Jump to content
New Hosting Read more... ×
BANGKOK 20 January 2019 08:16

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

jeffandgop

What Snake Is This?

Recommended Posts

Thanks Crossy. My pic is similar to the link as well as the descriptive details. I took it to a field nearby and cut it loose. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, jeffandgop said:

Thanks Crossy. My pic is similar to the link as well as the descriptive details. I took it to a field nearby and cut it loose. 

Thanks, most people kill anything that moves.

regards Worgeordie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, jeffandgop said:

Thanks Crossy. My pic is similar to the link as well as the descriptive details. I took it to a field nearby and cut it loose. 

The local rats are filing a grievance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, tonray said:

The local rats are filing a grievance

Which ones on TV are you talking about ? 

 

OP you can look on FB we have a great snake forum in HH called snakes of Hua Hin. The group is easy to join and you can place photos for identification. They even have a catching service locally. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, jeffandgop said:

Thanks Crossy. My pic is similar to the link as well as the descriptive details. I took it to a field nearby and cut it loose. 

..a few years back i was talking to a farang in a mall..we got onto the topics of snakes..he mentioned he caught one in his yard at HangDong..he said he took it with his daughter quite some distance and let it go..he then asked me where i lived and after giving him a description it would appear he let the bloody thing free right near my home..oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go along with Striped Kukri ........................or a King Cobra , most folk would go for that .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

let it bite in YOUR nose......if you dont die ,let it go .

Because snakes are more important than you or your children ,

you have to nourish them.............................BS 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a general rule, snakes that drop onto you are most likely to be pythons (non-venomous) and more scared of you than vice-versa.  Snakes underfoot are usually venomous.  There are exceptions to both rules.  

The same applies to head sizes: if a snake has a head narrower than its neck it's most likely venomous; the big-headed are mostly pythons (constrictors).

Rattlesnakes and others in the viper family all have big lovely, striking (no pun intended) heads.  Most snakes (again, exceptions apply in breeding season, if they feel vulnerable after shedding, etc) avoid interaction with people and will slip away without ever being seen by you.

On the other hand. the super  deadly breeds can be almost arrogantly  fearless  even if they know you are about. Resist the temptation to intimidate or bother them.  

People can walk faster than a snake can cover ground and there's no shame in keeping well clear. 

As long as you're outside strike range (about the length of the snake's body.  

Snakes have poor vision at the best of times - it's why normal prey defence is to freeze until the snake goes away.  

Unfortunately I've also seen non-venomous snakes start to bung on an act of ferocity, pretendng they're actually a venomous breed, coiled and ready  to strike. Might work fine with other animals but a death warrant if they do it in front of a human.

A long, stiff-bristle farang-stryle yardbroom can be used to encourage snakes up to about a metre. long to go somewhere else without hurting them unnecessarily.  You can also drop the plastic lid of a standard rubbish bin over them and contain them with a housebrick on top until an experienced handler can deal with them for you. 

The non-venomous species can be great pets, very low maintenance, no smell, (their droppings are just like chalk sticks)  and they need little water (altho they love a swim).  They prefer to kill live food - a standard rat oncce a fortnight is enough (depending on size, of course), They can be beautiful, fqascinating house-friendly companions - rodents won't share a house with them if you let them explore your interior occasionally.  They're great escape artists and should only wander your house freely under close supervision.  A/conditioenrs make them sluggish. They can hibernate in  cloth bag quite happily when you need them out of the way of visitors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, SOUTHERNSTAR said:

Which ones on TV are you talking about ? 

 

OP you can look on FB we have a great snake forum in HH called snakes of Hua Hin. The group is easy to join and you can place photos for identification. They even have a catching service locally. 

 

Facebook page by same people "Snakes of Chiang Mai"
 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/121136308469728/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, sandemara said:

As a general rule, snakes that drop onto you are most likely to be pythons (non-venomous) and more scared of you than vice-versa.  Snakes underfoot are usually venomous.  There are exceptions to both rules.  

The same applies to head sizes: if a snake has a head narrower than its neck it's most likely venomous; the big-headed are mostly pythons (constrictors).

Rattlesnakes and others in the viper family all have big lovely, striking (no pun intended) heads.  Most snakes (again, exceptions apply in breeding season, if they feel vulnerable after shedding, etc) avoid interaction with people and will slip away without ever being seen by you.

On the other hand. the super  deadly breeds can be almost arrogantly  fearless  even if they know you are about. Resist the temptation to intimidate or bother them.  

People can walk faster than a snake can cover ground and there's no shame in keeping well clear. 

As long as you're outside strike range (about the length of the snake's body.  

Snakes have poor vision at the best of times - it's why normal prey defence is to freeze until the snake goes away.  

Unfortunately I've also seen non-venomous snakes start to bung on an act of ferocity, pretendng they're actually a venomous breed, coiled and ready  to strike. Might work fine with other animals but a death warrant if they do it in front of a human.

A long, stiff-bristle farang-stryle yardbroom can be used to encourage snakes up to about a metre. long to go somewhere else without hurting them unnecessarily.  You can also drop the plastic lid of a standard rubbish bin over them and contain them with a housebrick on top until an experienced handler can deal with them for you. 

The non-venomous species can be great pets, very low maintenance, no smell, (their droppings are just like chalk sticks)  and they need little water (altho they love a swim).  They prefer to kill live food - a standard rat oncce a fortnight is enough (depending on size, of course), They can be beautiful, fqascinating house-friendly companions - rodents won't share a house with them if you let them explore your interior occasionally.  They're great escape artists and should only wander your house freely under close supervision.  A/conditioenrs make them sluggish. They can hibernate in  cloth bag quite happily when you need them out of the way of visitors.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People can walk faster than a snake cover ground? I do not think so. I have seen plenty of fast snakes around my house. I could not run as fast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, you would be a fool to think that you can walk away from a snake that is comming for you.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, sandemara said:

As a general rule, snakes that drop onto you are most likely to be pythons (non-venomous) and more scared of you than vice-versa.  Snakes underfoot are usually venomous.  There are exceptions to both rules.  

The same applies to head sizes: if a snake has a head narrower than its neck it's most likely venomous; the big-headed are mostly pythons (constrictors).

Rattlesnakes and others in the viper family all have big lovely, striking (no pun intended) heads.  Most snakes (again, exceptions apply in breeding season, if they feel vulnerable after shedding, etc) avoid interaction with people and will slip away without ever being seen by you.

On the other hand. the super  deadly breeds can be almost arrogantly  fearless  even if they know you are about. Resist the temptation to intimidate or bother them.  

People can walk faster than a snake can cover ground and there's no shame in keeping well clear. 

As long as you're outside strike range (about the length of the snake's body.  

Snakes have poor vision at the best of times - it's why normal prey defence is to freeze until the snake goes away.  

Unfortunately I've also seen non-venomous snakes start to bung on an act of ferocity, pretendng they're actually a venomous breed, coiled and ready  to strike. Might work fine with other animals but a death warrant if they do it in front of a human.

A long, stiff-bristle farang-stryle yardbroom can be used to encourage snakes up to about a metre. long to go somewhere else without hurting them unnecessarily.  You can also drop the plastic lid of a standard rubbish bin over them and contain them with a housebrick on top until an experienced handler can deal with them for you. 

The non-venomous species can be great pets, very low maintenance, no smell, (their droppings are just like chalk sticks)  and they need little water (altho they love a swim).  They prefer to kill live food - a standard rat oncce a fortnight is enough (depending on size, of course), They can be beautiful, fqascinating house-friendly companions - rodents won't share a house with them if you let them explore your interior occasionally.  They're great escape artists and should only wander your house freely under close supervision.  A/conditioenrs make them sluggish. They can hibernate in  cloth bag quite happily when you need them out of the way of visitors.

Thank you for this great write up. I wasn't concerned for myself, rather my small dog that is very curious about anything he comes across in our yard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

Sponsors
×