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grollies

Gardening Safety

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It's not just be creatures you can see you need to worry about ...

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Jai Dee said:

I thought we were talking about safety grollies? :whistling:

Spraying Chaindrite over 2 rai of garden is going to cost me a fortune.

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Just now, grollies said:

Spraying Chaindrite over 2 rai of garden is going to cost me a fortune.

 

Not particularly safe either :whistling:

 

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36 minutes ago, Crossy said:

It's not just be creatures you can see you need to worry about ...

 

 

Just read that thread Crossy. Piccys of that chap's toes is not nice. Reinforces good practice. Thanks for the link.

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5 minutes ago, grollies said:

Just read that thread Crossy. Piccys of that chaps does not nice. Reinforces good practice. Thanks for the link.

 

The scary thing is that, after I posted the saga on Facebore, a rather large number of my friends had, or knew someone who had, lost bits to Necrotising Fascitis.

 

It's rare, but not that rare.

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9 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

The scary thing is that, after I posted the saga on Facebore, a rather large number of my friends had, or knew someone who had, lost bits to Necrotising Fascitis.

 

It's rare, but not that rare.

......and I got a blister on my finger today from the shears...:sad: not popped yet though.....

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13 minutes ago, Crossy said:

 

The scary thing is that, after I posted the saga on Facebore, a rather large number of my friends had, or knew someone who had, lost bits to Necrotising Fascitis.

 

It's rare, but not that rare.

My fl lost two fingers the first of the year due to Necrotising Fascitis. Still does rehab for the other two fingers every week at the hospital. He is back to normal as he will get and mentally he has no problem.

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My recipe for all insect bites is to very quickly apply a pad soaked in standard 70% alcohol (surgical spirit) , and keep it held there for five minutes or even longer, rubbing gently. This seems to change the chemical structure of the venom (?) and the sting is considerably lessened, or often goes away completely. I have tried this with the small (almost transparent) scorpions, big black soldier ants, and most recently with a bee sting. All worked nicely! If you delay the alcohol treatment, the result is not as effective. The alcohol will also act as an antiseptic, so good to do anyway. Comments on this technique will be welcome.

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When I get stung take some tobacco and wet it then stick on the bite, kills the sting right away and usually doesnt swell or itch, old west trick and really works. I dont get the save the snakes people I just killed a large cobra outside my front door. There is no shortage of them, and i dont want him coming back or chance him biting me trying to be nice to him. My cats take good care of any rodents around.

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Like the original poster, I've slowly learned to wear long trousers, long sleeved shirt, broad rimmed hat, wellington boots and sturdy gloves when working on the land. I mainly do it for protection from the sun, but the boots and gloves, in particular, have saved me many times from the red weaver ants. However, I still manage to cop it a few times a day.

 

I've also learned to stow my outdoor gear somewhere safe from ants and other insects, otherwise the ants can infiltrate and get you where you least expect it. I've always wondered why insects don't crawl into my boots, but I've never had a problem that way. Sometimes a toad will settle inside which is squishy on the feet.

 

I reckon if you stand still outside for more than 2 minutes something will bite or sting you. Mind you, the horse flies, wasps, bees, mosquitoes and flies are nowhere as bad as back in Australia.

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2 hours ago, Stevemercer said:

Like the original poster, I've slowly learned to wear long trousers, long sleeved shirt, broad rimmed hat, wellington boots and sturdy gloves when working on the land. I mainly do it for protection from the sun, but the boots and gloves, in particular, have saved me many times from the red weaver ants. However, I still manage to cop it a few times a day.

 

I've also learned to stow my outdoor gear somewhere safe from ants and other insects, otherwise the ants can infiltrate and get you where you least expect it. I've always wondered why insects don't crawl into my boots, but I've never had a problem that way. Sometimes a toad will settle inside which is squishy on the feet.

 

I reckon if you stand still outside for more than 2 minutes something will bite or sting you. Mind you, the horse flies, wasps, bees, mosquitoes and flies are nowhere as bad as back in Australia.

but Thais will get into mango trees etc in their underwear so the ants can got rid of in water.

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5 hours ago, jko said:

My recipe for all insect bites is to very quickly apply a pad soaked in standard 70% alcohol (surgical spirit) , and keep it held there for five minutes or even longer, rubbing gently. This seems to change the chemical structure of the venom (?) and the sting is considerably lessened, or often goes away completely. I have tried this with the small (almost transparent) scorpions, big black soldier ants, and most recently with a bee sting. All worked nicely! If you delay the alcohol treatment, the result is not as effective. The alcohol will also act as an antiseptic, so good to do anyway. Comments on this technique will be welcome.

I rub a bit of "tiger balm" over the ant bites and I find that quite soothing as well. But I think your 70% wipe is better. I must try that next time. 

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These chaps arrived yesterday evening. A tin of chaindrite is only going to make them cross.

 

Good to see them, great pollinators.

IMG20170422072131.jpg

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