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SteveK

Thinking of moving to Isaan

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Issan language is more akin to lao than thai. The sad thing is I have met many people from bkk that are offended by people from issan speaking their native language. But bkk people forcing their will on others is normal.

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4 hours ago, bwpage3 said:

You don't have a clue what you are talking about. English probably has similarities to Chinese right? 

 

Who was talking about learning the language? Not me, so why make up stories?

 

"Reality is, the Isaan dialect has many similarities with central Thai, particularly the number system" and I am sure running around Isaan talking about numbers is something of value?

 

You are a complete idiot. 

 

 

Name-calling and an inability to back up the nonsense falling out of your vapid mouth.

 

"You don't have a clue what you are talking about."

 

Often spouted by mediocrities who then don't follow up: "English probably has similarities to Chinese right?" - this is irrelevant and makes you look stupid. You have failed to make any intelligent point at all.

 

"Who was talking about learning the language? Not me, so why make up stories?"

 

Since you are not very bright, I will put you out of your misery: you were saying a foreigner cannot understand a word of the Isaan dialect... and that is about language learning, it certainly isn't the topic of horse-racing or flights to Singapore, is it?

 

"...and I am sure running around Isaan talking about numbers is something of value?"

 

Once again, off-topic nonsense, failing to understand basic principles of communication and life experience. Or, to put it bluntly for a blunt mind to fathom: 'running around Isaan talking about numbers' is not what I was posting about.

 

As I said, stick to the tourist areas where you can cope. You have no chance of ever learning the language if the brain-power shown in your post is anything to go by.

 

 

You know, it's boring to respond to such a mindless, content-free post, you'll need to do much better if you want to keep my attention.

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4 hours ago, bwpage3 said:

You don't have a clue what you are talking about. English probably has similarities to Chinese right? 

 

Who was talking about learning the language? Not me, so why make up stories?

 

"Reality is, the Isaan dialect has many similarities with central Thai, particularly the number system" and I am sure running around Isaan talking about numbers is something of value?

 

You are a complete idiot. 

 

In reality Thai is spoken throughout Issan. 

 

Issan in general is populated by bilingual and trilingual people. Absolutely no reason why you won't be understood speaking "Central Thai".

Edited by puchooay

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3 hours ago, Hereinthailand said:

Issan language is more akin to lao than thai. The sad thing is I have met many people from bkk that are offended by people from issan speaking their native language. But bkk people forcing their will on others is normal.

You really should modify your first sentence to read " one of the Issan languages". There are several, you know. 

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Living in Isaan folk always ask me can you speak Thai, I reply "Bor" (Lao no) with a smile, they then ask can you speak Lao, I reply "Mai" (Thai no) with a smile, it usually causes a laugh.

 

Isaan folk speak many dialects of Lao/Isaan and they all understand each other, even understand Thai. Mrs.Trans is Isaan but speaks Thai if we are down south unless someone talks to her in Lao/Isaan..:smile:

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On 8/21/2017 at 0:05 PM, mogandave said:

Apparently it's 100% in Canada

Apparently. I am a Canadian citizen but worked and lived in the US.

Healthcare represents a large part (~40%) of the budget of each province.

The incidence of my tax contribution is much higher than what I pay for in the US.

 

Plus: In Canada, I go to a hospital ready to spend a day-long wait. Less if really urgent, but to say.

And half-day to see a private doctor, whereas I wait a maximum of 10 minutes in the US.

Plus quality of medicine which I think is better in the US: they have a better ability to diagnose than Canadian counterparts who require endless tests before attempting to diagnose.

True: in Canada, you wait four months or more for a scan, 8 months for an MRI. In Quebec that is.

 

To register at a walk-in clinic, you wait 1.5 hour in line outside from 6:30AM to 8, register and then you go back home and come back at 9 when dr pops in.

 

Unbelieveble? Plus two dr.s are in charge of the province!

 

 

Edited by AGLV0121

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Just now, GarryP said:

Perhaps you can get pretty much all you need without speaking Thai, but I do not want to be dependent on others. Take your motorcycle in to the local bike mechanic and try explaining the problem in English - it doesn't work. You need to take a Thai speaker with you. Go to hospital and talk to the doctors,  while many speak English to one level or another, you will find that if you are decent in Thai language you can often get much more information from them instead of just the basics. I have found that most doctors are relieved when they know I speak Thai and open up a lot more.

 

Renewing my motorbike registration and insurance, communicating with officials at the local district office, land office, etc. is no longer a frustrating experience and one where you need to rely on others. I do these things myself and do not need to be dependent on my wife. 

 

PS I barely speak with my neighbours, just smile, nod my head or say good morning.

 

Sure, when you get here, you can live comfortably enough without speaking the language, but as you live here longer and you invest time in learning the language to a reasonable level of competency many more things open up to you. It becomes a different place.    

The doctors I consider of a competent enough level to treat my family and I speak very good English. Even when I take my baby in for vaccines the doctor speaks to me about her development, not my wife. They love it, as they do not get to do it on a daily basis. Many will also ask for your services to help out their children so a good, close relationship is formed that is purely based around 'English'. 

All of those things you mentioned are not tasks that rely on people. They are quick tasks, tasks that are performed once a year that are actually directed at the Mrs anyway - as other than potentially vehicles, they are in her name. Anything more important should have a conversation before a decision is made anyway. 

In saying that, I can go up to my local government offices and speak English. I work for the city Tessaban, and on the odd occasion do work for my own Tessaban also. For those who are really having trouble with it, they probably find they can just write down the problem. As government officials have passed the English test so can write, but have just had no experiences with speaking. 

 

Like I said, people need to weigh up the pros/cons. For some, being able to speak Thai will be a huge advantage, but it seems the theme on this forum is very negative towards the people who don't. Which I really cannot comprehend why, as again, for many it is not that difficult to get by everyday life without speaking Thai. 

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9 minutes ago, wildewillie89 said:

The doctors I consider of a competent enough level to treat my family and I speak very good English. Even when I take my baby in for vaccines the doctor speaks to me about her development, not my wife. They love it, as they do not get to do it on a daily basis. Many will also ask for your services to help out their children so a good, close relationship is formed that is purely based around 'English'. 

All of those things you mentioned are not tasks that rely on people. They are quick tasks, tasks that are performed once a year that are actually directed at the Mrs anyway - as other than potentially vehicles, they are in her name. Anything more important should have a conversation before a decision is made anyway. 

In saying that, I can go up to my local government offices and speak English. I work for the city Tessaban, and on the odd occasion do work for my own Tessaban also. For those who are really having trouble with it, they probably find they can just write down the problem. As government officials have passed the English test so can write, but have just had no experiences with speaking. 

 

Like I said, people need to weigh up the pros/cons. For some, being able to speak Thai will be a huge advantage, but it seems the theme on this forum is very negative towards the people who don't. Which I really cannot comprehend why, as again, for many it is not that difficult to get by everyday life without speaking Thai. 

I have been to kids English seminars in Isaan for a bit of fun, just so they can hear a Londoner talk...:stoner:.....I can tell you the controllers have a problem conversing with me with my best English....:smile:

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34 minutes ago, transam said:

I have been to kids English seminars in Isaan for a bit of fun, just so they can hear a Londoner talk...:stoner:.....I can tell you the controllers have a problem conversing with me with my best English....:smile:

Yep, most English teachers are shocking. The actual officials for your everyday stuff aren't that bad as generally to get that level of education in the first place they had a structured education, and keep more up to date. Explains the class disparity in the country if you like.

 

Where it falls down with teachers is that the education union is quite strong here compared to other departments, so officials within it are incredibly lazy/couldn't care less so go backwards very fast. 

 

Generally, there is at least one good English speaker in each office. My wife deals with all farang issues at her government workplace for instance, even if it has nothing to do with her portfolio. And if there isn't, then I'm sure members partners can take the few minutes out of their time once or twice a year. Not a huge deal.

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2 minutes ago, wildewillie89 said:

Yep, most English teachers are shocking. The actual officials for your everyday stuff aren't that bad as generally to get that level of education in the first place they had a structured education, and keep more up to date. Explains the class disparity in the country if you like.

 

Where it falls down with teachers is that the education union is quite strong here compared to other departments, so officials within it are incredibly lazy/couldn't care less so go backwards very fast. 

 

Generally, there is at least one good English speaker in each office. My wife deals with all farang issues at her government workplace for instance, even if it has nothing to do with her portfolio. And if there isn't, then I'm sure members partners can take the few minutes out of their time once or twice a year. Not a huge deal.

Must say that when I have a 3BB prob and phone BKK the Thai staff are excellent, understand everything....:smile:

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10 minutes ago, GarryP said:

If I intend to live in a foreign country, I believe I should at least make some effort to learn the local language.  And from my own experience I have found life so much easier since I learned the language. Perhaps the examples I gave are not so applicable to you, but aren't car repairs, trips to hardware stores, understanding what officialdom requires, etc. important parts of our lives. You can own a car as a foreigner, so insurance and registration can be in your name.  Also, I definitely do not wish to rely on others for everything and have to use someone else as an interpreter of what is being said.  

 

I think as you drift through the threads on TV, you will find that quite a lot of people have become too reliant on their wives, and do not know what is going on around them because of this. Their wives also do not translate all that is being said and can be very selective in what they reveal. This becomes a non-issue once you speak the language. I am not saying that all wives are bad, but a good number of the sad stories we read about foreign men losing everything and being kicked into touch by the wife involve foreigners who cannot speak the language, are totally reliant on their wives for nearly everything and do not know what is going on around them.  They have lost all independence, something that both wives and husbands need to retain to a certain degree. 

 

Having said that I wish you all the best in your life with your wife and new child.  You certainly seem to have landed on your feet and are off to a much better start than most of us.   

 

As a Londoner I failed the "Ordinary" level English exam....Don't know why but I did...Perhaps I go to pieces at exams....:stoner:......But, my communication skills in whatever country l have been to have been great, using face, hands, all that stuff has got me through with a smile..

 

In LOS I have basic stuff, but for sure if l started talking Thai and didn't have the words to provide a perfect explanation to what l was trying to say then there would be lots of scratching of heads....

One thing I do know the ladies do not like a farang they know understands Thai and what they are talking about.....ashamed-smiley-emoticon.png.99196b9429cb400114c42e016bc94886.png

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