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BANGKOK 22 July 2019 18:36
BLee103

Registering US Marriage in Thailand

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My Thai wife and I married in the US a couple of years ago, and want to register our marriage in Thailand.  I read through the below topic from a few years ago, and it was quite helpful, but I have a few questions.

 

One post suggested it might be possible to start the process in the US, and I'm curious if anyone has tried, and if yes, what is that process?  I'd like to take the process as far as I can in the US before going to Thailand.  Since the next time I return to Thailand will be on a 90-day visa, I'm just wary of the whole process from the US embassy to the local Amphur dragging out.  Is there an alternative to the US embassy affidavit, and could I then use Rev.com (or any other suggestions) for the translation to Thai?  I'm wondering if something like that would work, and if anyone has followed a similar process.  And if yes, details would be greatly appreciated.

 

Lastly, does anyone have links with current requirements for the MFA stage, as well as the local Amphur?  I feel more anxious about requirements for the local Amphur than any other stage...

 

Thanks!

 

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Unless you live near a Thai consulate it will be more work if you do everything in the US. The process in Thailand is much more easier and after you get the affidavit from the US-embassy the translation agency can do the certification by the Thai foreign office for you and have it send to your house. Next is the registration at the amphur, which shouldn't be a problem.

 

The Thai MFA want to see the original marriage certificate, the affidavit from the embassy and a translation of the documents, do bring your passport also. The merely check that the signature from the US-embassy is the real thing and that the translation is correct.

Next you make a scan and copy of all these documents for future reference.

 

At the amphur you attend both (with ID and copies of these) and hand in the documents certified by the Thai MFA, so they will record the foreign marriage and you should receive a khor rhor 22 form from them. That proves you have registered the mariage abroad in Thailand.

 

Remeber that you can register your marriage at any amphur in Thailand. So choose one where they have dealt with this situation and if needed just go to another amphur.

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Hi Preacher, thanks so much for your response.  That's really helpful. 

 

I have a few more questions if you don't mind.

 

1. How long does the whole process typically take?

2. The US embassy affidavit asks for a local address.  I presume that I should ask the owner of our AirBNB to file a TM30 for us, right?  

3. Any insights into what the affidavit should say? Something like I, [full name] married [Full Name] on [Date] at [location]... is that about it?

4. I'm confused about whether I have go to the MFA.  Are there services that will send and retrieve from the MFA for me, or do I need to plan to go to the MFA?  What documents do we need to bring (translation, marriage cert, passport...is that all?)?

5. What documents do I need to take to the Amphur?

 

Thanks again!

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1. Not long, The whole process should not take longer than about 3 or 4 working days, from getting the affidavit to registering at the amphur.

 

2. Just fill in your address in Thailand. If you stay at an AirBnB the owner should indeed file a TM30, but that is for immigration.

 

3. It should identify you and your wife and clearly state that you are married, giving the date of the marriage, and where you got married, and state that you are still married to each other. For an example you could contact the US-embassy.

You sign in front of the consular officer

 

4. You have to get the affidavit translated. The translation agency normally can also take care of the MFA part.

 

5. ID-card/passport of both and affidavit and certified translation, household registration might be handy. You could check with the amphur before you go. If they are difficult you can just choose another amphur. You do not have to use the amphur for where you live.

 

 

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Preacher, thank you so much for your responses.  That's extremely helpful!  We head back to Thailand this summer and just wanting to get all our ducks in a row.  Thanks again!

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Just thought I'd follow up and close the loop in case this is helpful to anyone in the future. 

 

1. Went to the US embassy and certified my passport and an affidavit stating when and where we married. In retrospect, I should have included our marriage license number on the affidavit, as that was asked at the khet,but it didn't prevent us from getting it done. 

2. Took all certified documents, plus our marriage license to a translator. (Fyi, the embassy will not certify the marriage license, but you should get it translated). 

3. Had the translator send the translated documents to the Thai MFA, and then EMS to my condo. 

4. Went to the Khannayao Khet... We did this because we needed to change my wife's name. Had we not wanted to do that, I think we could have gone to any district office. 

 

It took almost 90 min to update the tabian baan. And then my wife got a new Thai ID. 

 

The whole process could be finished in a week. The issues we faced were 1) I didn't have the embassy certify my passport on my first visit, so had to return. And 2) should have included the marriage license number on the affidavit. And 3) we got caught up because the khet wanted an agreement signed by me and my wife that said she is allowed to use my name... Some embassies actually have a form for that, in which case the MFA would have to certify a translated copy of said agreement. The US embassy does not have that agreement, and the affidavit serves the purpose instead. The khet had an agreement in thai, which at both signed... And that was that. But we got turned around finding the answer as the khets requirement for this agreement was really unclear to us. 

 

In any case, it's all done now! Thanks for the help, preacher, and hope this helps others one day. 

  • Thanks 1

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This thread is so helpful.  But, of course my situation is slightly different so I have a question(or two).  I would like to check my assumptions against the vast aggregate experience of TV.

 

I'm not a US citizen but do hold a valid green card and currently reside in USA.  We are moving to Chiang Mai in March/April of '19.  We are also visiting Thailand from Jan. 8 - Jan. 31.  I would like to get a few things set up in Thailand on this visit including registering our marriage of 19 years, opening bank accounts, etc.

 

I assume that since our marriage was performed in USA and my wife is a US citizen we should go to the US Consulate in Chiang Mai for the required affidavit rather than the Canadian Consulate.

 

My step son owns the Chiang Mai home where we will be staying.  To assist in the marriage registration process, does he need to file a TM30 to show that I will be staying there for a couple of weeks on this trip?  Or can I just use that address during the marriage registration process?

 

 

 

 

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I am in this situation also, and I am confused about the affidavit.  The US Embassy has two affidavits - one is the Certificate of Marriage, where I certify that I am single, divorced or widowed (and provide dates if applicable).  How can I use this to declare that I am in fact NOT single?  The other affidavit is blank, where I can write anything at all.  Should I use the blank one?

 

A Thai lawyer keeps telling that I do not need this because I am already married and it makes no sense.  But the translator I contacted for the marriage certificate says I have to go.  SO I have an appointment for the Embassy, not sure what to ask for when I get there.

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Believe Emb paperwork may no longer be accepted and full legal process has to be done (but I may be wrong) - that would be State that issued would have to certify and then Department of State in Washington sign off and then present to Thai Consulate to sign off before translation and registration at MFA in Thailand and then at local District Office.  But I am not read up on the process so may be wrong; and hope I am.

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I don't think the US Embassy ever had an affidavit declaring one is married. The Amphur office told my wife they need an embassy letter, duly translated. As a backup I am writing a statement based on the Marriage Affidavit, to be attached to a blank affidavit. Hopefully with an Embassy signature and stamp the MFA will legalize it.

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On 6/26/2019 at 6:53 PM, BKKJohn said:

I don't think the US Embassy ever had an affidavit declaring one is married. The Amphur office told my wife they need an embassy letter, duly translated. As a backup I am writing a statement based on the Marriage Affidavit, to be attached to a blank affidavit. Hopefully with an Embassy signature and stamp the MFA will legalize it.

Did you ever get this sorted? We are at the stage of making an appointment at the US Embassy, but the Affidavit does not make sense. The only options are stating if I have been divorced, widowed, or am single. We are in fact legally married in the USA, so this entire question is one that is irrelevant. 

 

Do I simply fill out a blank affidavit that is not formatted stating that I am currently married to said Thai wife and want to register that marriage in Thailand? Surprisingly, I can find nothing online about this. And for that matter, the MFA does not have an answer for it.....they just keep answering "fill out the document."

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You do not do anything at US Embassy for a marriage in USA.  You have to get paperwork from state married in, and believe that has to go to Department of State in Washington and then to Thai Embassy in Washington and then translation and registration at District Office.  Suspect procedure is outlined on US Embassy Bangkok web site or can be searched on Google.

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