set ? Is it reliable, efficient and interesting financially ? Would you recommend it ?

 

Thanks for your advices !

 

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On 23/01/2018 at 12:52 PM, drtreelove said:

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30336919

 

Sorry Hydoponics growers: grow for appearance and sellability, but don't expect food quality.  

Unfortunately that link has no real info, just mention of 'contaminated by chemical', if they are referring to pesticides, then it is a real concern. However I think they are referring to the chemical fertilizers, which is very different. 

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On 2/20/2018 at 7:56 PM, Olive073 said:

Hi, there, i would like to start a small hydroponic farm for myself. Could you tell me what do you think about the iStack or StarStack hydroponic planting set ? Is it reliable, efficient and interesting financially ? Would you recommend it ?

 

Thanks for your advices !

 

images.jpg.c6d717ecfb9f163004740dd4a1f0bd4d.jpg

I'm interested too to know more about these systems. Anybody use it ?

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On 2/19/2018 at 4:02 PM, gamesgplayemail said:

Hello, can you tell me what kind of vegetables you CANNOT grow hydroponics ?

And why people ,mostly seem to grow salad ?

Thank you.

"The newer high-tech solutions, such as hydroponics, or even newer, aeroponics, rate a careful examination. Can we count on them to rescue agriculture? Not if the goal is to feed the world's people and animals. They are fine for growing some pretty tomatoes to sell at the supermarket, or some nice lettuce in the basement, but these "new and modern" systems have a number of basic problems, some of them insurmountable if the goals are sustainability and nutrient-dense food. The most obvious failing is that they are energy-hungry. They use pumps and fans and often lights. In the interests of self-sufficiency, where is that energy to come from?" 

"There are other not so obvious problems with hydroponics. Any time one has a liquid-based growing solution they need water-soluble fertilizers, and these must be pure. One does not put compost in the hydroponic trays. This makes all natural organic hydroponics pretty difficult. Another drawback is that only certain crops are suitable, mostly the ones you have seen in the stores so far: lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, and some herbs. One will not raise a field of potatoes, cassava, or turnips hydroponically, nor thousands of acres of grains and legumes. One will not grow hay to feed animals hydroponically or aeroponically.

The most serious downside to these systems, though, is the lack of nutritional completeness in the produce. Designer vegetables grown in nutrient solutions are grown for looks, not nutrition."

"The high-tech systems above are things to learn from and we will and have gained knowledge from them. One valuable contribution is that we know more about what mineral nutrients are absolutely essential for plant growth. These systems, however, are not suitable for feeding your family and community, and they will not form the basis of the New Agriculture.

The place to grow a food crop is in the earth, in nutrient rich, biologically active soil, not in metered nutrient solutions..."

Michael Astera The Ideal Soil

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'The place to grow a food crop is in the earth, in nutrient rich, biologically active soil, not in metered nutrient solutions..."

Michael Astera The Ideal Soil'.

I think your quotes and general tone are about sustainable food production, not small consumer food production.

Food crops grown in soil, without the protection of enclosed greenhouses, probably have to be sprayed with chemicals to combat the myriad of bugs that wish to eat the crop. Maybe you don't need pesticides with aquaponics or hydroponics?

With the good soil, you also need fertilisers specific for that crop. Just check out all the bags of fertiliser in the back of pickups before the rice growing season.

Chemists analyse the requirements for certain crops (or are they called agronimists?). I see no

reason why you can't supply the required nutrients to a hydroponic or aquaponics system. What is the reason?

For me (at page 2 of 10000 pages of Aquaponics 101) I want to eat fresh fish and fresh vegetables. For me, aquaponics (automated with aurdino) is the way to go. [emoji3]

Ohhh and I forgot, doesn't the hydrogen in the growth beds bred bacteria? So isn't a growth bed biological active?

 

It seems to me the drawback with aquaponics ( there must be as many projects fail), is getting the system balanced. I think that's where the microprocessor steps in.

 

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Mine is just an opinion. I like soil, and the potential it has for growing nutrient dense food that tastes good and makes me feel good when I eat it and keeps me healthy.  If I wanted to grow food that looked good and was marketable for a commercial operation, and I wasn't going to eat myself or feed to my family, then I might be more interested in artificial systems without real soil.  
 
By the way, with mineral balanced and biologically active soil, plants resist pests and diseases, so conventional hard chemistry pesticides are not necessary.  And there are hard chemistry pesticides that get all the press and paranoia (for good reasons) , and then there are soft pesticides (bio-pesticides, botanicals, biological controls and other IPM tools that are organic program compatible and not harmful to people and the environment).  Unfortunately even a lot of organic growers don't know much about  modern state of the art, bio-rational pest and disease management,  IPM methods and materials. 
Mine is a novice opinion too. So in my case if I want fish and vegetables, it would be better to have plants in the soil and a separate fish tank filter system.
If I grow plants in the soil, wouldn't they need shade cloth overhead and fences around to stop the grasshoppers and caterpillars?
So I could grow the vegetables in the soil in a green house, and have a separate lot of fish tanks.
Trouble is when we go away travelling.
If I get my aquaponics automated correctly, we should be able to travel and leave nearly everything on remote, like the swimming pool.
Bit disappointed that the aquaponics vegetables will be less tasty than the in ground veggies.

I will have to think about this a little longer.
I like the idea of good tasting veggies.

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On 3/5/2018 at 10:28 AM, drtreelove said:

Mine is just an opinion. I like soil, and the potential it has for growing nutrient dense food that tastes good and makes me feel good when I eat it and keeps me healthy.  If I wanted to grow food that looked good and was marketable for a commercial operation, and I wasn't going to eat myself or feed to my family, then I might be more interested in artificial systems without real soil.  

 

By the way, with mineral balanced and biologically active soil, plants resist pests and diseases, so conventional hard chemistry pesticides are not necessary.  And there are hard chemistry pesticides that get all the press and paranoia (for good reasons) , and then there are soft pesticides (bio-pesticides, botanicals, biological controls and other IPM tools that are organic program compatible and not harmful to people and the environment).  Unfortunately even a lot of organic growers don't know much about  modern state of the art, bio-rational pest and disease management,  IPM methods and materials. 

 

Sorry, but if it was so easy, why ALL farmers would use dangerous pesticides ?

 

 

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5 hours ago, carlyai said:

Mine is a novice opinion too. So in my case if I want fish and vegetables, it would be better to have plants in the soil and a separate fish tank filter system.
If I grow plants in the soil, wouldn't they need shade cloth overhead and fences around to stop the grasshoppers and caterpillars?
So I could grow the vegetables in the soil in a green house, and have a separate lot of fish tanks.
Trouble is when we go away travelling.
If I get my aquaponics automated correctly, we should be able to travel and leave nearly everything on remote, like the swimming pool.
Bit disappointed that the aquaponics vegetables will be less tasty than the in ground veggies.

I will have to think about this a little longer.
I like the idea of good tasting veggies.

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Sorry but who said that hydro vegs do not taste as good ?

 

 

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Sorry but who said that hydro vegs do not taste as good ?
 
 
DRTREELOVE said it in his/her post. I don't know.
Are you saying hydro vegs taste as good as soil vegs?

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Hi to all Gardeners..

 

I (Ger) have Family in Alkmaar (NL) and they grow since 30 years in their Greenhouses hydroponics.

If you want a dutch Tomato soup get a red plate and pour hot water in.

My wifey grows now 5 years aquaponics and they taste great, just feed you fish and crays right.. Then the taste comes even it takes a bit time to find the right mix for the food. 

Eat asparagus and you know (smell) it when you go for a pee, and so you can control the taste of your veggies.

 

5 years ago we started in our backyard a little training system for my wife and nephew. After 5 rebuilding and upgrades and about 10.000 EUR later both are almost fit for starting a commercial System.

I got an offer for a 6400 sqm Greenhouse in Indonesia incl cooling system and start first setups, correct them, start again and getting more and more the optimum out of a confined space.

 

The only Pa*n in the a** is to find proper liner. There was some found in Chatuchat market but this roll 100m was rolled more miles through the market than my car on the road. And so was the condition. The seller wanted not even reduce the price for that cra*.

 

Anyone has had recently the pleasure to buy some Liners in a non blistered condition. My largest grow beds will be 50 m long and 6.35 m wide.

I will be glad to hear where I have to go.

 

I put up some pictures from my backyard and a halfway sketch of our plans for 2020 when I slowly retire out of the Offshore.. 

 

Cheers for any info.. 

 

 

 

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