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Death of Australian man parasailing in Phuket - two Thai men charged with negligence

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It's dangerously enough riding a bicycle in Thailand. Why risk your life in a parachute , especially when your old enough to know better ?   

 

You will never find me doing anything like that . I'm risking my life in the Thai traffic daily , enough excitement for me. 

 

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, VBF said:

I doubt Life Insurance would cover this - however my travel insurance covers both parasailing and parascending over water. Whether this gentleman had such insurance is obviously unknown by us.

Good to see that someone reads what they are covered for.

 

Just that I have read some weird small print/disclaimers etc etc, i.e. "provided that the operator is fully licensed or qualified and appropriately insured to operate such a business" but did not mention what that small print/disclaimer referred to, i.e. jet-ski or motorbike rental, parasailing or parascending, and it was reported in the press that this guy didn't have his paperwork wasn't in order, so if such a small print/disclaimer was in such a travel insurance policy, they might just be able to walk away ?

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8 hours ago, Argus Tuft said:

 

 

How on earth do you manage to infer a nonsense conspiracy theory with this accident?

Appalling post

I'd say because he looks at both sides of the coin, anything is possible in Thailand, i.e. I once had a village cop say to me, "welcome" when I 1st moved here, the next words were, if anybody bother you, I take care 10,000 baht, they disappear. 

 

Work that out, I thought he was kidding, that was until I later heard a particular trouble maker in the adjoining village disappeared, story is, everyone in that village agreed to turning his lights out and literally signed off on it, including his mother, because jail wasn't an option, always in and out, so the story goes, he was taken for a drive, grave dug out, shot to the back of the head and grave filled in.

 

My dad also told me of a story like this back in his own country, the cops just left the cell door and back door to the cop station open, and they hunted him down, half a dozen shots in the back, but that was in the 40's.

 

Sometime we can wear blinkers and call people paranoid, I like to look at all possibilities, and what the other poster said makes sense to me for what its worth.

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The Thai news are saying the guy panicked and unhooked himself, and was in fact still in the harness when he fell. It is shameful to spread this kind of misinformation! Probably according to police statements, while they are the first to hammer that the spreading of false information is a crime!

 

As some have already pointed out on this forum, it would be Houdini to arrive so quickly to unclip the clip fasteners under the life jacket! (There are normally 5 attachment points: 2 on the shoulders, 1 on the chest, 2 on the groin.) We still find the same tactic: they blame the victim, the client, in this case a Farang: "he panicked, he detached himself, it is his fault"! It is a total lack of respect towards the victim of the negligence of operators and negligence of authorities supposed to monitor safety!

 

One can see on the video that this man seemed in full form, perfectly happy and relaxed and that he showed absolutely no signs of fear or anxiety.

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3 hours ago, balo said:

It's dangerously enough riding a bicycle in Thailand. Why risk your life in a parachute , especially when your old enough to know better ?   

 

You will never find me doing anything like that . I'm risking my life in the Thai traffic daily , enough excitement for me. 

 

 

 

 

 

Bizarre thought process.

 

I'll bet you all the tea in China that the chances of dying or severe injury on the roads are about 1 million times more likely to happen than in a parachute ride.

 

And  age is of no consequence.

 

 

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19 hours ago, sensei said:

I've done that before and scares me to watch that video.

It is unconventional but a "navigator" flies with the client. He stirs the chute by tugging on the ropes because there is no way the client can stir himself back to shore against the wind and with the boat out at sea.

The "navigator" just holds on and sometimes would wrap his legs around the flyers' chest area just to get leverage. 

What i see here is that there is no way the man could have unhooked or unfastened the harness himself. His sheer weight would not allow that. It could have been a rip in the worn out harness.

This is a disaster and traumatic to his companions.

RIP old man.           "stir"  you mean steer ???

 

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On 13/07/2017 at 2:31 PM, 4MyEgo said:

Finally some truth to my theory of negligence on faulty equipment and not what I previously read, i.e. that the deceased pulled the hook which releases you.

 

So now what, a 500 baht fine each and 2 day suspension from going up again, more than likely IMO.

 

RIP to the digger, got to feel for his family, a holiday gone tragically wrong because of the relaxed regulations and laws, again IMO, in the Land of Smiles.

 

I also suspect that if he had any life insurance, they will be looking for an exit clause due to going up in the chute, hope that's not the case as that would just compound things for his widow and family.

Parasailing would be classified as a dangerous sport. Cover will be void in most policies.

 

Australian news..  UK news... New Zealand and also Indian news coverage of this.

 

Let's see TAT response... 

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4 hours ago, 4MyEgo said:

I'd say because he looks at both sides of the coin, anything is possible in Thailand, i.e. I once had a village cop say to me, "welcome" when I 1st moved here, the next words were, if anybody bother you, I take care 10,000 baht, they disappear. 

 

Work that out, I thought he was kidding, that was until I later heard a particular trouble maker in the adjoining village disappeared, story is, everyone in that village agreed to turning his lights out and literally signed off on it, including his mother, because jail wasn't an option, always in and out, so the story goes, he was taken for a drive, grave dug out, shot to the back of the head and grave filled in.

 

My dad also told me of a story like this back in his own country, the cops just left the cell door and back door to the cop station open, and they hunted him down, half a dozen shots in the back, but that was in the 40's.

 

Sometime we can wear blinkers and call people paranoid, I like to look at all possibilities, and what the other poster said makes sense to me for what its worth.

 

Another conspiracy loony.

 

Read again what you have written about shady murders and graves being dug - and tell us how that relates to this tragedy, which occurred in broad daylight, on a popular tourist beach in Thailand.  

 

Unbelievable

 

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42 minutes ago, Argus Tuft said:

 

Another conspiracy loony.

 

Read again what you have written about shady murders and graves being dug - and tell us how that relates to this tragedy, which occurred in broad daylight, on a popular tourist beach in Thailand.  

 

Unbelievable

 

Its obvious those that wear blinkers like yourself, cannot turn, so why bother wasting my time in responding to a horse that knows no different.

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2 minutes ago, 4MyEgo said:

Its obvious those that wear blinkers like yourself, cannot turn, so why bother wasting my time in responding to a horse that knows no different.

I asked you a valid question.  

 

Explain how your tales of shady murders in the dead of night can possibly relate to this tragedy which happened in broad daylight.

Simple question.

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Looking at the video, one may wonder if the problem is not the way in which one has proceeded to the harness, as well as (more likely) the position of the arms at the take-off.

 

If we see other parasailing videos in Phuket (see photos # 1 and # 2 of the top strip), we see that the customers are comfortably supported from the bottom, they are almost seated, as for the paragliding. In photo # 1 we see that the lady is firmly held down by straps passing under the groin and around the top of the thighs (blue arrow). On photo # 2, we see the operator who clips the bottom attachments (at the groin) and on photo # 3, he is seen in flight, also comfortably installed and well maintained from the bottom, in quasi-seated position (blue arrows). It will also be noted that the straps connecting the parachute to the boat rope pass clearly over the shoulders (red arrows).

 

(A few years ago I myself had the opportunity to do a parasailing flight at exactly the same place and it was a very pleasant experience, not at all frightening, the take-off and landing awas smooth, and the handing position on flight was comfortable.)

 

The video does not show the beginning of the harnessing procedure, precisely the harnessing of the bottom (in the groin and the upper thighs), but one wonders if the bottom straps have been properly clipped (photo # 4, blue arrow). Just a doubt, difficult to decide after the video.

 

In any case, the position of the arms at the time of departure is not correct. The arms are ABOVE the main straps of the parachute (red arrows on photos #5, #6 and #7), while they should of course be UNDER it, as shown in photos of a normal flight (red arrows on photos # 1 and # 3) and the operator should have verified this, he should have realized it, he should have brief the client correctly.

 

It will also be noted that his hands are closed precisely at the level of the snap hooks that connect the harness to the main parachute straps (green arrows on photos #5 – cf. also on photos #1 and #2).

 

At the time of take-off, a man (probably a ground operator) is seen who seems to have realized the problem and tries to warn by shouting and gestures of the arms (photo # 8).

 

15 seconds after take-off (at 02:30 on the original video), just when the operator positioned himself above it, it would seem that the client is spreading his arms - perhaps as a result of the pressure exerted by the parachute straps (photo # 9).

 

2 seconds later, he seems to be agitated, he is in trouble (photo # 10). Another second later, he is no longer held by the harness, he is only clawed arm tense - perhaps held at arm's length by the operator? - (photo # 11). The next moment, he falls...

 

The client would not have had time to unhook the harness under the life jacket; If he was badly secured from below (at the groin and upper thigh), then he would have slipped off the harness and would have fallen without his harness. If, as polce seems to say, he fell with his harness on then the problem is with the snap hooks that connect the harness to the two main thongs of the parachute.

 

The wrong position of the hands which was not corrected or even perceived by the operators in time was probably a trigger for the accident. A forensic review of the equipment could reveal if a defect of it has eventually come into play.

 

If the operator who performed the harnessing informed his client correctly, the accident would probably not have happened. If the ground operator had checked that everything was in order (positions of the customer, operator and equipment) before giving the signal to leave, the accident would probably not have happened.

 

There was obviouly a lack of security, perhaps not in terms of the equipment reliability but in terms of the security procedures before take-off. Blaming the customer is absolutely shameful!

 

Parasail.2.jpg

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In the Australian press, it is hypothesized (from the video) that it would be due to the bottom ties.
https://thewest.com.au/news/wa/expert-claims-leg-rings-failure-led-to-fatal-fall-ng-b88535549z
Easily verifiable assumption, depending on whether the client has fallen with or without his harness.

Interesting: they emphasize the fact that the equipment in Australia makes that one is in sitting position. In fact normaly in Phuket also (see photos on my post above)

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1 hour ago, Argus Tuft said:

I asked you a valid question.  

 

Explain how your tales of shady murders in the dead of night can possibly relate to this tragedy which happened in broad daylight.

Simple question.

My original reply to another poster agreed with his theory, i.e. he could have been taken out, i.e. he was apparently worth 250 mil, and I added that their is always two sides of the coin, and its possible because, bla bla bla

 

Does that clear things up now or are you still short a few bob of a pound ?

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1 hour ago, Lamar said:

Looking at the video, one may wonder if the problem is not the way in which one has proceeded to the harness, as well as (more likely) the position of the arms at the take-off.

 

If we see other parasailing videos in Phuket (see photos # 1 and # 2 of the top strip), we see that the customers are comfortably supported from the bottom, they are almost seated, as for the paragliding. In photo # 1 we see that the lady is firmly held down by straps passing under the groin and around the top of the thighs (blue arrow). On photo # 2, we see the operator who clips the bottom attachments (at the groin) and on photo # 3, he is seen in flight, also comfortably installed and well maintained from the bottom, in quasi-seated position (blue arrows). It will also be noted that the straps connecting the parachute to the boat rope pass clearly over the shoulders (red arrows).

 

(A few years ago I myself had the opportunity to do a parasailing flight at exactly the same place and it was a very pleasant experience, not at all frightening, the take-off and landing awas smooth, and the handing position on flight was comfortable.)

 

The video does not show the beginning of the harnessing procedure, precisely the harnessing of the bottom (in the groin and the upper thighs), but one wonders if the bottom straps have been properly clipped (photo # 4, blue arrow). Just a doubt, difficult to decide after the video.

 

In any case, the position of the arms at the time of departure is not correct. The arms are ABOVE the main straps of the parachute (red arrows on photos #5, #6 and #7), while they should of course be UNDER it, as shown in photos of a normal flight (red arrows on photos # 1 and # 3) and the operator should have verified this, he should have realized it, he should have brief the client correctly.

 

It will also be noted that his hands are closed precisely at the level of the snap hooks that connect the harness to the main parachute straps (green arrows on photos #5 – cf. also on photos #1 and #2).

 

At the time of take-off, a man (probably a ground operator) is seen who seems to have realized the problem and tries to warn by shouting and gestures of the arms (photo # 8).

 

15 seconds after take-off (at 02:30 on the original video), just when the operator positioned himself above it, it would seem that the client is spreading his arms - perhaps as a result of the pressure exerted by the parachute straps (photo # 9).

 

2 seconds later, he seems to be agitated, he is in trouble (photo # 10). Another second later, he is no longer held by the harness, he is only clawed arm tense - perhaps held at arm's length by the operator? - (photo # 11). The next moment, he falls...

 

The client would not have had time to unhook the harness under the life jacket; If he was badly secured from below (at the groin and upper thigh), then he would have slipped off the harness and would have fallen without his harness. If, as polce seems to say, he fell with his harness on then the problem is with the snap hooks that connect the harness to the two main thongs of the parachute.

 

The wrong position of the hands which was not corrected or even perceived by the operators in time was probably a trigger for the accident. A forensic review of the equipment could reveal if a defect of it has eventually come into play.

 

If the operator who performed the harnessing informed his client correctly, the accident would probably not have happened. If the ground operator had checked that everything was in order (positions of the customer, operator and equipment) before giving the signal to leave, the accident would probably not have happened.

 

There was obviouly a lack of security, perhaps not in terms of the equipment reliability but in terms of the security procedures before take-off. Blaming the customer is absolutely shameful!

 

Parasail.2.jpg

 

Yes, your analysis makes sense in many ways.

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